Conferences Modern Language Association Digital Humanities Sessions

Guide to Humanities-Computing Talks at the 2004 MLA Convention

The Association for Computers and the Humanities has compiled this list of sessions with computing-related talks at the 2004 Modern Language Association Convention (in Philadelphia, from December 27 through 30). Some of these sessions contain only one or two computing-related talks, but this list includes the entire program for each session.

In most cases you must pay the convention-registration fee in order to attend any of these talks. But two sessions are free and open to the public: “Plagiarism and the Internet” and “Medieval Manuscripts in the Digital Age”. MLA talks are published at the discretion of their authors; if you want to obtain the text of a talk you were unable to attend, the best method is to contact the author directly.

Although the 2004 convention is now in the past, this information will remain available, as a record of what went on. Similar information for many other years is available via the main page on ACH MLA sessions.

Corrections and additions are welcome; please send them to John.Lavagnino@kcl.ac.uk.


Summary of Sessions

Monday, 27 December 2004

5:15–6:30 p.m.

7:00–8:15 p.m.

8:45–10:00 p.m.

Tuesday, 28 December 2004

8:30–9:45 a.m.

10:15–11:30 a.m.

12:00 noon–1:15 p.m.

1:45–3:00 p.m.

3:30–4:45 p.m.

7:15–8:30 p.m.

Wednesday, 29 December 2004

8:30–9:45 a.m.

10:15–11:30 a.m.

12:00 noon–1:15 p.m.

3:30–4:45 p.m.

5:15–6:30 p.m.

9:00–10:15 p.m.

Thursday, 30 December 2004

8:30–9:45 a.m.

10:15–11:30 a.m.

12:00 noon–1:15 p.m.

1:45–3:00 p.m.


15: Print History, Posthistory, and Vilém Flusser

Monday, 27 December 2004, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Adams, Loews Philadelphia

A special session

Session leader: Anke Karen Finger, University of Connecticut, Storrs

  • “Derrida and Flusser: On the Concept of Writing and the End of Linearity,” Rainer Guldin, Università della Svizzera Italiana
  • “Flusser, Print, and Digital Culture,” Mark Poster, University of California, Irvine
  • “The Twilight of the Alphabet: Vilém Flusser’s Cultural Criticism,” Andreas Stroehl, International Film Festival, Munich

Respondent: Anke Karen Finger


24: The Perils of Databases for Studying Language Change

Monday, 27 December 2004, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 308, Philadelphia Marriott

Program arranged by the Division on Language Change.

  • “Big Bangs, Outliers, and Red Herrings: Reliability and Historical Corpora,” Anne L. Curzan, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • “Traversing Corpora: Tracking Auxiliary Verb Changes from Old to Middle English,” Felicia Jean Steele, College of New Jersey
  • “Looking for the Right Search: New Ways of Reading Language and Literature,” Chris Palmer, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

35: Toward a History of Globalism

Monday, 27 December 2004, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 203-B, Convention Center

Program arranged by the Division on Twentieth-Century German Literature.

Presiding: Friederike U. Eigler, Georgetown University

  • “A German Century? Globalization and the Failure of ‘Kultur,’” Frank Trommler, University of Pennsylvania
  • “Globalization, Benjamin’s Passagen-Werk, and Metropolitan Culture: New Questions for German Studies,” Rolf Johannes Goebel, University of Alabama, Huntsville
  • “Globalization, the Internet, and German Culture,” Scott G. Williams, University of Texas, Arlington

44: Journals as Innovators and the Innovation of Journals

Monday, 27 December 2004, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 411–412, Philadelphia Marriott

Program arranged by the Council of Editors of Learned Journals.

Presiding: David Cox Hanson, Southeastern Louisiana University

  • “CELJ Annual Awards Presentation,” Jana L. Argersinger, Washington State University, Pullman
  • “Starting, Killing, and Reviving Journals,” Willis Regier, University of Illinois Press
  • “Scholarly Journals in the Digital Age: Old versus New Forms of Inquiry,” James F. English, University of Pennsylvania

Respondent: Linda Veronika Troost, Washington and Jefferson College


52: The Future of Franco-American Relations: Que Faire?

