Conferences Modern Language Association Digital Humanities Sessions

Guide to Humanities-Computing Talks at the 2005 MLA Convention

The Association for Computers and the Humanities has compiled this list of sessions with computing-related talks at the 2005 Modern Language Association Convention (in Washington, DC, from December 27 through 30). Some of these sessions contain only one or two computing-related talks, but this list includes the entire program for each session.

You must pay the convention-registration fee in order to attend any of these talks; none of them are open to those who haven’t registered. MLA talks are published at the discretion of their authors; if you want to obtain the text of a talk you were unable to attend, the best method is to contact the author directly.

Although the 2005 convention is now in the past, this information will remain available, as a record of what went on. Similar information for many other years is available via the main page on ACH MLA sessions.

Corrections and additions are welcome; please send them to John.Lavagnino@kcl.ac.uk.


Summary of Sessions

Wednesday, 28 December 2005

8:30–9:45 a.m.

10:15–11:30 a.m.

12:00 noon–1:15 p.m.

1:45–3:00 p.m.

3:30–4:45 p.m.

7:15–8:30 p.m.

Thursday, 29 December 2005

8:30–9:45 a.m.

10:15–11:30 a.m.

12:00 noon–1:15 p.m.

1:45–3:00 p.m.

3:30–4:45 p.m.

7:15–8:30 p.m.

Friday, 30 December 2005


127: Twenty-First-Century Galician Studies: New Spaces, New Voices

Wednesday, 28 December 2005, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Chevy Chase, Washington Hilton.

A special session.

Presiding: Kirsty J. Hooper, University of Liverpool.

  • “Poetry and Coalition Politics: The www.RedesEscarlata.org and the Weaving of New Galician Spaces,” Silvia Bermúdez, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • “Amusement Parks and Cemeteries: Fantastic Spaces of Galician Identity through Migration,” Eugenia Regina Romero, Ohio State University, Columbus
  • “Queering the Margins: Antón Lopo and Homoerotic Galician Poetry,” Timothy Michael McGovern, University of California, Santa Barbara

Respondent: Kirsty J. Hooper.

For copies of abstracts, visit pcwww.liv.ac.uk/~chomik.


149: The Poetic Line in the Age of New Media

Wednesday, 28 December 2005, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Maryland Suite A, Marriott.

Program arranged by the Division on Twentieth-Century American Literature.

Presiding: Dorothy J. Wang, Northwestern University.

  • “Getting Out of Line: The Visual-Spatial-Kinetic Line in Sign Language Poetry,” H-Dirksen L. Bauman, Gallaudet University
  • “Coauthoring with the Computer: A Questionable Collaboration,” Merrill Cole, Temple University
  • “Poetic Lines in/and Database Imaginations,” Adalaide Morris, University of Iowa
  • “The Poetics of Virtual and Junk Space: A Site-Oriented Line for the Twenty-First Century,” Jennifer Scappettone, University of Chicago

Respondent: Patrick F. Durgin, College of Saint Catherine


178: Marxism and Globalization

Wednesday, 28 December 2005, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Park Tower Suite 8216, Marriott.

A special session.

Presiding: Amrohini Sahay, State University of New York, Stony Brook.

  • “The New Imperialism? Globalization and Capitalist Accumulation,” Kanishka Chowdhury, University of Saint Thomas, Minnesota
  • “Crisis and Contradiction in Globalization,” Epifanio San Juan, Jr., Philippines Cultural Studies Center
  • “Global Networks, Imperial Culture,” Robert A. Wilkie, State University of New York, Albany

Respondent: Stephen C. Tumino, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh.

191: Teaching Indigenous and Foreign Languages

Wednesday, 28 December 2005, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Dupont, Washington Hilton.

Program arranged by the Committee on Community Colleges.

Presiding: Deborah Jean Gill, Penn State University, DuBois.

  • “Public and Private: Attitudes toward the Teaching of Foreign Languages,” Mary C. Dever, Western Connecticut State University; Aileen Dever, Quinnipiac University
  • “From Face-to-Face to Cyberspace: Interweaving Technology into Foreign Languages,” Deborah Jean Gill

224: Outside in the Archival Machine: Graduate Student Scholarship and the Archive

Wednesday, 28 December 2005, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Delaware Suite A, Marriott.

Program arranged by the Graduate Student Caucus.

Presiding: Steven Blevins, University of California, Davis.

