Conferences Modern Language Association Digital Humanities Sessions

Guide to Humanities-Computing Talks at the 2002 MLA Convention

The Association for Computers and the Humanities has compiled this list of sessions with computing-related talks at the 2002 Modern Language Association Convention (in New York City, from December 27 through 30). Some of these sessions contain only one or two computing-related talks, but this list includes the entire program for each session.

In most cases you must pay the convention-registration fee in order to attend any of these talks. But one session is free and open to the public: “Copyright and Fair Use in the Electronic Environment”. MLA talks are published at the discretion of their authors; if you want to obtain the text of a talk you were unable to attend, the best method is to contact the author directly.

Although the 2002 convention is now in the past, this information will remain available, as a record of what went on. Similar information for many other years is available via the main page on ACH MLA sessions.

Corrections and additions are welcome; please send them to John.Lavagnino@kcl.ac.uk.


Summary of Sessions

Friday, 27 December 2002

7:00 to 8:15 p.m.

8:45 to 10:00 p.m.

Saturday, 28 December 2002

8:30 to 9:45 a.m.

10:15 to 11:30 a.m.

Noon to 1:15 p.m.

1:45 to 3:00 p.m.

3:30 to 4:45 p.m.

7:15 to 8:30 p.m.

Sunday, 29 December 2002

8:30 to 9:45 a.m.

Noon to 1:15 p.m.

1:45 to 3:00 p.m.

3:30 to 4:45 p.m.

9:00 to 10:15 p.m.

Monday, 30 December 2002

8:30 to 9:45 a.m.

10:15 to 11:30 a.m.

Noon to 1:15 p.m.

1:45 to 3:00 p.m.

Other events and activities


58: Foreign Language Distance Learning at Different Levels

Friday, 27 December 2002, 7:00 to 8:15 p.m., Conference E, Sheraton New York

Program arranged by the Association of Departments of Foreign Languages. Presiding: Michael R. Katz, Middlebury College

  • “Learning without Borders: A United States–Mexico Business and Culture Simulation,” Roberta Z. Lavine, University of Maryland, College Park
  • “The Best of Both: Upper-Level Hybrid Courses,” Annette Kym, Hunter College, City University of New York
  • “Online Professional Development: An MA in Curriculum and Instruction,” Joan Keck Campbell, German Online Distance Education Network

59: Looking Back on the Future History of the “Book”

Friday, 27 December 2002, 7:00 to 8:15 p.m., Concourse B, Hilton New York

Program arranged by the Council of Editors of Learned Journals. Presiding: Michael E. Cornett, Duke University

  • “CELJ Annual Journal Awards Presentation,” David Cox Hanson, Southeastern Louisiana University
  • “What Is a ‘Book’? Post-Foucauldian Ruminations,” David C. Greetham, Graduate Center, City University of New York
  • “Should We Read Pages as Pixels and Pixels as Pages or Not?” George J. Bornstein, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Respondent: Jana L. Argersinger, Washington State University, Pullman


61: Reading Models in Twentieth-Century France

Friday, 27 December 2002, 8:45 to 10:00 p.m., Carnegie 2, Sheraton New York

Program arranged by the Division on Twentieth-Century French Literature. Presiding: Steven Winspur, University of Wisconsin, Madison

  • “Reading the Note-book (Chappuis, du Bouchet, Jaccottet, Perros),” Ariane Luethi, University of Zurich
  • “Performing an ‘Unknown Praxis’: Jazz as a Compositional Model for French Caribbean Literature,” Jason R. Herbeck, Bowling Green State University
  • “The Poem as a Kinetic and Visual Object: A Phenomenology of Reading E-Poetry,” Carrie Jaurès Noland, University of California, Irvine