Monday, 27 December 2004, 8:45–10:00 p.m., Washington B, Loews Philadelphia

A special session

Session leader: Rosemarie Scullion, University of Iowa

  • “Electronic Relations: Between Hope and Fear,” Pierre Simon Taminiaux, Georgetown University
  • “Anti-anti-Americanism and French Intellectuals: Glucksman et Compagnie,” Richard Golsan, Texas A&M University, College Station
  • “Cataclysmic Relations: Franco-American Discord in Diane Johnson’s L’Affaire,” Carolyn Ann Durham, College of Wooster
  • “‘Why Are the French So …?’: Facing French Culture in the Undergraduate Classroom,” Charles J. Stivale, Wayne State University

64: Plagiarism and the Internet

Tuesday, 28 December 2004, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 202-B, Pennsylvania Convention Center

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Academic Freedom and Professional Rights and Responsibilities.

Presiding: Andrew C. Parker, Amherst College

  • “Engaging Plagiarism,” Michael Hanrahan, Bates College
  • “The Economics of Authorship: Online Paper Mills, Student Writers, and First-Year Composition,” Kelly Allison Ritter, Southern Connecticut State University
  • “Academic Net-work: Collaboration and Intellectual Property,” Elliot H. Shapiro, Cornell University

Respondent: Peter J. Vandenberg, DePaul University

92: Cluelessness and Difference in the Literature Classroom

Tuesday, 28 December 2004, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 203-B, Pennsylvania Convention Center

Program arranged by the Division on the Teaching of Literature.

Presiding: Marcy Ellen Schwartz, Rutgers University, New Brunswick

  • “Overwhelmed by the World: Teaching Literature and the ‘Difference’ of Nations,” Rajini Srikanth, University of Massachusetts, Boston
  • “Reading What We Are Not: White Male Readers in the Lands of the ‘Other,’” Pennie J. Ticen, Virginia Military Institute
  • “Cluelessness and the Queer Studies Classroom,” Donald E. Hall, West Virginia University, Morgantown
  • “New Spaces, New Media: Bringing Africa and Film into the Literature Classroom,” Rachel T. Gabara, Princeton University

99: Inscribing Media: New American Discourse Networks

Tuesday, 28 December 2004, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 204-A, Pennsylvania Convention Center

A special session

  • “What Next? Dictation and Spectral Literacy in The Turn of the Screw,” Patricia Anne Crain, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
  • “From MSS to Mississippi: Visual Technology and Textual Production, 1883,” Lisa Gitelman, Catholic University of America
  • “From A to 01011010: ASCII and the Alphabetization of Electronic Space,” Matthew Gary Kirschenbaum, University of Maryland, College Park

110: The Shakespeare Variorum: From Furness to Cyberspace

Tuesday, 28 December 2004, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 307, Philadelphia Marriott

Program arranged by the Committee on the New Variorum Edition of Shakespeare.

Presiding: Georgianna Ziegler, Folger Shakespeare Library

  • “The Philadelphia Variorum,” Richard Alan John Knowles, University of Wisconsin, Madison
  • “Book into Data: The Electronic NVS,” Julia H. Flanders, Brown University

116: Concretism and Beyond: A Tribute to Haroldo de Campos

Tuesday, 28 December 2004, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Commonwealth Hall D, Loews Philadelphia

Program arranged by the Division on Luso-Brazilian Language and Literature.

Presiding: Christopher John Dunn, Tulane University

  • “Haroldo de Campos and the Poetics of Invention,” Kenneth David Jackson, Yale University
  • “Antilyrical Moments and Movements in Modern Portuguese Poetry: Surrealism, Concretism, ‘Poesia 61,’ and Beyond,” Antonio Costa Ladeira, Texas Tech University
  • “Haroldo de Campos’s ‘Planetary Music for Mortal Ears’: A Latin American ‘Postmodern/Global’ Poetics,” Odile Cisneros, University of Alberta
  • “Interpoetic Intermediation: Concretism and Brazilian Digital Poetry,” Christopher T. Funkhouser, New Jersey Institute of Technology

124: Las fronteras del estudio mexicanista, el estudio mexicanista de la frontera

Tuesday, 28 December 2004, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Jefferson, Loews Philadelphia

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Mexican Cultural and Literary Studies.