  • “Grief as Medicine for Grief: Spencer’s Emblems and the Future of the Archive,” Joanne Diaz, Northwestern University
  • “Page Not Found: Archiving Hypertext at the End of History,” Annie McClanahan, University of California, Berkeley
  • “Hyper-materiality and Counter-archives,” Steven Blevins

232: New Media and Literary Criticism

Wednesday, 28 December 2005, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Military, Washington Hilton.

Program arranged by the Division on Literary Criticism.

Presiding: N. Katherine Hayles, University of California, Los Angeles.

  • “Ideality and Materiality of Digital Data,” Mark B. N. Hansen, Princeton University
  • “Reading Spaces,” Rita M. Raley, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • “New Media and the Forensic Imagination,” Matthew Gary Kirschenbaum, University of Maryland, College Park

262: The Language of Soundscape: “Rhythm Science” and Reading Electronic Music

Wednesday, 28 December 2005, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Nathan Hale, Marriott.

Program arranged by the Division on Literature and Science.

Presiding: Arielle Saiber, Bowdoin College.

  • “Electronic Music and the Limits of Digital Production,” Aden Evens, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • “The Uncanny Sample: From Text to Sound,” Angela AnnDora Frattarola, New York University
  • “Sampling Science: Hip-Hop as Parallel Distributed Processing,” Ryan Snyder Ananat, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • “Compositional Dwelling in Experimental Fiction and Software Sound Synthesis,” Martin E. Boyden, University of Rochester

269: What Video Games Teach Us about Literature

Wednesday, 28 December 2005, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Caucus, Washington Hilton.

A special session.

Presiding: Edward M. Wesp, Western New England College.

  • “The Past as Present: Virtual Histories and Historical Fictions,” Edward M. Wesp
  • “Constructions and Reconstructions of the Gothic,” Laurie Taylor, University of Florida
  • “Games’ Challenge to Literary Understanding,” Ian Bogost, Georgia Institute of Technology

Respondent: Eric R. J. Hayot, University of Arizona.


318: Ethnicity and Technicity: Race and Technoculture Studies

Wednesday, 28 December 2005, 7:15–8:30 p.m., Delaware Suite A, Marriott.

Program arranged by the Division on Popular Culture.

Presiding: Eva Cherniavsky, University of Washington, Seattle.

  • “Ring, Ring, Ring: Mobile Sensation,” Alexander G. Weheliye, Northwestern University
  • “‘Innocent by Contamination’: Queer World Making, Technological Mediation, and New Ethnicities in Samuel R. Delany’s Stars in My Pocket like Grains of Sand,” Thomas Foster, University of Washington, Seattle
  • “Race, Digitality, and Difference: Semiotics for the New Media,” Lisa Nakamura, University of Wisconsin, Madison

319: East Asian Canon in a Multimedia World

Wednesday, 28 December 2005, 7:15–8:30 p.m., Map, Washington Hilton.

Program arranged by the Division on East Asian Languages and Literatures to 1900.

Presiding: Lynne Kimiko Miyake, Pomona College.

  • “Refracting Royal Romance: Premodern Japanese Courtly Gender and Sexuality through the Prism of Popular Culture,” Robert Khan, University of London
  • “A Book in the Stream: The Vicissitudes of the Voice in The Dream of the Red Chamber and Its Mass Media Adaptations,” Ling Hon Lam, University of Chicago
  • “Kobayashi Issa, Japanese Haiku, and the Internet,” David G. Lanoue, Xavier University, Louisiana
  • “Pretty Boys, Burnished Chestnuts, Buck-Toothed ‘Nasties’: The Heroes of Manga Tales of Genjis,” Lynne Kimiko Miyake

328: Teaching Bibliography in a Digital Age

Wednesday, 28 December 2005, 7:15–8:30 p.m., Military, Washington Hilton.

Program arranged by the Division on Methods of Literary Research.

Presiding: William Baker, Northern Illinois University.

Speakers: Candace R. Benefiel, Texas A&M University, College Station; Maura Carey Ives, Texas A&M University, College Station; Katherine Diane Harris, San Jose State University; Harold Henry Hellwig, Idaho State University; Kenneth Womack, Penn State University, Altoona; David J. Gorman, Northern Illinois University.

336: Literary Texts from a Linguistic Perspective: Case Studies

Wednesday, 28 December 2005, 7:15–8:30 p.m., Kalorama, Washington Hilton.

Program arranged by the American Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese.

Presiding: Anna Klobucka, University of Massachusetts, North Dartmouth.