Respondent: Stamos Metzidakis, Washington University

70: New Media Art and Textuality

Friday, 27 December 2002, 8:45 to 10:00 p.m., Concourse B, Hilton New York

A special session; session leader: Mark B. N. Hansen, Princeton University

  • “Matter of Time: Toward a Materialist Semiotics of Web Animation,” John David Zuern, University of Hawai‘i, Manoa
  • “The Web’s Collected Unconscious: Software Art as Automatic Writing,” Lisa L. Lynch, Catholic University
  • “Need X Change: A Collaborative System,” Sharon Daniel, University of California, Santa Cruz

Respondent: N. Katherine Hayles, University of California, Los Angeles


113: Electronic Textual Editing I

Saturday, 28 December 2002, 8:30 to 9:45 a.m., Concourse B, Hilton New York

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Scholarly Editions. Presiding: Morris E. Eaves, University of Rochester

  • “Electronic Editions: Poetry,” Neil Richard Fraistat, University of Maryland, College Park; Steven E. Jones, Loyola University, Chicago
  • “Electronic Editions: Prose Fiction,” Peter L. Shillingsburg, University of North Texas
  • “Electronic Editions: Drama,” David Lee Gants, University of Georgia

138: “Stabbed, Vandalized, and Threatened”: Responses to the Digital Art of Alma Lopez and Other Chicana Intellectual Work

Saturday, 28 December 2002, 10:15 to 11:30 a.m., Conference D, Sheraton New York

Program arranged by the Division on Chicana and Chicano Literature. Presiding: Michelle Habell-Pallán, University of Washington

Speakers: Alma Lopez, Los Angeles, CA; Chéla Sandoval, University of California, Santa Barbara; Mary Patricia Brady, Cornell University; Luz Calvo, Ohio State University, Columbus; Theresa Delgadillo, University of Notre Dame; Naomi Quiñonez, California State University, Fullerton

151: Electronic Textual Editing II

Saturday, 28 December 2002, 10:15 to 11:30 a.m., Concourse B, Hilton New York

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Scholarly Editions. Presiding: Morris E. Eaves, University of Rochester

  • “Electronic Editions: Anthologies,” Julia H. Flanders, Brown University
  • “Electronic Editions: Using Digital Facsimiles,” Kevin S. Kiernan, University of Kentucky
  • “The New MLA-CSE Guidelines for Scholarly Editions,” John Merritt Unsworth, University of Virginia; Katherine O’Brien O’Keeffe, University of Notre Dame

160: Globalization and the Image I: Imagining the Global

Saturday, 28 December 2002, 10:15 to 11:30 a.m., Conference K, Sheraton New York

Program arranged by the Society for Critical Exchange. Presiding: Martha A. Woodmansee, Case Western Reserve University

  • “Imaging and Imagining Globalization: Maps and Models,” Melba Cuddy-Keane, University of Toronto
  • “World Environments: Mapping a Postnatural Geography,” Juniper Lee Ellis, Loyola College
  • “The Intimate Sphere: Globalization and Postnational Citizenship,” Elena Pearl Glasberg, Duke University
  • “Networking against Spatial Conceptions: Thamil Eelam on the World Wide Web,” Jillana B. Enteen, Northwestern University

Papers will be available by 1 December 2002 on the SCE Web site (http://www.cwru.edu/affil/sce).


196: The Future of Manuscript Studies: Digitization and Issues of Access

Saturday, 28 December 2002, noon to 1:15 p.m., Conference K, Sheraton New York

Program arranged by the Division on Comparative Studies in Medieval Literature. Presiding: Marilynn R. Desmond, State University of New York, Binghamton

Speakers: Jonathan Alexander, New York University; Consuelo W. Dutschke, Columbia University; Richard Kenneth Emmerson, Medieval Academy; Joel W. Fredell, Southern Louisiana University; Roger S. Wieck, Morgan Library

198: New Scenarios in Latin American Theater

Saturday, 28 December 2002, noon to 1:15 p.m., Conference D, Sheraton New York

Program arranged by the Division on Twentieth-Century Latin American Literature. Presiding: Vicky Unruh, University of Kansas

  • “The Seditious Seduction of Mexico,” Stuart A. Day, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • “Divergent Acts: Performance Art and Politics in Latin America,” Diana Taylor, New York University
  • “Theater, Multimedia, and Globalization,” Claudia Villegas-Silva, University of Hawai‘i, Manoa

