Conferences Modern Language Association Digital Humanities Sessions

Guide to Humanities-Computing Talks at the 2000 MLA Convention

The Association for Computers and the Humanities has compiled this list of sessions with computing-related talks at the 2000 Modern Language Association Convention (in Washington, DC, from December 27 through 30). Some of these sessions contain only one or two computing-related talks, but this list includes the entire program for each session.

In most cases you must pay the convention-registration fee in order to attend any of these talks. But the following sessions are free and open to the public: “From Gutenberg to Gates: Metamorphoses of Media”, “The Impact of the Internet on East Asian Literatures and Cultures”, “The Humanities at Work: PhDs and New Media”, “The Humanities at Work: University Innovators”, “Still Reading in the New Millennium: A Conversation”, “The Humanities at Work: Postacademic Culture Shock”, and “Writing and Schooling at the Millennium”.

Although the 2000 convention is now in the past, this information will remain available, as a record of what went on. Similar information for many other years is available via the main page on ACH MLA sessions.

Corrections and additions are welcome; please send them to John.Lavagnino@kcl.ac.uk.


Summary of Sessions


53: Rethinking Shakespeare and Performance Criticism

Wednesday, 27 December 2000, 7:00 to 8:15 p.m., Harding Room, Marriott Wardman Park

A special session; session leader: Sarah Werner, George Washington University

  • “Revisiting Shakespeare-in-Performance: A Theater Historian’s View,” Alan C. Dessen, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • “Virtual Performances: Shakespeare Online,” W. B. Worthen, University of California, Berkeley
  • “(Re)Placing and (Re)Writing Shakespearean Stagings,” Barbara Hodgdon, Drake University

70: Getting Published, Electronically and in Print

Wednesday, 27 December 2000, 8:45 to 10:00 p.m., Park Tower Suite 8206, Marriott Wardman Park

Program arranged by the
Council of Editors of Learned Journals. Presiding: Roy C. Flannagan, Milton Quarterly

Speakers: Raymond G. Siemens, Early Modern Literary Studies; Heidi McGregor, JSTOR; Joan Grenier-Winther, Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association


121: Online Discourse: Theoretical Perspectives

Thursday, 28 December 2000, 8:30 to 9:45 a.m., Virginia Suite A, Marriott Wardman Park

Program arranged by the Popular Culture Association. Presiding: Beth A. Ferri, Texas Woman’s University

  • “Objects, Subjects, and Discourse in Cyberspace,” Bish Sen, Rochester, New York
  • “Cyborg Feminist Networks and Productions,” Rebecca J. Holden, Howard Community College, Maryland
  • “Creating Communities out of Fear: The Culture of Y2K,” Patricia Ventura, University of Florida
  • “Cybversive Spaces: Negotiating Hidden Identities Electronically,” Beth A. Ferri

122: From Gutenberg to Gates: Metamorphoses of Media

Thursday, 28 December 2000, 10:15 a.m. to noon, Salon 1, Marriott Wardman Park

A forum. Presiding: Margaret W. Ferguson, University of California, Davis

  • “Narrative and Its Media,” Robert Scholes, Brown University
  • “Coding the Signifier: Rethinking Semiosis in Digital Media,” N. Katherine Hayles, University of California, Los Angeles
  • “Electracy: A Grammatology of Memory,” Gregory L. Ulmer, University of Florida
  • “Digital Humanism and the Coming Age of Print,” Stuart Moulthrop, University of Baltimore

For coordinated workshops, see meetings 321 and 484.

127: The Impact of the Internet on East Asian Literatures and Cultures

Thursday, 28 December 2000, 10:15 to 11:30 a.m., Hamilton Room, Washington Hilton

Program arranged by the Division on East Asian Literatures. Presiding: Toru Kiuchi, Nihon University, Japan

  • “The Geography of Cyberliterature in Korea,” Aeju Kim, Dongguk University, South Korea
  • “The Internet and Modern Japanese Literature,” Toru Kiuchi
  • “Emergent Cultural Formations and Contradictions: Some Comments on the Internet in China,” Kang Liu, Penn State University, University Park

133: Distance Education for Learning and Teaching Foreign Languages I

Thursday, 28 December 2000, 10:15 to 11:30 a.m., Caucus Room, Washington Hilton

Program arranged by the Division on the Teaching of Language. Presiding: Helene Zimmer-Loew, American Association of Teachers of German

  • “Teaching and Learning Styles in the Online Environment: What We Can Learn from Distance Learning,” Laura G. McGee, Western Kentucky University
  • “Distance Education, Proficiency, and Foreign Language for Professional Use,” K. Eckhard Kuhn-Osius, Hunter College, City University of New York