  • “Code Switching in Selected Chicano Literature,” Frank Nuessel, University of Louisville
  • “Attributes of the Best Knight in the World: A Computer-Assisted Analysis of the Use of Superlatives in the ‘Baladro del sabio Merlín’,” Tracy Van Bishop, New York University
  • “Written Spanish-English Code Switching: Artificial or Authentic?” Laura Callahan, City College, City University of New York

344: Globalizing the Humanities

Wednesday, 28 December 2005, 7:15–8:30 p.m., Park Tower Suite 8216, Marriott.

Program arranged by the Community College Humanities Association.

Presiding: Douglas J. Eisner, Fullerton College.

  • “The Network Reader: Writing, Reading, and Literacy in the Wake of Globalization,” Christian Moraru, University of North Carolina, Greensboro
  • “Development as Freedom? ‘Alternative Modernities’ in George Eliot and John Stuart Mill,” Lauren M. E. Goodlad, University of Illinois, Urbana

Respondent: George Louis Scheper, Community College of Baltimore County, Maryland.


351: Electronic Journals 2005

Thursday, 29 December 2005, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Delaware Suite A, Marriott.

Program arranged by the Committee on Information Technology.

Presiding: Irene Thompson, George Washington University.

  • Romantic Circles and Romantic Circles Praxis,” Steven E. Jones, Loyola University, Chicago; Orrin Nan Chung Wang, University of Maryland, College Park
  • The Writing Instructor,” David Blakesley, Purdue University, West Lafayette
  • Romanticism on the Net,” Bruce Edward Graver, Providence College; Michael Eberle-Sinatra, University of Montreal
  • Language Learning and Technology,” David Hiple, University of Hawai‘i, Manoa
  • Heritage Language Journal,” Kathleen Dillon, University of California, Davis
  • “‘Do As I Do … and Say’: Scholarly Journals as Communities of Practice and the Case of the Digital Medievalist,” Dorothy Porter, University of Kentucky

374: Negotiation as Theory, Theorizing Negotiation

Thursday, 29 December 2005, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Kennedy, Marriott.

Program arranged by the Committee on the Status of Women in the Profession.

Presiding: Paula Rabinowitz, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities.

  • “Housewife Noir: Accidental Death, Time Binds, and Negotiation,” Lisa Jeanne Fluet, Boston College
  • “The Theory behind the Theory of Gender and Negotiation,” Katie J. Hogan, Carlow University
  • “Web Feminism, Theory and Practice: Negotiating the Academy through VG: Voices from the Gaps,” Lauren Curtright, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities; Carla Elaine Johnson, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities; Rachel L. Mordecai, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities; Maria Zavialova, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Respondent: Paula Rabinowitz.

For copies of papers, visit www.voices.cla.umn.edu/vg.

381: Computer-Mediated Foreign Language Study

Thursday, 29 December 2005, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Edison, Washington Hilton.

Program arranged by the Division on Applied Linguistics.

Presiding: Judith Elaine Liskin-Gasparro, University of Iowa.

  • Telekorp: The Telecollaborative Learner Corpus of English and German,” Julie Anne Belz, Penn State University, University Park; Emily Rine, Penn State University, University Park
  • “Comparing Two Internet-Based-CALL Contexts for Writing in a Beginner, Postsecondary French as a Second Language Program: Achievement and Learner Perceptions,” Kimberly MacDonald, University of Toronto
  • “Learning Activities and Corrective Feedback via Instant Messenger in NS (Native Speaker)–NNS (Nonnative Speaker) and NNS-NNS Dyads,” Susana M. Sotillo, Montclair State University

383: The World Wide Web as Metamedium

Thursday, 29 December 2005, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Maryland Suite C, Marriott.

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Media and Literature.

Presiding: Susan Schreibman, University of Maryland, College Park.

  • “Real Virtuality and the Resistance of the Interface,” Aden Evens, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • “Technological Insufficiency and the Blake Model,” Adam Komisaruk, West Virginia University, Morgantown
  • “Web Noise,” Joseph A. Milutis, University of South Carolina, Columbia

400: Editing Whitman

Thursday, 29 December 2005, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Hoover, Marriott.

Program arranged by the Association for Documentary Editing.

Presiding: Joel Myerson, University of South Carolina, Columbia.

Speakers: Ed Folsom, University of Iowa; Kenneth M. Price, University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Susan M. Belasco, University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Ted Genoways, University of Virginia; Matt Cohen, Duke University.