200: Digital Narrativity

Saturday, 28 December 2002, noon to 1:15 p.m., Nassau A and B, Hilton New York

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Media and Literature. Presiding: Eckart Voigts-Virchow, Universität Giessen, Germany

  • “Narrative Suspense and the Selection of Alternatives in Print, Cinematic, and Electronic Fictions,” Hilary P. Dannenberg, University of Freiburg, Germany
  • “Birds, Games, Boxes, and Bricolage: Interactivity in Electronic Narratives,” Marjorie Luesebrink, Irvine Valley College, CA
  • “Death of the Author? Death of the Reader!” Roberto Simanowski, University of Washington, Seattle

203: Turn-of-the-Century Catalunya: 1900 and 2000 I

Saturday, 28 December 2002, noon to 1:15 p.m., Conference H, Sheraton New York

Program arranged by the North American Catalan Society. Presiding: Mary Ann Newman, Universal Forum of Cultures, Barcelona

  • “The Occult Side of Catalunya, 1900: Esotericism and Anarchism,” Angela Bagués, Shippensburg University
  • “Women in Cyberspace: A Catalan Revolution,” Kathryn Anne Everly, Syracuse University
  • “Visions of Paris in La Vanguardia, 1890–1900,” Elena Cueto, Bowdoin College; David R. George, Bates College
  • “Transatlantic Returns: The Habanera in Catalonia, 1898–2002,” Galina Bakhtiarova, University of Southern California

204: Copyright and Fair Use in the Electronic Environment

Saturday, 28 December 2002, 1:45 to 3:30 p.m., Nassau A and B, Hilton New York

A forum arranged by the Committee on Information Technology. Presiding: Bette G. Hirsch, Cabrillo College

Speakers: Marybeth Peters, United States Register of Copyrights; Bonnie Beacher, McGraw-Hill Education; Duane E. Webster, Association of Research Libraries; Robert P. Kolker, Georgia Institute of Technology

209: Cultural Memory and Gender in Twentieth-Century East Asian Literature

Saturday, 28 December 2002, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., Conference H, Sheraton New York

Program arranged by the Division on East Asian Languages and Literatures after 1900. Presiding: Jung-Soon Shim, Soongsil University, Korea

  • “Globalizing the Contestation of Gender Roles: Using the Internet to Study the Role of Women in the History of East Asia,” Paul Anthony Wellen, National College of Business and Technology
  • “Female Trauma, Male Narrators: Narrating the Korean Comfort Women from Male Perspectives,” Seiwoong Oh, Rider University
  • “Eat, Drink, Man, and Woman: Food and Gender in ‘The Gourmet’ by Lu Wenfu,” Jin Feng, Grinnell College
  • “Gender and the Avant-Garde in Postwar Japan,” Cathy P. Steblyk, Penn State University, University Park
  • “‘She Is Grotesque’: The Culture of the Grotesque in Contemporary Korea,” Jungsoo Kim, New York University

225: Teaching American Realism: Cultures and Contexts

Saturday, 28 December 2002, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., Concourse C, Hilton New York

A special session; session leader: Jeffrey W. Miller, University of Tennessee, Martin

  • “Kinetoscopic Realism: Technology, Silent Film, and the Teaching of Naturalism,” Donna M. Campbell, Gonzaga University
  • “Teaching American Realism with Online Cultural Resources,” Kathleen L. Nichols, Pittsburg State University
  • “Stereoscopic Images and the Teaching of American Realism,” Robert D. Sturr, Kent State University, Stark Campus
  • “Consuming Literature: American Memory, Advertisements, and Realism,” Jeffrey W. Miller

231: E-Teaching: Emerging Foreign Language Methodologies Using Online Course Management Systems

Saturday, 28 December 2002, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., Conference D, Sheraton New York

A special session; session leader: Sylvie L. F. Richards, Brooklyn College, City University of New York

