Conferences Modern Language Association Digital Humanities Sessions

Guide to Humanities-Computing Talks at the 2003 MLA Convention

The Association for Computers and the Humanities has compiled this list of sessions with computing-related talks at the 2003 Modern Language Association Convention (in San Diego, from December 27 through 30). Some of these sessions contain only one or two computing-related talks, but this list includes the entire program for each session.

In most cases you must pay the convention-registration fee in order to attend any of these talks. But one session is free and open to the public: “Modes of Scholarly Communication”. MLA talks are published at the discretion of their authors; if you want to obtain the text of a talk you were unable to attend, the best method is to contact the author directly.

Although the 2003 convention is now in the past, this information will remain available, as a record of what went on. Similar information for many other years is available via the main page on ACH MLA sessions.

Corrections and additions are welcome; please send them to John.Lavagnino@kcl.ac.uk.


Summary of Sessions

Saturday, 27 December 2003

3:30 to 4:45 p.m.

5:15 to 6:30 p.m.

7:00 to 8:15 p.m.

8:45 to 10:00 p.m.

Sunday, 28 December 2003

8:30 to 9:45 a.m.

10:15 to 11:30 a.m.

1:45 to 3:00 p.m.

3:30 to 4:45 p.m.

7:15 to 8:30 p.m.

Monday, 29 December 2003

8:30 to 9:45 a.m.

10:15 to 11:30 a.m.

1:45 to 3:00 p.m.

3:30 to 4:45 p.m.

7:15 to 8:30 p.m.

9:00 to 10:15 p.m.

Tuesday, 30 December 2003

8:30 to 9:45 a.m.

10:15 to 11:30 a.m.


8: Electronic Theory and Criticism

Saturday, 27 December 2003, 3:30 to 4:45 p.m., Cunningham A, Manchester Grand Hyatt

Program arranged by the Association for Computers and the Humanities.

Presiding: Vika Zafrin, Brown University

  • “Show, Not Tell: The Value of New Media Scholarship,” Cheryl E. Ball, Michigan Technological University
  • “The Simultaneous South: An Electronic, Multilinear Approach to Borges’s ‘The South’,” Marjorie Luesebrink, Irvine Valley College, CA

Respondent: Thomas Swiss, University of Iowa

See http://www.ach.org/mla03 for further details.


65: Nabokov after Lolita: Pnin and Pale Fire

Saturday, 27 December 2003, 5:15 to 6:30 p.m., Ford C, Manchester Grand Hyatt

Program arranged by the International Vladimir Nabokov Society.

Presiding: Charles D. Nicol, Indiana State University

  • “Pnin’s Cinderella: His History,” Gerald H. Cahill, Jr., Jamaica Plain, MA
  • “The Problem of Fiction in Pale Fire and Thomas’s Pale Fires,” Jonathan R. Bass, Rutgers University, New Brunswick
  • “Dramatic Interludes in Pale Fire,” Matthew I. Laufer, Columbia University
  • “Hypertextual Readings of Pale Fire,” Burcu S. Bakioglu, Indiana University, Bloomington

72: Teacher Preparation in English: The State of the Profession

Saturday, 27 December 2003, 5:15 to 6:30 p.m., Molly A, Manchester Grand Hyatt

Program arranged by the Council of Writing Program Administrators.

Presiding: Matthew Anthony Parfitt, Boston University

  • “The New Media Instructor: Cultural Capital and Writing Instruction,” Jeff R. Rice, University of Detroit Mercy
  • “The Writing Portfolio: Learning to Teach from Writing,” Rosemary Winslow, Catholic University of America
  • “The Madwoman in the Attic, the Sad Woman in the Basement, and the TAs in the Middle: Writing Centers, Writing Programs, and Teacher Preparation,” Melissa J. Ianetta, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater; E. Shelley Reid, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater

Respondent: Dawn Skorczewski, Emerson College


98: Prisons, Universities, Electronic Media: Possible and Impossible Communities I

Saturday, 27 December 2003, 7:00 to 8:15 p.m., Edward C and D, Manchester Grand Hyatt

Program arranged by the Division on Comparative Studies in Twentieth-Century Literature.