Presiding: Debra Ann Castillo, Cornell University

  • “Online en la línea: Books, Blogs, and Belonging to a (Border) Literary Community,” Paul F. Fallon, East Carolina University
  • “Missing: The Dark Side of Free Trade,” Stuart Alexander Day, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • “The United States–Mexico Border as Cemetery in Films Made 2000–03,” Isabel Arredondo, State University of New York, Plattsburgh

129: On Truth and Lying in a Contemporary Sense

Tuesday, 28 December 2004, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 203-B, Pennsylvania Convention Center

A special session

Session leader: Gregory Flaxman, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

  • “White Lies,” Jean-Michel Rabaté, University of Pennsylvania
  • “Identity Theft or Digital Lies?” Mark Poster, University of California, Irvine
  • “You’ve Got Mail!—from the Dalai Lama: The New Age Online,” Catherine Liu, Bard College

133: Poster Session: Exemplary Digital Scholarship

Tuesday, 28 December 2004, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 204-B, Pennsylvania Convention Center

Program arranged by the Committee on Information Technology.

Presiding: David Hiple, University of Hawai‘i, Manoa

Speakers: Mary Ann Lyman-Hager, San Diego State University; Gilberte Furstenberg, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Irene S. Thompson, University of Florida; June K. Phillips, Weber State University


153: Best Staffing Practices and Instructional Effectiveness

Tuesday, 28 December 2004, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 304, Philadelphia Marriott

Program arranged by the Committee on Academic Freedom and Professional Rights and Responsibilities.

Presiding: Suzanne S. Hintz, Northern Virginia Community College, Woodbridge Campus

  • “How Learning Communities Create Change on the Edge of Chaos: Invitations to Change,” Pam Narney, Northern Virginia Community College, Woodbridge Campus
  • “Visible and Transparent: Using the Web to Promote Effectiveness,” Barclay Barrios, Rutgers University, New Brunswick
  • “Fiscal Responsibility and Instructional Effectiveness: Complementary or Contradictory?” Suzanne S. Hintz

177: Community College Scholarship: Highlighting Exemplary Projects

Tuesday, 28 December 2004, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 413, Philadelphia Marriott

Program arranged by the Community College Humanities Association.

Presiding: Stacey Lee Donohue, Central Oregon Community College

  • “Use of a Mayan Literary Expression Web Page,” Ann L. Sittig, Metropolitan Community College, NE
  • “Montgomery Scholars Program: Core and Capstone,” Mary Furgol, Montgomery College, Rockville, MD

Respondent: George Louis Scheper, Community College of Baltimore County, MD


213: Constellations II: The Social Life of Aesthetic Forms

Tuesday, 28 December 2004, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 304, Philadelphia Marriott

Program arranged by the Division on Sociological Approaches to Literature.

Presiding: Silvia L. López, Carleton College

  • “Temporal Constellations and Object Contaminations: Walter Benjamin Meets Daniel Spoerri,” Cecilia Novero, Penn State University, University Park
  • “The Novel as Catalog: Epic Ambition in Peter Weiss’s The Aesthetic of Resistance,” Ole Rehberg Gram, Miami University, Oxford
  • “Remedial Materialism: Constellation and the Political Economy of Electronic Literature,” John David Zuern, University of Hawai‘i, Manoa
  • “The Constellation in Art: The 3-D Video Game and Multinational Culture,” Dennis R. Redmond, University of Oregon

Respondent: Carsten Strathausen, University of Missouri, Columbia


234: The Material Electronic Text

Tuesday, 28 December 2004, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 406, Philadelphia Marriott

Program arranged by the Association for Computers and the Humanities.

Presiding: Aimée H. Morrison, University of Waterloo

  • “Archives of Empire and the Promise of Open Source,” Jack Shuler, Graduate Center, City University of New York
  • “Hypertext (Re)Visions: Rescuing the Literary Annual from Material Obscurity,” Katherine Diane Harris, Graduate Center, City University of New York
  • “Continuous Paper,” Nick Montfort, University of Pennsylvania

For further information, visit www.ach.org/mla/mla04.

242: Lyric and Media

Tuesday, 28 December 2004, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Grand Ballroom Salon I, Philadelphia Marriott

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Media and Literature.

Presiding: Richard Menke, University of Georgia

  • One Hundred Thousand Billion Sonnets and How Many Meanings?” Florentina Vasilescu, University of Montreal
  • “Lyric Bulletins: Poetry and News in the United States Civil War,” Eliza Clark Richards, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • “Lyric/Antilyric, Blog/Antiblog: Reading the Blog-Built Self through the Lyric Subject,” Lisa L. Lynch, Catholic University of America

266: Primary Documents and the Web

Tuesday, 28 December 2004, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 307, Philadelphia Marriott

Program arranged by the Association for Documentary Editing.