  • “Teaching in the New Millennium: Web-Enhanced Language and Literature Classes,” Char Prieto, Valparaiso University
  • “Using Blackboard Learning Units for Beginning Foreign Language Instruction,” Sylvie L. F. Richards
  • “Online Teaching of French and Spanish with WebCT,” Sylvie Rockmore, Carnegie Mellon University
  • “Online Pedagogy: Managing French Language Courses with Web-Based Technologies,” Barbara A. Szlanic, Columbia University

240: Rhetorics of the New

Saturday, 28 December 2002, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., Concourse B, Hilton New York

Program arranged by the MLA Publications Committee. Presiding: Patricia Bizzell, College of the Holy Cross

  • “Serious Form, Formal Resistance: Shaping Experimental Academic Texts So That Audiences Can See Them,” Anne Frances Wysocki, Michigan Technological University
  • “Novelty into Knowledge: New Academic Media and the Future of English Studies,” Jessica Beth Yood, Lehman College, City University of New York
  • “Making All the Right Moves: Foucault, Journals, and the Authorization of Discourse,” Richard R. McNabb, Long Island University, C. W. Post Campus

244: History of the Book and the Legacy of D. F. McKenzie

Saturday, 28 December 2002, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., Concourse H, Hilton New York

Program arranged by the Society for the History of Authorship, Reading, and Publishing. Presiding: Michael Winship, University of Texas, Austin

  • “Bibliographer of the Mind: D. F. McKenzie and the Radical Middle Ground,” Douglas A. Brooks, Texas A&M University, College Station
  • “Readers, Texts, and the Sociology of Libraries,” Christine J. Pawley, University of Iowa
  • “D. F. McKenzie’s Sociology of Text and Hypertext Editorial Theory,” Chris Koenig-Woodyard, Wilfrid Laurier University

256: Innovative Pedagogies for Teaching Colonial Latin American Literature

Saturday, 28 December 2002, 3:30 to 4:45 p.m., Conference H, Sheraton New York

Program arranged by the Division on Colonial Latin American Literatures. Presiding: Stacey Schlau, West Chester University

  • “Growing into the ‘Smart Classroom,’” Margaret Russell Ewalt, Wake Forest University
  • “‘Muy disformes de los nuestros’: Re-creaciones del discurso colonial latinoamericano en la enseñanza,” Yolanda M. Martínez-San Miguel, Rutgers University, New Brunswick
  • “Memory in the Age of Digital Reproduction: Reflections on an NEH Teaching with Technology Project about Colonial Encounters in the Mississippi Valley,” Luis Fernando Restrepo, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
  • “Sor Juana avant la Lettre: Teaching the Court Poetry of Juana Ramírez,” Kimberly Ann Nance, Illinois State University

277: The Challenges and Conflicts of Contemporary Bibliography

Saturday, 28 December 2002, 3:30 to 4:45 p.m., Liberty 4, Sheraton New York

Program arranged by the Advisory Committee on the MLA International Bibliography. Presiding: David Chioni Moore, Macalester College

  • “Vanishing Sites, Ephemeral Citations, and the Ethics of Attribution (with Special Reference to Caribbean Studies),” Lizabeth Paravisini-Gebert, Vassar College
  • “Improprieties of the Electronic Age: Attribution, Citation, and Plagiarism,” Thomas C. Spear, Lehman College, City University of New York
  • “Practical Bibliographic Research Issues in the Electronic Age,” John M. Jeep, Millikin University

283: Practice, Theory, and Profession: English Studies and New Technologies

Saturday, 28 December 2002, 3:30 to 4:45 p.m., Gibson, Hilton New York

Program arranged by the Association for Computers and the Humanities. Presiding: Michael Hanrahan, Bates College

  • “The Rhetoric of New Media: Teaching a Rhetoric of Hypertext,” Jeff Rice, University of Florida
  • “Technology of Our Own: Computer Literacy and the Small Press,” Jim O’Loughlin, University of Northern Iowa
  • “Old Dogs, New Tricks? New Technologies, the Canon, and the Structure of the Profession,” Deborah Lea Madsen, South Bank University

See http://www.ach.org/mla02 for further details.