Presiding: Jarrod L. Hayes, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

  • “Political Fictions: Don DeLillo and Joan Didion,” Linda S. Kauffman, University of Maryland, College Park
  • “Inoperative Bodies: Electronic Media and the Inhuman in the War on Terror,” Scott O. McClintock, University of California, Fullerton
  • “Flourishing or Slight and Inaccessible Communities: The University and Other Contexts,” Ana M. Luszczynska, State University of New York, Buffalo
  • “Un-American Studies,” McKenzie Wark, State University of New York, Albany

103: Italy and the Cultures of Migration

Saturday, 27 December 2003, 7:00 to 8:15 p.m., Point Loma, San Diego Marriott

Program arranged by the Division on Twentieth-Century Italian Literature.

Presiding: Graziella Parati, Dartmouth College

  • “Migrating Womanhood: From Italian to Italian American,” MaryJo Bona, State University of New York, Stony Brook
  • “Space, Race, and Female Subjectivity in Bertolucci’s L’assedio,” Roberta Di Carmine, University of Oregon
  • “The Digital Landscape of Migrant Cultures in Italy (1993–2003),” Timothy Campbell, Cornell University

109: The Professional Dimensions of Technology in English Studies

Saturday, 27 December 2003, 7:00 to 8:15 p.m., Cunningham C, Manchester Grand Hyatt

Program arranged by the Division on Teaching as a Profession.

Presiding: Randy Bass, Georgetown University

  • “Wired English Studies,” Anne Ruggles Gere, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • “Educational Technology, Faculty Roles, and Academic Labor,” Lawrence F. Hanley, City College, City University of New York

Respondent: Randy Bass

117: E-Teaching American Studies Internationally

Saturday, 27 December 2003, 7:00 to 8:15 p.m., America’s Cup A and B, Manchester Grand Hyatt

A special session.

Session leader: Dorothea Fischer-Hornung, University of Heidelberg

  • “Creating a Cultural Studies Consortium: The Genre Evolution Project,” Eric S. Rabkin, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • “Generating Customized Resource Web Sites: The Humbul Humanities Hub,” Marina Cacioppo, University of Oxford
  • “E-Teaching American Studies Internationally: www.acs-onweb.de,” Dorothea Fischer-Hornung; Wolfgang Holtkamp, University of Stuttgart

Respondent: Deborah Lea Madsen, University of Geneva


159: The Changing Face of Scholarly Editions

Saturday, 27 December 2003, 8:45 to 10:00 p.m., Molly B, Manchester Grand Hyatt

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Scholarly Editions.

Presiding: Margaret J. M. Ezell, Texas A&M University, College Station

Speakers: Linda Bree, Cambridge University Press; Evelyn B. Tribble, University of Otago; James Barry Fitzmaurice, Northern Arizona University; Gary A. Stringer, University of Southern Mississippi


161: Prisons, Universities, Electronic Media: Possible and Impossible Communities II

Sunday, 28 December 2003, 8:30 to 9:45 a.m., Upper Room 5A, San Diego Convention Center

Program arranged by the Division on Comparative Studies in Twentieth-Century Literature.

Presiding: Paul Gordon, University of Colorado, Boulder

  • “Not Even the Lark Sees the Open (Heidegger): Limiting/Delimiting the Human in the Humanities,” Nancy Blake, University of Illinois, Urbana
  • “Race among Ruins: Whiteness, Writing, and Work in the New University,” Mike Hill, State University of New York, Albany
  • “New Media Art and Rhizomatic Instability,” Timothy C. Murray, Cornell University
  • “The Rhizomatic Community,” Henry S. Sussman, State University of New York, Buffalo

167: Language Learning and Technology I: Technology and Foreign Language Pedagogy

Sunday, 28 December 2003, 8:30 to 9:45 a.m., Columbia 1, San Diego Marriott

Program arranged by the Division on Applied Linguistics.

Presiding: Julie Anne Belz, Penn State University, University Park

  • “An Integrated SLA Model Combining Personal Web Sites with Course Management Systems in Second-Year French,” Christopher J. Ippolito, University of the Pacific
  • “Using Digital Video to Enhance Listening Comprehension and Cultural Competence,” Susan Carpenter Binkley, College of Wooster

183: The Subjects of New Media

Sunday, 28 December 2003, 8:30 to 9:45 a.m., Betsy A, Manchester Grand Hyatt

A special session.