Presiding: Elizabeth Dow, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

  • “Primary Documents: The Challenge for Teachers,” Carol Conrad, Bullis School
  • “Primary Documents: The Challenge for Archivists and Librarians,” Elizabeth Dow
  • “Primary Documents: The Challenge for Scholars,” David Chesnutt, University of South Carolina, Columbia

315: General Session on Applied Linguistics

Tuesday, 28 December 2004, 7:15–8:30 p.m., Tubman, Loews Philadelphia

Program arranged by the Division on Applied Linguistics.

  • “Changing Campus Attitudes toward Foreign Language Study,” Audrey A. Fisch, New Jersey City University; Donna M. Farina, New Jersey City University
  • “Intercultural Communication at the Intersection of Context, Genre, and Agency: The Grammatical Choice of Mood and Modality in an Internet Chat,” Nina Vyatkina, Penn State University, University Park

319: Learning for Life: Producing and Becoming Lifelong Learners

Tuesday, 28 December 2004, 7:15–8:30 p.m., 401–403, Philadelphia Marriott

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on the Two-Year College.

Presiding: William Tell Gifford, Truckee Meadows Community College, NV

  • “‘Epiphanies’ and the Lifelong Learner,” Dale F. Salwak, Citrus College, CA
  • “Lessons from Lifelong Learners: A Reflection on the Mousepads and Memoirs Web Site Project,” Beth Counihan, Graduate Center, City University of New York
  • “(Ree)Valu(at)ing Professional Development: The Budget Be Damned!” Thom D. Chesney, Collin County Community College, TX

Respondent: Amy R. Leal, Graduate Center, City University of New York


358: Computer-Mediated Foreign Language Study

Wednesday, 29 December 2004, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Adams, Loews Philadelphia

Program arranged by the Division on Applied Linguistics.

Presiding: Julie Anne Belz, Penn State University, University Park

  • “The Effect of Question Glossing on Online Reading and Look-Up Behavior,” Christina Overstreet, University of Florida
  • “Comparative Perspectives on Computer-Mediated Communication on Foreign Language Learning: Structural-Cognitive and Sociocognitive Insights,” Jonathon Reinhardt, Penn State University, University Park

375: Technologies of the Self

Wednesday, 29 December 2004, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Grand Ballroom Salon I, Philadelphia Marriott

Program arranged by the Division on Autobiography, Biography, and Life Writing.

Presiding: Mary Jean Corbett, Miami University, Oxford

  • “Neurorhetorics: Articulating Life during the Great Antidepression,” Jeffrey A. Pruchnic, Penn State University, University Park
  • “New Media Autobiography and the Differently Gendered Self: Transgender Home Pages,” Kimberly J. Surkan, Minnesota State University, Mankato
  • “Autobiography and the Internet: Representations of Self in a Posthuman Era,” Jeffrey D. Wallen, Hampshire College

416: Digital Tools

Wednesday, 29 December 2004, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Grand Ballroom Salon I, Philadelphia Marriott

Program arranged by the Division on Methods of Literary Research.

Presiding: Neil Fraistat, University of Maryland, College Park

  • “Conceptual Tools for the Humanities in Digital Contexts,” Johanna Drucker, University of Virginia
  • “Getting out of the Tool Box,” Matthew Gary Kirschenbaum, University of Maryland, College Park
  • “Sound Tools for Sound Listening: Poetry’s Coming Digital Present,” Charles Bernstein, University of Pennsylvania

438: Teaching Golden Age Poetry: Challenges, Choices, and Strategies

Wednesday, 29 December 2004, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Washington C, Loews Philadelphia

Program arranged by the Division on Sixteenth- and Seventeenth-Century Spanish Poetry and Prose.

Presiding: William Henry Clamurro, Emporia State University

  • “The Old and the New,” Edward H. Friedman, Vanderbilt University
  • “Garcilaso Goes to the Met: Fine Arts and the Hypertext Sonnet,” Steven Wagschal, Indiana University, Bloomington
  • “Modeling Intertextuality through the Use of Hypertext,” Ignacio E. Navarrete, University of California, Berkeley

515: Evaluating Teaching and Scholarship in New Media

Wednesday, 29 December 2004, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Washington C, Loews Philadelphia

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Information Technology.