285: Standards in the Documentary Editing Community

Saturday, 28 December 2002, 3:30 to 4:45 p.m., Concourse B, Hilton New York

Program arranged by the Association for Documentary Editing. Presiding: Ezra Greenspan, University of South Carolina, Columbia

  • “Standards for Primary Documents on the Web,” Cathy Moran Hajo, New York University
  • “Implementing Standards for Primary Documents,” David R. Chesnutt, University of South Carolina, Columbia
  • “Integrating the Standards for Primary Documents,” Elizabeth H. Dow, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

320: Teaching Multiethnic Literature and Electronic Media: Syllabi and Instructional Aids

Saturday, 28 December 2002, 7:15 to 8:30 p.m., Conference H, Sheraton New York

Program arranged by the Division on Ethnic Studies in Language and Literature. Presiding: James K. Ruppert, University of Alaska, Fairbanks

Speakers: Christopher Lawrence Schedler, University of California, Santa Barbara; Gwendolyn Deloris Pough, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities; Patricia Keefe Durso, Montclair State University; Lori E. Amy, Georgia Southern University

334: Mining Digital Resources: Sites, Tools, Results

Saturday, 28 December 2002, 7:15 to 8:30 p.m., Concourse B, Hilton New York

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Computer Studies in Language and Literature. Presiding: Malcolm Hayward, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

  • “A Widow and Her Soldier: A Stylometric Analysis of the Pickett Letters,” David Holmes, College of New Jersey
  • “‘A Bibliographical Impossibility’: Wright American Fiction, 1851–75,” C. Perry Willett, Indiana University, Bloomington
  • “Mining Deeply Encoded Text: The Versioning Machine,” Susan Schreibman, University of Maryland, College Park
  • “The Perseus Garner: A Test Bed for Digitized Early Modern Resources,” Clifford Edward Wulfman, Tufts University

Respondent: Peter Robinson, De Montfort University


370: Children’s Periodicals

Sunday, 29 December 2002, 8:30 to 9:45 a.m., Concourse G, Hilton New York

Program arranged by the Division on Children’s Literature. Presiding: Kenneth Byron Kidd, University of Florida

  • “Historical or Contemptuous? Images of Asians in St. Nicholas Magazine, 1888–1910,” Claudia Nelson, Southwest Texas State University
  • The Brownies’ Book and Jessie Fauset’s Work for The Crisis,” Jayne E. Marek, Franklin College of Indiana
  • “Tapping into Grrrl Power: Redefining ‘Girls’ on the Web in the Twenty-First Century,” Stephanie Ann Smith, University of Florida

373: Mission civilisatrice et guerres de libération

Sunday, 29 December 2002, 8:30 to 9:45 a.m., Liberty 5, Sheraton New York

Program arranged by the Division on Francophone Literatures and Cultures. Presiding: Clarisse Zimra, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale

  • “Eloge de la créolité: La mission civilisatrice des félibriges créoles,” Samira Sayeh, Penn State University, University Park
  • “Soleil des Indépendences: L’esthétique d’une guerre de libération de l’impérialisme littéraire,” Philip A. Ojo, University of Oregon
  • “The Internet and the Legacy of Colonialism: A Continuing War of Liberation in Congo-Kinshasa,” Paul Anthony Wellen, National Business College

Respondent: Clarisse Zimra


451: How I Teach French Renaissance Literature to Modern American Students

Sunday, 29 December 2002, noon to 1:15 p.m., Versailles Terrace, Sheraton New York

Program arranged by the Division on Sixteenth-Century French Literature. Presiding: Edwin M. Duval, Yale University

  • “Faire renaître la Renaissance: Un ‘adunaton’?” François Rigolot, Princeton University
  • “Rare Books, Web Sites, Great Books, and Other Voices,” Mary B. McKinley, University of Virginia
  • “Sex and Violence? Whatever . . . ,” Ullrich G. Langer, University of Wisconsin, Madison