Session leader: Elizabeth A. Walden, Bryant College

  • “The Silent Masses: The Subjects of Digital Cinema,” Michelle R. Stewart, State University of New York, Purchase
  • “Affect and Agency: Postsubjects in New Media,” Elizabeth A. Walden
  • “Virtual Movement: Visceral Affect and Dispersed Identification,” Petra Kuppers, Bryant College

184: Theorizing Visual Rhetoric

Sunday, 28 December 2003, 8:30 to 9:45 a.m., Ford A and B, Manchester Grand Hyatt

A special session.

Session leader: Christine L. Alfano, Stanford University

  • “Multivocal, Multimedia: A Bakhtinian Approach to Visual Rhetoric,” Alyssa J. O’Brien, Stanford University
  • “Spaces of Possibility in the Composition Classroom: Visual Tactics and ‘The Power to Impose a Hearing’,” David Paul Sherman, California State University, Dominguez Hills
  • “The Visual Performative as Deliberative Rhetoric,” Kevin Eric De Pew, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

190: Undergraduate Students as Collaborators in Foreign Language Research

Sunday, 28 December 2003, 8:30 to 9:45 a.m., Torrance, San Diego Marriott

Program arranged by the MLA Advisory Committee on Foreign Languages and Literatures.

Presiding: Michael E. Geisler, Middlebury College

  • “Joys and Dilemmas of Working with Undergraduate Student Researchers in the Humanities,” Elizabeth Bernhardt, Stanford University
  • “The Re-creative Foreign Language Theater Practicum: Research with Students toward New Forms of Artistic Production and Reception,” Les Essif, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • “RAP, the Research Abroad Program at the Univesity of Pittsburgh,” Dennis Looney, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh
  • “Using the Web to Enhance the Study of Literature: Three Projects for Advanced-Level German,” Anne Marie Green, Carnegie Mellon University; Caroline Schaumann, Emory University

195: Surfing the Internet to Rethink Medieval Culture

Sunday, 28 December 2003, 10:15 to 11:30 a.m., Columbia 1, San Diego Marriott

Program arranged by the Division on French Medieval Language and Literature.

Presiding: Barbara K. Altmann, University of Oregon

  • “Toward the Dynamic Transmission of Medieval Texts,” Amy Victoria Ogden, University of Virginia
  • “Medieval Women Online: New Digital Materials for Research and Teaching,” Stephanie G. Wood, University of Oregon
  • “‘Au moins, sera de moy memoire’: Reception History and the Société François Villon,” Robert Dabney Peckham, University of Tennessee, Martin

Respondent: Michel-André Bossy, Brown University


281: Digital Theory

Sunday, 28 December 2003, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., Upper Room 5A, San Diego Convention Center

Program arranged by the Division on Literary Criticism.

Presiding: Diana Jean Fuss, Princeton University

  • “On the Persistence of Visual Knowledge,” Wendy H. Chun, Brown University
  • “Of Kinetology,” Mark B. N. Hansen, Princeton University
  • “The Murmur of Machines: Theorizing the Interrelation of Code and Natural Language,” N. Katherine Hayles, University of California, Los Angeles

287: Why I Do (Not) Use Digital Resources

Sunday, 28 December 2003, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., Ford A and B, Manchester Grand Hyatt

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Computer Studies in Language and Literature.

Presiding: Malcolm Hayward, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

  • “Converging Research and Teaching: StreetPrint, a Digital Archive of Street Literature,” Gary D. Kelly, University of Alberta
  • “Using Digital Documents as Hyper-Textbooks,” Kevin LaGrandeur, New York Institute of Technology
  • “Something Wiki This Way Comes: Pros and Cons of a Collaborative Class Web Site,” Mark Phillipson, Bowdoin College

Respondent: Malcolm Hayward

296: Reciprocity in the Relation between Cognitive Science and Literary Studies: What Can We Offer to Them and Why Should They Care?

Sunday, 28 December 2003, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., Cunningham A, Manchester Grand Hyatt

A special session.