Presiding: Kenneth M. Price, University of Nebraska, Lincoln

  • “Mixing It Up: Digital Arts and Digital Literature,” N. Katherine Hayles, University of California, Los Angeles
  • “Establishing and Applying Best Practices in the Peer Review of New Digital Scholarship,” David Sewell, University of Virginia Press
  • “Learning Tech from Hype to Ho Hum: One Department’s Digital Dreams, Deceptions, and Occasional Disappointments,” Brooks Landon, University of Iowa

521: Cyberspace and Eastern Europe

Wednesday, 29 December 2004, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Congress A, Loews Philadelphia

Program arranged by the Division on Slavic and East European Literatures.

Presiding: Terence Odlin, Ohio State University, Columbus

  • “An Icon of Globalization: Using the Web to Represent Saint Petersburg,” Terence Odlin
  • “Exorcizing ‘Semiotic Ghosts’ of the Past: Literary Cyberpunk in Russia,” Irene Sywenky, University of Alberta
  • “Hackers Are Us: A Hayride through the Russian Cyberspace,” Inna V. Caron, Ohio State University, Columbus

555: Cash Bar Arranged by the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women and the Brown University Women Writers Project

Wednesday, 29 December 2004, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Commonwealth Hall B, Loews Philadelphia


608: Smart Classrooms, Hybrid Courses, and the Teaching of Languages

Wednesday, 29 December 2004, 9:00–10:15 p.m., Congress C, Loews Philadelphia

Program arranged by the Division on the Teaching of Language.

Presiding: Marjorie O. Tussing, California State University, Fullerton

  • “Teaching Intermediate French Online in the Smart Classroom,” Christopher J. Ippolito, University of the Pacific
  • “A New Hybrid Course: Teaching Spanish with Mallard,” Emily E. Scida, University of Virginia
  • “Instructor-Developed Web Pages and the Teaching of Language,” Alexander Waid, United States Coast Guard Academy

624: Other Longings: Nostalgia as Cultural Industry

Wednesday, 29 December 2004, 9:00–10:15 p.m., 307, Philadelphia Marriott

A special session

Session leader: Narin F. Hassan, Georgia Institute of Technology

  • “The Exotification of Nostalgia or the Nostalgiafication of Exotica?” Edward K. Chan, Kennesaw State University
  • “Incidental Nostalgia: Temporality, Kitsch, and the Scopitone Jukebox,” Amy Herzog, Queens College, City University of New York
  • “Commodifying Longing: eBay as Nostalgia Machine,” Patricia Ventura, Georgia Institute of Technology

633: Anime and Manga: Animated/Graphic Human/Nature

Thursday, 30 December 2004, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Jefferson, Loews Philadelphia

Program arranged by the Division on Literature and Science.

Presiding: Pamela Sue Gossin, University of Texas, Dallas

  • “Anime and East Asian Culture: Neon Genesis Evangelion,” Dennis R. Redmond, University or Oregon
  • “An Engineering Meditation to Culture: Mecha, Apocalypse, and the Birth of a Cybernetic Order in Japanese Anime,” Joseph Murphy, University of Florida
  • “Saint Francis the Robot: Reconciliations of Nature and Technoculture in the Work of Hayao Miyazaki,” Anthony Lioi, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

635: Medieval Manuscripts in the Digital Age

Thursday, 30 December 2004, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Washington C, Loews Philadelphia

Program arranged by the Division on French Medieval Language and Literature.

Presiding: Michel-André Bossy, Brown University

  • “Alluring Electronic Editions Are Good Pedagogical Tools,” Amy Victoria Ogden, University of Virginia
  • “Opening the Archives: A Tools-Based Approach to Teaching Textual Criticism,” Andrew Ross, Brown University
  • “Technology, Manuscripts, and the Renewal of Philology,” Molly C. Robinson Kelly, Lewis and Clark College
  • “Text Editing in a Distance-Research Environment,” Barbara K. Altmann, University of Oregon

657: It’s 2010—Do You Know Where Your Data Is? Open Standards for Technology in the Academy

Thursday, 30 December 2004, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Grand Ballroom Salon I, Philadelphia Marriott

Program arranged by the Committee on Information Technology.

Presiding: Julia H. Flanders, Brown University

  • “The Open Source Movement and Higher Education: Consequences for the Humanities,” Saul Fisher, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
  • “Open Source Software: Quality Learning, Improved Productivity, or a Distraction?” James Farmer, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • “‘What I Assume You Shall Assume’: The Whitman Archive and the Challenge of Integrating Different Open Standards,” Kenneth M. Price, University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Brett Barney, University of Nebraska, Lincoln

658: Computing, Theorizing, Communicating

Thursday, 30 December 2004, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Jefferson, Loews Philadelphia

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Computer Studies in Language and Literature.