443: New Technologies of Literary Investigation: Digital Demonstrations

Thursday, 29 December 2005, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Delaware Suite A, Marriott.

Program arranged by the Committee on Information Technology.

Presiding: Michael Groden, University of Western Ontario.

  • “The Stolen Time Archive,” Alice Gambrell, University of Southern California
  • “Turning the Pages: Displaying Manuscripts Digitally,” Clive Izard, British Library
  • “The Litgloss Collaboratory,” Maureen Jameson, State University of New York, Buffalo
  • “Doing Things with the William Blake Archive,” Kari M. Kraus, University of Rochester
  • “Mark Twain Digital Project,” Sharon K. Goetz, University of California, Berkeley
  • “Tamarind: Scholarly Text Analysis,” Stephen J. Ramsay, University of Georgia
  • “TAPoR (Text Analysis Portal for Research),” Geoffrey Rockwell, McMaster University

447: Pop Culture and the War on Terror

Thursday, 29 December 2005, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Coolidge, Marriott.

Program arranged by the Division on Popular Culture.

Presiding: Cynthia J. Fuchs, George Mason University.

  • “Apocalyptic Democracy and Iraq War Culture,” Joe Lockard, Arizona State University, Tempe
  • “‘America, Fuck Yeah!’: Patriotic Puppetry in Team America: World Police,” Anna Froula, University of Kentucky
  • “Virtual(ly) Torture: Video Games, Artificial Intelligence, and the War on Terror,” Mark L. Sample, George Mason University
  • “A Very Disturbed Place: Terror, Trauma, and TV,” Cynthia J. Fuchs

466: The Ethics of Cyberpedagogy: Intellectual Property

Thursday, 29 December 2005, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Harding, Marriott.

Program arranged by the Committee on Academic Freedom and Professional Rights and Responsibilities.

Presiding: Lisa Justine Hernandez, Saint Edward’s University.

  • “Web Serfing? Toward Ethical Internet Pedagogies,” Olin Bjork, University of Texas, Austin
  • “Can Antiplagiarism Databases Be Compatible with Student Intellectual Property Rights?” Cory Lock, Saint Edward’s University
  • “Is There a Review Board for This Web Site? The Ethical Use of Human Subjects,” Jeanne Marie Rose, Penn State University, Berks

470: Electronic Media in Nineteenth-Century American Studies

Thursday, 29 December 2005, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Roosevelt, Marriott.

Program arranged by the Division on Nineteenth-Century American Literature.

Presiding: Sharon M. Harris, University of Connecticut, Storrs.

  • “Scholarship in the Digital World: Preparing for the Future,” Scott Ellis, Southern Connecticut State University
  • “Real Life Experiences with Virtual Publishing: Publishing Henry James’s Correspondence Online,” Pierre A. Walker, Salem State College
  • “The Collective: Electronic Scholarship on Early and Antebellum Women Writers,” Sharon M. Harris

493: Digital Scholarly Publishing: Beyond the Crisis

Thursday, 29 December 2005, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Maryland Suite C, Marriott.

Program arranged by the National Council of Teachers of English.

Presiding: Kristine Blair, Bowling Green State University.

  • “Carnival in the Commons: New Directions and Old Challenges for Online Scholarly Publishing,” Clancy A. Ratliff, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
  • “From Print to Nodes to Nets: The Writing Instructor’s Third Wave,” David Blakesley, Purdue University, West Lafayette
  • “Digital Rhetorical Practices and Academic Labor in Emerging Multimedia Scholarship,” Mary Hocks, Georgia State University

Respondent: Kristine Blair.

496: Literary Theory and the Electronic Text

Thursday, 29 December 2005, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Caucus, Washington Hilton.

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Computer Studies in Language and Literature.

Presiding: Susan Schreibman, University of Maryland, College Park.

  • “Dressing Dada, Loving Dada, Living Dada … Again: Reproducing Performance in the Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven Digital Archive,” Tanya Clement, University of Maryland, College Park
  • “The End of the Irrelevant Text: Electronic Texts, Linguistics, and Literary Theory,” David L. Hoover, New York University
  • “Open-Ended: Critical Theory and the New Textuality,” Jon A. Saklofske, Acadia University; Struan Sinclair, University of Manitoba

511: Editing New Media

Thursday, 29 December 2005, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Maryland Suite C, Marriott.

Program arranged by the Division on Methods of Literary Research.