472: Designing Media Studies as a Liberal Arts Major

Sunday, 29 December 2002, noon to 1:15 p.m., Conference D, Sheraton New York

A special session; session leader: Lisa Gitelman, Catholic University of America

  • “From Film Art to Media Culture and Back Again: Articulating Film Studies at the University of Minnesota,” Haidee S. Wasson, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
  • “Taking Media Liberally at Oberlin College,” Geoffrey B. Pingree, Oberlin College
  • “Babies and Bathwater: The Space of Cinema in New Media Studies,” Paul D. Young, University of Missouri, Columbia
  • “Plugging In: Film Studies, the Small College, and the Flexible Technologies of Discipline,” Jonathan Kahana, Bryn Mawr College

489: Digital Futures: Competing Paradigms for Computing in the Humanities

Sunday, 29 December 2002, noon to 1:15 p.m., Concourse G, Hilton New York

A special session; session leader: Steven E. Jones, Loyola University, Chicago

  • “SGML and XML: Managing Scale, Reading in Detail,” Julia H. Flanders, Brown University
  • “Critical Gaming and the Third Way of Humanities Computing,” Neil Richard Fraistat, University of Maryland, College Park
  • “After the Looking Glass: Humanities Computing and Human-Computer Interaction,” Matthew Gary Kirschenbaum, University of Maryland, College Park
  • “The Art of Extraction: Toward a Cultural History and Aesthetics of XML and Database-Driven Web Sites,” Alan Liu, University of California, Santa Barbara

499: Writing the History of the Book

Sunday, 29 December 2002, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., East, Hilton New York

Program arranged by the Division on Methods of Literary Research. Presiding: Pamela Dalziel, University of British Columbia

  • “What Is a Book? Reconsidering the Category Book in Book History,” Abby Elizabeth Zanger, Harvard University
  • “Technologies of Nostalgia: New Media and Their Genres,” Miranda Jane Burgess, University of British Columbia
  • “Does Theory Have a Place in the History of Books?” Matthew P. Brown, University of Iowa

506: Commercial Lexicography in the Twenty-First Century

Sunday, 29 December 2002, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., Hudson, Hilton New York

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Lexicography. Presiding: Michael P. Adams, Albright College

  • “Commercial Dictionaries in America: Commodities Futures or Manna for the Masses,” Joseph P. Pickett, Houghton Mifflin
  • “The Place of Smaller, Specialized Dictionaries of English in the World of Lexicography,” Anne L. Curzan, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • “From the Inkwell to the Internet: Jobs of and for Lexicographers,” John M. Morse, Merriam-Webster

509: Copyright and the Public Sphere

Sunday, 29 December 2002, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., Sutton South, Hilton New York

A special session; session leader: Colleen Glenney Boggs, Dartmouth College

  • “The Formation of Copyright in Britain and the Public Sphere Today,” Mark A. Rose, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • “Envisioning the Public: The Origins of the Commons and the Fate of the Sphere,” Trevor Thornton Ross, Dalhousie University
  • “Inappropriate Appropriation? Intellectual Property, Internet Fandom, and the Critical Romance of the Electronic Public Sphere,” Josh M. Heuman, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Respondent: Meredith L. McGill, Rutgers University, New Brunswick

518: Performance, Spectacle, and Dramatic Writing in Mexico

Sunday, 29 December 2002, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., Conference L, Sheraton New York

A special session; session leader: Leilani García-Turull, Ursinus College

  • “Caricatures of Politics, Politics of Caricature,” Leilani García-Turull
  • “The Economics of Excess: Nation, Melodrama, and Sexuality in Contemporary Mexican Performance,” Laura G. Gutiérrez, University of Iowa
  • “The (Re)Location of ‘Hope’ and Digital ‘Citizenship’ in Mejor Vida Corp. and Electronic Disturbance Theatre’s Performance Art,” Amy Sara Carroll, Duke University