Presiding: Donald E. Hardy, Colorado State University

  • “Rethinking Poetry by Teaching It Online,” Ian Lancashire, University of Toronto, New College
  • “Elucidating the Relation between Linguistic Form and Literary Function Using Text-Analysis Software,” Deborah Keogh, Trinity College Dublin
  • “Re-tooling Research and Re-searching Tools: The Interplay between Methods and Results,” David L. Hoover, New York University

For copies of abstracts, visit textant.colostate.edu/mla2004/abstracts.htm.

660: Race-ing New Media

Thursday, 30 December 2004, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Congress A, Loews Philadelphia

Program arranged by the Division on Popular Culture.

Presiding: Jennifer DeVere Brody, Northwestern University

  • “Forget Virtuality: Alternative Configurations of Cyberspace,” Jillana B. Enteen, Northwestern University
  • “Cybernetic Circuits: The Cultural Crossing of Machinima,” Beth M. Coleman, New York University
  • “Confessions of an Afrogeek,” Anna Everett, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • “The Cyberjunkie and Cyberporn Princess: Reflections on the Virtual Reality of a Subjectless Asian American Critique,” Rachel C. Lee, University of California, Los Angeles

679: Literary Linguistics: Toward a Definition

Thursday, 30 December 2004, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Washington C, Loews Philadelphia

Program arranged by the Division on Linguistic Approaches to Literature.

Presiding: Todd Van Evera Oakley, Case Western Reserve University

  • “Toward a Definition of Literary Linguistics,” Milton M. Azevedo, University of California, Berkeley
  • “In the Supermarket of Language: What Corpus Linguists Can Learn from Experimental Poetry,” Claiborne Rice, University of Louisiana, Lafayette
  • “Optimality Theory, Borges, and Hoaxes: Modeling the Act of Reading as a Pragmatic Process of Constraint Satisfaction,” Lynda C. Walsh, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology
  • “The Pragmatic Author: Comparing Pragmatic Constraints on Linguistic Choices in Everyday Use and in Literary Texts,” Sharon A. Cote, James Madison University

728: Digital Preservation and Electronic Scholarly Editions

Thursday, 30 December 2004, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 404, Philadelphia Marriott

Program arranged by the Association for Computers and the Humanities.

Presiding: David Lee Gants, University of New Brunswick

  • “The Text Creation Partnership (TCP): Building a Foundation for Preserving E-Texts,” Shawn Martin, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • “Printing on Acid-Free Electrons: Scholarly Publishers and the Renegotiation of Responsibilities in Electronic Editions,” David Sewell, University of Virginia Press
  • “Preservation through Evolution: The Advantages of Just-in-Time Markup,” Graham Barwell, University of Wollongong

For further information, visit www.ach.org/mla/mla04.


754: Scholarly Journals: Our Futures in the Digital Soup

Thursday, 30 December 2004, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Liberty Ballroom Salon A, Philadelphia Marriott

Program arranged by the Council of Editors of Learned Journals.

Presiding: David Cox Hanson, Southeastern Louisiana University

  • “The Future of Scholarly Communication in the Humanities: Adaptation or Transformation?” Rick Johnson, Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition
  • “Libraries and Learned Journals in the Digital Soup Together,” Anne Garrison, Swarthmore College
  • “Digitopia,” R. Allen Shoaf, University of Florida

Respondent: Bonnie Wheeler, Southern Methodist University

758: Electronic Publishing and Feminist Practice

Thursday, 30 December 2004, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Washington C, Loews Philadelphia

Program arranged by the Society for Medieval Feminist Scholarship.

Presiding: Michelle M. Sauer, Minot State University

  • “Medieval Women’s Bibliography: Making Connections, Building Community with the Feminae Web Site,” Margaret Schaus, Haverford College
  • “Medieval Women in the Digital Age,” Madeleine Jeay, McMaster University; Kathleen Garay, McMaster University
  • “Sisterhood Is Powerful in Cyberspace: Feminist Best Practices for Electronic Collaboration,” Lisa M. Bitel, University of Southern California

Respondent: Gerard Peter NeCastro, University of Maine, Machias

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