Presiding: Neil Fraistat, University of Maryland, College Park.

  • “Toward Scholarly, Critical, and Variorum Editions of Computer Programs,” Nick Montfort, University of Pennsylvania
  • “Film and Textual Scholarship,” Stephen Mamber, University of California, Los Angeles
  • “Video Games and Textual Studies,” Steven E. Jones, Loyola University, Chicago

516: Taking It Digital: Teaching Literature in the Twenty-First Century

Thursday, 29 December 2005, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Caucus, Washington Hilton.

A special session.

Presiding: Anne Frances Wysocki, Michigan Technological University.

  • “Using New Media to Study Literature: The Tempest Multimedia Project,” Olin Bjork, University of Texas, Austin
  • “Liter@ry Semin@rs : The Interactive Contemporary French Novel,” Alain-Philippe Durand, University of Rhode Island
  • “The (Short) Stories We Tell: Connecting Communities through Literature on the World Wide Web,” Mary Michele Bendel-Simso, McDaniel College; Julianne Jasken, McDaniel College

For copies of abstracts, visit www2.mcdaniel.edu/English/mlaproposal.htm.

519: Scale and Scholarship in the Digital Humanities

Thursday, 29 December 2005, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Eisenhower, Marriott.

Program arranged by the Association for Computers and the Humanities.

Presiding: Andrea Laue, University of Virginia.

  • “A Million for One,” Erika Linke, Carnegie Mellon University
  • “Looking Back and Looking Forward: Converted Text at the Library of Congress,” Michael Neubert, Library of Congress
  • “A Faithful Narrative of the Surprising Work of Creating an Online Jonathan Edwards,” Caleb J. D. Maskell, Yale University
  • “Flexible Encoding for Search, Comparison, and Analysis,” Andrea Laue

For copies of abstracts, visit www.ach.org/mla/mla05/.


569: Making Texts Available: Translations, Editions, and Electronic Media

Thursday, 29 December 2005, 7:15–8:30 p.m., Thoroughbred, Washington Hilton.

Program arranged by the Division on Comparative Studies in Medieval Literature.

Presiding: Jeanette Mary Scott Beer, Purdue University, West Lafayette.

Speakers: Christopher C. Baswell, University of California, Los Angeles; Albrecht Classen, University of Arizona; Hoyt N. Duggan, University of Virginia; Robert M. Stein, State University of New York, Purchase.

597: Teaching Advanced Courses in Technical Communication

Thursday, 29 December 2005, 7:15–8:30 p.m., Eisenhower, Marriott.

Program arranged by the Association of Teachers of Technical Writing.

Presiding: Sam A. Dragga, Jr., Texas Tech University.

  • “Technology and Technical Writing: It’s Not What We Teach but How We Teach It,” Rebecca Worley, University of Delaware, Newark
  • “Texts, Technê, and Technology: Identifying the Goals of Advanced Technical Communication Courses,” Susan E. Thomas, University of Sydney
  • “Cross-Global and Cross-Disciplinary Challenges in the Global Classroom Project,” TyAnna K. Herrington, Georgia Institute of Technology

For copies of abstracts, write to denise.tillery@ccmail.nevada.edu.

599: Writing Program Administration and (Multi)Media

Thursday, 29 December 2005, 7:15–8:30 p.m., Hoover, Marriott.

Program arranged by the Council of Writing Program Administrators.

Presiding: Shirley Rose, Purdue University, West Lafayette.

  • “The More Things Change,” Deborah H. Holdstein, Northern Illinois University
  • “Breaking (the) News: Changing Stories about Writing and Writers through the WPA Network for Media Action,” Linda Adler-Kassner, Eastern Michigan University
  • “Coming Soon to a Writing Program near You,” Todd W. Taylor, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • “Multimedia Archives and the Documentation of the WPA’s Intellectual Work,” Shirley Rose

600: The State of American Writing: Perspectives Popular and Professional

Thursday, 29 December 2005, 7:15–8:30 p.m., Kennedy, Marriott.

Program arranged by the Conference on College Composition and Communication.

Presiding: Douglas Dean Hesse, Illinois State University.

  • “Meet the Press: Reading News Coverage of Research on Writing,” Peter Leslie Mortensen, University of Illinois, Urbana
  • “Well Beyond the Basics: The Rise of the Writing Major,” Susan H. McLeod, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • “‘… to Create, Analyze, and Transform Information and to Interact Effectively with Others’: Digital Compositions and/against Expectations of the Twenty-First-Century Worker,” Anne Frances Wysocki, Michigan Technological University

665: Textual Analysis: What’s Data Got to Do with It?