Respondent: José Esteban Muñoz, New York University

522: Privileging Less Commonly Taught Languages and Authentic Texts: Issues, Challenges, and Solutions for Digital Representation

Sunday, 29 December 2002, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., Concourse G, Hilton New York

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Information Technology. Presiding: Mary Ann Lyman-Hager, San Diego State University

  • “Digitization of Authentic Materials for Less Commonly Taught Languages: Issues and Challenges,” Margo K. Glew, Michigan State University
  • “Supporting the Learning of Less Commonly Taught Languages through System-Wide Collaborative Teaching Approaches: The California State University Virtual Language Laboratory,” Mary Ann Lyman-Hager; Ryu Kitajima, San Diego State University
  • “Making Less Commonly Taught Languages Accessible through New Technologies: Case Studies in East Asian and Middle Eastern Languages,” David Hiple, University of Hawai‘i, Manoa

544: Poetry—Architecture—Poetics

Sunday, 29 December 2002, 3:30 to 4:45 p.m., Concourse G, Hilton New York

Program arranged by the Division on Poetry. Presiding: Stephen McCaffery, York University

  • “‘When the Mind Is like a Hall’: Possible Places of Poetics,” Jed Rasula, University of Georgia
  • “Topological Folding: Baroque Architecture and Its Spatial Morphology in the Cantos of Ezra Pound,” Ming-Qian Ma, State University of New York, Buffalo
  • “All Your Base Belong to Us: Potlatch, Paranoia, and the Ethics of Online Architecture,” Darren Wershler-Henry, York University

647: Literary Studies in Cyberspace: Texts, Contexts, and Criticism

Sunday, 29 December 2002, 9:00 to 10:15 p.m., Concourse G, Hilton New York

A special session; session leader: Patricia Keefe Durso, Montclair State University

  • “Computing: What Does Literary Study Have to Do with IT?” Martha Nell Smith, University of Maryland, College Park
  • “Literature and the Internet: Breaking Textual and Conceptual Boundaries,” Stephanie Patricia Browner, Berea College
  • “Judging Web Sites by Their Covers: Seeking Authority in Cyberspace,” Jack Lynch, Rutgers University, Newark
  • “Using Digital Primary Resources to Produce Scholarship in Print,” John Merritt Unsworth, University of Virginia

Respondent: Alan Liu, University of California, Santa Barbara

See http://blake.montclair.edu/~dursop/mla647.htm for further details.


687: La Virgen de Guadalupe: Icon, Identity, Text

Monday, 30 December 2002, 8:30 to 9:45 a.m., Conference K, Sheraton New York

A special session; session leader: María Carla Sánchez, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

  • “The Iconography of Guadalupe: Its Antecedents and Reverberations across Four Centuries,” George Louis Scheper, Community College of Baltimore County, Essex, MD
  • “Rigid Divinities: María Cristina Mena and the Devotional Ideology of Racial Difference,” María Carla Sánchez
  • “Subversive Maternity: The Dialectics of Generation in Arturo Islas’s The Rain God,” John S. Honerkamp, New York University
  • “Our Lady of Guadalupe as Cyberarte: Religious Iconography and Public Discourse in the Postmodern Classroom,” Lille Norstad, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque

711: Blake Scholarship and the New Technology

Monday, 30 December 2002, 10:15 to 11:30 a.m., Concourse C, Hilton New York

A special session; session leader: Sheila A. Spector, New York, NY

  • “Golgonooza Songs,” Nelson Hilton, University of Georgia
  • “Blake Scholarship and the New Technology: Recovering Blake’s Technology,” Michael Phillips, University of York
  • “The Electronic Media and the Art of William Blake,” Morton D. Paley, University of California, Berkeley

Respondent: Stephen C. Behrendt, University of Nebraska, Lincoln


747: Professional Communication in the Twenty-First Century II: The Future of Technology and the Literacy Industry

Monday, 30 December 2002, noon to 1:15 p.m., Concourse D, Hilton New York

Program arranged by the Association for Business Communication. Presiding: Melinda A. Knight, University of Rochester