Session leader: Nancy Lincoln Easterlin, University of New Orleans

  • “Woolf, Pinker, and the Theory of Mind,” Lisa Zunshine, University of Kentucky
  • “Hard Cases: On Being a Host in a Machine,” Blakey Vermeule, Northwestern University

Respondent: David John Herman, North Carolina State University


345: Modes of Scholarly Communication

Sunday, 28 December 2003, 3:30 to 4:45 p.m., Upper Room 1A, San Diego Convention Center

Presiding: David Greene Nicholls, MLA

  • “New Media, Old Practices, and the Evaluation of Scholarship,” Jerome J. McGann, University of Virginia
  • “In Defense of the Monograph: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Acquisitions,” Ken Wissoker, Duke University Press
  • “Is a Grapefruit Better than a Grape?” Marshall J. Brown, University of Washington, Seattle

395: Language Learning and Technology II: Research on Technology in Foreign Language Learning

Sunday, 28 December 2003, 7:15 to 8:30 p.m., Columbia 1, San Diego Marriott

Program arranged by the Division on Applied Linguistics.

  • “Constructivism and Online Professional Development: A Study of the Beliefs and Practices of Four Foreign Language Teachers,” Ekaterina N. Koubek, University of Nebraska, Lincoln
  • “Integrating WebCT Discussion Activities in a College-Level Elementary Chinese Course,” Youping Zhang, Rutgers University, New Brunswick
  • “Are CALL and SLA Theory Compatible? Evidence Supporting the Positive Role of Task-Based, Computer-Mediated Interaction in the ESL Classroom,” Bryan Smith, Texas Tech University

406: The Crisis in Scholarly Publishing: Comparative Literature and Literatures in the Smaller-Market Foreign Languages

Sunday, 28 December 2003, 7:15 to 8:30 p.m., Solana, San Diego Marriott

A special session.

Session leader: Caroline D. Eckhardt, Penn State University, University Park

  • “A Learned Society’s Perspective: What Can Professional Associations Do?” Pauline Ruth Yu, University of California, Los Angeles
  • “A University Press Editor’s Perspective: The Economic Crisis for Presses and the Options for Publishing on Foreign Language Literatures,” Mary E. Murrell, Princeton University Press
  • “A Department Head’s Perspective: Economies of Scarcity and Economies of Excess—between Paper and Electronic Publishing,” C. P. Haun Saussy, Stanford University

408: Information Technology and the Profession

Sunday, 28 December 2003, 7:15 to 8:30 p.m., Upper Room 5A, San Diego Convention Center

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Information Technology.

Presiding: Michael Groden, University of Western Ontario

  • “The Humanities Mission in the Age of Information: Technology, Technique, History,” Alan Liu, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • “Inventing the Medium,” Janet H. Murray, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • “It’s Not the Technology, Stupid!” Jerome J. McGann, University of Virginia

Respondent: Richard A. Lanham, University of California, Los Angeles


420: The Place of French Studies in Various Visions for a Renaissance Center

Monday, 29 December 2003, 8:30 to 9:45 a.m., Santa Rosa, San Diego Marriott

Program arranged by the Division on Sixteenth-Century French Literature.

Presiding: Cynthia Skenazi, University of California, Santa Barbara

  • “Making the Center Hold: The Place of the ACMRS (Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies) in Medieval and Renaissance Studies,” Robert E. Bjork, Arizona State University, Tempe
  • “Research Centers in a Digital Society: Strategies and Plans of the Center for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, Toronto,” William R. Bowen, University of Toronto
  • “Various Visions for a Renaissance Center,” Arthur F. Kinney, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

438: Editorial Theory and Practice in the Computer Age

Monday, 29 December 2003, 8:30 to 9:45 a.m., America’s Cup A and B, Manchester Grand Hyatt

A special session.

Session leader: Richard J. Finneran, University of Tennessee, Knoxville

  • “‘The World with a Fence around It’; or, Has the Electronic Archive Rendered the Codex-Based Edition Obsolete?” W. Speed Hill, Lehman College, City University of New York
  • “The New Stemmatics,” Barbara Bordalejo, De Montfort University
  • “Technological Applications in Manuscript Editing: W. B. Yeats’s The Speckled Bird as an Example,” William H. O’Donnell, University of Memphis

490: New Paradigms in Humanities Computing

Monday, 29 December 2003, 10:15 to 11:30 a.m., Del Mar B, Manchester Grand Hyatt

Program arranged by the Association for Computers and the Humanities.