Friday, 30 December 2005, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Roosevelt, Marriott.

Program arranged by the Committee on Information Technology.

Presiding: Maureen Jameson, State University of New York, Buffalo.

  • “Lies, Damn Lies, and Good Literary Criticism,” Stephen J. Ramsay, University of Georgia
  • “The Semantic Engine and the Literary Analysis Tool Kit,” Aaron Coburn, Middlebury College
  • “Forensic Stylistics and Statement Analysis,” James R. Fitzgerald, Federal Bureau of Investigation

For copies of abstracts, visit rll.buffalo.edu/rll/MLA2005/.


719: Professional Communication II: Looking into the Future

Friday, 30 December 2005, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Roosevelt, Marriott.

Program arranged by the Association for Business Communication.

Presiding: Katherine V. Wills, Indiana University–Purdue University, Columbus.

  • “Profiles of the Future: An Inquiry into the Limits of Technical Communication,” Kellie Rae Carter, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
  • “The Business of Blogging: How Web Logs Are Changing the Face of Corporate Communications,” Quinn Warnick, Iowa State University
  • “Mapping Our Field for Worldwide Audiences,” Geoffrey Sauer, Iowa State University
  • “Pedagogical Hybrids for Professional Communication: Merging Client-Based Models with Service Learning,” Jeanne Marie Rose, Penn State University, Berks

For copies of abstracts, visit www.businesscommunication.org.

736: Computer Literacy: Assessing the Impact of IT on English Literature Teaching and Research

Friday, 30 December 2005, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Park Tower Suite 8209, Marriott.

Program arranged by the Association for Computers and the Humanities.

Presiding: Paul Vetch, King’s College London.

  • “E Is for English: Pedagogy and New Technology in the Classroom,” Ian Gadd, Bath Spa University College
  • “What eLearning Has Taught Us: Scoping the Use and Effectiveness of Learning Technologies in the Teaching of Literature,” Brett Lucas, Higher Education Academy
  • “The Changing (Inter)Face of Literary Research,” Paul Vetch

For copies of abstracts, visit www.ach.org/mla/mla05/.


757: Morris and Modern Theories

Friday, 30 December 2005, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Eisenhower, Marriott.

Program arranged by the William Morris Society.

Presiding: Florence S. Boos, University of Iowa.

  • “Toward a Postmodern Theory of Production: Baudrillard, Marx, and Morris,” Martin Alan Danahay, Brock University
  • “Morris’s Poetry: (Hyper)Text and Desire,” Rosie Miles, University of Wolverhampton
  • “William Morris, F. Holland Day, and the Invention of an Aestheticist-Decadent American Publishing Tradition,” Richard Allen Kaye, Hunter College, City University of New York

For copies of abstracts, write florence-boos@uiowa.edu.

785: Archival and Electronic Irish Studies

Friday, 30 December 2005, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Hoover, Marriott.

Program arranged by the American Conference for Irish Studies.

Presiding: Margaret Kelleher, National University of Ireland, Maynooth.

  • “Rethinking Irish National Literary History: The Cambridge History of Irish Literature,” Margaret Kelleher; Philip Thomas O’Leary, Boston College
  • “Exploring the Edith Oenone Somerville Archive at Drishane,” Claire Denelle Cowart, Southeastern Louisiana University
  • “Off the Record with Louis Stewart: Panning the ‘net for Serious Gold,” Thomas O’Grady, University of Massachusetts, Boston

793: Technical Communication Research beyond the Classroom: Methods for Making Knowledge in the World

Friday, 30 December 2005, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Park Tower Suite 8209, Marriott.

Program arranged by the Association of Teachers of Technical Writing.

Presiding: Stephen Bernhardt, University of Delaware, Newark.

  • “The Practice of Usability: Researching Student-Community Collaboration on User Involvement,” J. Blake Scott, University of Central Florida
  • “Investigations into Computer Program Source Code: A New Area for Technical Communications Study,” Clinton Lanier, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces
  • “Internet-Mediated Research Using Surveys and Content Analyses,” John Killoran, University of Colorado, Denver
  • “Embedded Choices: Cultural Mediators and the Making of Knowledge in Professional Writing Narratives of Technology,” Richard C. Hay, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

For copies of abstracts, write to denise.tillery@ccmail.nevada.edu.

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