  • “Technology-Supported Pedagogy in Business, Technical, and Professional Communication: What’s Being Done Today? What Is the Future?” Angela M. Eaton, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
  • “Demystifying Streaming Video: A Case Study in Webcast Technology,” Arun Sheldon Nevader, University of California, Berkeley
  • “Pedagogy of the Oppressors: Literacy Lessons from Corporate Universities,” Katherine V. Wills, University of Louisville

Respondent: Kitty O’Donnell Locker, Ohio State University, Columbus

754: When Students Write about “the Other”: Research in Actual and Virtual Fields

Monday, 30 December 2002, noon to 1:15 p.m., Concourse C, Hilton New York

Program arranged by the National Council of Teachers of English. Presiding: Bonnie Sunstein, University of Iowa

  • “When Students Write about ‘the Other’: Reflection and Position in Nonfiction,” Bonnie Sunstein
  • “When Students Write about ‘the Other’: Local Goes Global in Online Discourse,” Sarah H. Townsend, University of Iowa

770: Teaching Early Hispanic Literature

Monday, 30 December 2002, noon to 1:15 p.m., Conference L, Sheraton New York

Program arranged by the American Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese. Presiding: Patricia C. Parr, Pasadena, CA

  • “Teaching Old Literature with New Media: The ‘Mujer Brava,’ Lazarillo, and Don Juan,” Mary-Anne Lee Vetterling, Regis College
  • “Garcilaso, Góngora y el tema del carpe diem: Dos perspectivas de un mismo motivo renacentista,” Salvatore J. Poeta, Villanova University
  • “Making It Relevant: Teaching Colonial Literature to Undergraduates and Having Them Care,” John Ochoa, University of California, Riverside

777: Constructing Indigenous Consciousness in Colonizing Languages

Monday, 30 December 2002, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., New York, Hilton New York

Program arranged by the Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures. Presiding: Daniel H. Justice, University of Toronto

  • “Speaking for Ourselves,” Simon J. Ortiz, University of Toronto
  • “Languages of the Indigenous Web,” David A. Golumbia, Long Beach, CA
  • “Evidence of Indigenous Consciousness in a Colonizing Language: Resilience and Resistance in the Poetry of Ofelia Zepeda,” Angelica M. Lawson, University of Arizona
  • “Lost in Translation: Expressing Haida Ideology in English,” Frederick White, Slippery Rock University

793: Teaching beyond the Page

Monday, 30 December 2002, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., Concourse B, Hilton New York

Program arranged by the Association of Teachers of Technical Writing. Presiding: Roxanne Kent-Drury, Northern Kentucky University

  • “From Page to Interface: Teaching Digital Production Skills,” Tharon Howard, Clemson University; Sarah Weathers, Clemson University; Robert Rettew, Clemson University; M. Brad Bonham, Clemson University
  • “Who Needs Communication Skills? A Study of Job Ads across Disciplines,” Angela M. Eaton, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

795: The New Apprenticeship: Navigating Collaboration in Digital Studies

Monday, 30 December 2002, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., Concourse D, Hilton New York

Program arranged by the Association for Computers and the Humanities. Presiding: Susan Schreibman, University of Maryland, College Park

  • “The Blake Archive and More,” Matthew Gary Kirschenbaum, University of Maryland, College Park
  • “Editing the Walt Whitman Archive,” Kenneth M. Price, University of Nebraska, Lincoln
  • “Managing the Walt Whitman Archive,” Alice Rutkowski, University of Virginia
  • “Managing and Editing the Dickinson Electronic Archives,” Lara E. Vetter, Dickinson Electronic Archives

See http://www.ach.org/mla02 for further details.


Other events and activities

The Women Writers Project and the Dickinson Electronic Archives Project will share a booth in the exhibition hall: Booth 1022B, in Americas Hall I and II, Hilton New York. The exhibit halls will be open on 28 and 29 December 2002 from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., and on 30 December 2002 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

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