Presiding: Stephen J. Ramsay, University of Georgia

  • “‘Is this a vision? is this a dream?’: Finding new dimensions in Shakespeare criticism,” Michael Best, University of Victoria
  • “Humanities Computing and Community of Minds: Situating the Individual in the Collective,” Mark V. Olsen, University of Chicago
  • “Cybernetic Constructivism,” Stephen J. Ramsay

See http://www.ach.org/mla03 for further details.


570: Evaluation of Digital Scholarship in the Academy

Monday, 29 December 2003, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., Upper Room 5B, San Diego Convention Center

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Information Technology.

Presiding: Mary Ann Lyman-Hager, San Diego State University

Speakers: Robert A. Fischer, Southwest Texas University; Heidi Byrnes, Georgetown University; Iain L. Crawford, University of Southern Indiana

Respondent: James F. Knapp, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh

For copies of the CIT Guidelines for Evaluating Digital Scholarship and for Distance Education, please go to http://www.mla.org/reports/guidelines_evaluation_digital and http://www.mla.org/reports/statement_aaup_distance_ed.

574: Editing the Romantics

Monday, 29 December 2003, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., Randle A and B, Manchester Grand Hyatt

Program arranged by the Keats–Shelley Association of America.

Presiding: Lisa Vargo, University of Saskatchewan

  • “An Editorial Project for the Future: The Letters of William Godwin,” Pamela Anne Clemit, University of Durham
  • “The Editor and Mrs. Smith: Who Is She?” Jacqueline M. Labbe, University of Warwick
  • “Editing Dramas That (Don’t) Matter,” Jeffrey N. Cox, University of Colorado, Boulder; Michael Crews Gamer, University of Pennsylvania
  • The Cenci Unbound: A Hypertextual Edition,” Cajsa C. Baldini, Arizona State University, Tempe

592: Digital Arthur

Monday, 29 December 2003, 3:30 to 4:45 p.m., Betsy A, Manchester Grand Hyatt

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Arthurian Literature.

Presiding: Laurie Anne Finke, Kenyon College

  • “Does Technology Matter? Arthurian Film on DVD,” Martin Barry Shichtman, Eastern Michigan University

603: Narrating the German Capital in the Age of Globalization: The “Impossible” Berlin Novel at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century

Monday, 29 December 2003, 3:30 to 4:45 p.m., Manchester 2, San Diego Marriott

A special session.

Session leader: Claudia Breger, Indiana University, Bloomington

  • “A ‘Historical Washbasin’: The Paradoxes of Narrating Berlin,” Walter Erhart, University of Greifswald
  • “Tracing History through Berlin’s Topography: Historical Memories and Post-1989 Berlin Narratives,” Carol Anne Costabile-Heming, Southwest Missouri State University
  • “Global Village Berlin: Rainald Goetz’s Internet Diaries Abfall für Alle,” Brigitte Weingart, University of Köln
  • “Berlin Cuts: Monstrous Imagination and the City in Contemporary German Narratives,” Doerte Bischoff, University of Münster

610: The Josephine A. Roberts Forum: Twenty-First Century Foxe—The Online Genetic Edition of John Foxe’s Book of Martyrs

Monday, 29 December 2003, 3:30 to 4:45 p.m., Randle A and B, Manchester Grand Hyatt

Program arranged by the Renaissance English Text Society.

Presiding: John N. King, Ohio State University, Columbus

  • “Textual Genetics and Protestant Martyrs: The British Academy Edition of Foxe’s Martyrology,” Mark Greengrass, Sheffield University
  • “Print Reformation or Print Revolution? John Foxe and the History of Books,” Jesse Macliesh Lander, University of Notre Dame
  • “From Manuscript to Codex to E-Book: The Interactive Foxe,” Susan Wabuda, Fordham University, Bronx

647: Theorizing the Interface

Monday, 29 December 2003, 7:15 to 8:30 p.m., Randle A and B, Manchester Grand Hyatt

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Bibliography and Textual Studies.

Presiding: Neil Richard Fraistat, University of Maryland, College Park

  • “Algorithm and Interface in the Electronic Scholarly Edition,” Raymond G. Siemens, Malaspina University College
  • “Reading beyond the Interface: The New Annotated E-Edition,” Susan Schreibman, University of Maryland, College Park
  • “Synthetic Databases, Idiosyncratic Analyses, and Scholarly Editing,” David Lee Gants, University of New Brunswick

649: Conflicts in Present-Day Englishes: What Is and What Should Never Be

Monday, 29 December 2003, 7:15 to 8:30 p.m., Betsy A, Manchester Grand Hyatt

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Present-Day English Language.

Presiding: Deborah H. Holdstein, Governors State University

  • “Performing Genres,” Regina A. Clemens Fox, Arizona State University, Tempe
  • “Student Language Use in Electronic Environments,” Laura L. McGrath, University of Georgia
  • “Of,” Eric J. Hyman, Fayetteville State University

Respondent: Deborah H. Holdstein


682: Language Learning and Technology III: Language Learning and Technology

Monday, 29 December 2003, 9:00 to 10:15 p.m., Columbia 1, San Diego Marriott

Program arranged by the Division on Applied Linguistics.

  • “Technologies and Ideologies of Foreign Language Education,” Robert Train, Sonoma State University
  • “Computer-Mediated Intercultural Foreign Language Education: Accounts from France, Germany, Spain, and the United States,” Julie Anne Belz, Penn State University, University Park
  • “ The Development of Pragmatic Competence in Telecollaboration: The Case of German Modal Participles,” Nina Vyatkina, Penn State University, University Park

687: Cyberspace and the Industrial Revolution

Monday, 29 December 2003, 9:00 to 10:15 p.m., Betsy A, Manchester Grand Hyatt

A special session.

Session leader: Jason B. Jones, Georgia Institute of Technology

  • “Rebuilding the Transatlantic Industrial Revolution Online,” Scott Ellis, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • “The Victorian Archive and the Disappearance of the Book,” Dino Franco Felluga, Purdue University, West Lafayette
  • “Frankenstein’s Futurity: AI, Robotics, and Turing Tests Online,” Jay Clayton, Vanderbilt University

695: California Connections

Monday, 29 December 2003, 9:00 to 10:15 p.m., Point Loma, San Diego Marriott

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Information Technology.

Presiding: Bette G. Hirsch, Cabrillo College

  • “Getting to Know You: Developing a Web-Based Assessment Tool,” H. Jay Siskin, Cabrillo College
  • “The Absent Professor: Technical Innovation versus Student Expectations in a Hybrid French Civilization Course,” Gretchen V. Angelo, California State University, Los Angeles
  • “Spanish without Walls: Results from a Distance-Learning Language Course,” Robert James Blake, University of California, Davis

702: Beyond Difference: Contemporary Theories of Culture in Latin America

Tuesday, 30 December 2003, 8:30 to 9:45 a.m., Leucadia, San Diego Marriott

Program arranged by the Division on Twentieth-Century Latin American Literature.

Presiding: Carlos J. Alonso, University of Pennsylvania

  • “Indigenous Bodies and Audiovisual Narratives: Some Notes on Decolonization and Immaterial Labor,” Freya Schiwy, University of Connecticut, Storrs
  • “Queer Elsewhere: Global Divas and Border Patrol in Mayra Santos Febres’s Sirena Selena vestida de pena,” Dara E. Goldman, University of Illinois, Urbana
  • “The Emergent Paradigm of Textual Circuitry: Epistemological Reprocessing in Digital Society,” Phillip T. Penix-Tadsen, University of Pennsylvania
  • “Cultura y poder en América Latina: Los límites de la epistemología y los proyectos críticos de Antonio Cornejo Polar y Silvia Rivera Cusicanqui,” Silvia Bermúdez, University of California, Santa Barbara

732: Technologies of Memory

Tuesday, 30 December 2003, 10:15 to 11:30 a.m., Molly B, Manchester Grand Hyatt

Program arranged by the Division on the English Romantic Period.

Presiding: Alan Richardson, Boston College

  • “Daffodil VR: Memory as Romantic Medium,” Richard Menke, University of Georgia
  • “Fascinating Rhythm,” Margaret E. Russett, University of Southern California
  • “Juan the Memorious: The Feinaiglian Narrative Dynamics of Don Juan,” Stuart Samuel Peterfreund, Northeastern University

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