135: Representing the Seventeenth Century in Anthologies, Syllabi, and Curricula

Thursday, 28 December 2000, 10:15 to 11:30 a.m., Virginia Suite A, Marriott Wardman Park

Program arranged by the Division on Seventeenth-Century English Literature. Presiding: Constance A. Jordan, Claremont Graduate University

  • “The Canonical Texture of the Seventeenth Century: Teaching Political, Religious, and Literary Debates,” Gina Hausknecht, Coe College
  • “Representing Gender in the Seventeenth Century,” Betty S. Travitsky, Graduate Center, City University of New York
  • “Representing the Seventeenth Century Online,” Susanne Woods, Wheaton College, Massachusetts

136: Functions of Victorian Culture at the Present Time I: A Roundtable

Thursday, 28 December 2000, 10:15 to 11:30 a.m., Virginia Suite C, Marriott Wardman Park

Program arranged by the Division on the Victorian Period. Presiding: Christine L. Krueger, Marquette University

  • “Victorian Painting at the National Gallery,” Nicolai Cikovsky, Jr., National Gallery of Art
  • “Exhibiting Victorian Women,” Barbara T. Gates, University of Delaware, Newark; Maria H. Frawley, University of Delaware, Newark
  • “Scholarship on the Web,” George P. Landow, National University of Singapore
  • “Disseminating Victorian Culture in the Postmillennial Classroom,” Sue Lonoff, Harvard University

140: Words on the Web

Thursday, 28 December 2000, 10:15 to 11:30 a.m., Maryland Suite B, Marriott Wardman Park

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Lexicography. Presiding: Joseph P. Pickett, Houghton Mifflin Co.

  • “Self-Publication, Shameless Self-Promotion, and Stop Words: The World Wide Web as Full-Text Database,” Suzanne Caldwell, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • “The Allure of Lost Words,” Richard W. Bailey, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • “Locating Localisms on the World Wide Web,” Allan A. Metcalf, MacMurray College

142: Academic Labor and Radical Pedagogy: The Fateful Nexus

Thursday, 28 December 2000, 10:15 to 11:30 a.m., Wilson Room A, Marriott Wardman Park

A special session; session leader: Ronald L. Strickland, Illinois State University

  • “Resistance through Hypertext: ACTing UP in the Electronic Classroom,” Laura L. Sullivan, University of Florida
  • “Where Do Teaching and Organizing Meet?” Randy Martin, Pratt Institute
  • “Organize This! Faculty Union Insurgency at the Largest, Poorest Public University,” Harold Aram Veeser, City College, City University of New York

160: Whose Standards? II

Thursday, 28 December 2000, 10:15 to 11:30 a.m., Eisenhower Room, Marriott Wardman Park

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Scholarly Editions. Presiding: Katherine O’Brien O’Keeffe, University of Notre Dame

  • “Electronic Editions of Damaged Manuscripts,” Kevin S. Kiernan, University of Kentucky
  • “Editorial Practice: Finding an Audience for the TEAMS Middle English Text Series,” Thomas George Hahn, University of Rochester
  • “Who’s the Reader? Who’s the Writer? Electronic Versions of Early Women’s Texts,” Elizabeth H. Hageman, University of New Hampshire, Durham

164: MOOs: The Theory and Culture of Virtual Worlds I

Thursday, 28 December 2000, 10:15 to 11:30 a.m., Coolidge Room, Marriott Wardman Park

Program arranged by the Association for Computers and the Humanities. Presiding: Neil Fraistat, University of Maryland, College Park

  • “The MOO as a New Media Genre”, Jay David Bolter, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • “Evolving Notions of Authorship in Online Worlds”, Amy Bruckman, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • “The Spatialization of Text and the Textualization of Space: Editing in the MOO”, Steven E. Jones, Loyola University, Chicago

One talk originally scheduled as part of this session has been cancelled: “How to do things with MOO: A Hermeneutic Perspective on Virtual Worlds”, by Espen Aarseth of the University of Bergen.

Further information is available on the World Wide Web.


174A: The Humanities at Work: PhDs and New Media

Thursday, 28 December 2000, noon to 1:45 p.m., Virginia Suite A, Marriott Wardman Park

A forum. Presiding: Maggie Debelius, Princeton University

  • “Bridging the Gap: From the Academy to an Internet Start-Up,” Jorge Pedraza, Concrete Media
  • “Reinventing the Academy,” Ann Kirschner, Fathom
  • “Why I Like to Hire PhDs,” Tom Gardner, Motley Fool

For coordinated workshops, see meetings 266 and 413.

204: Computers and the Production of Literature

Thursday, 28 December 2000, noon to 1:15 p.m., Virginia Suite C, Marriott Wardman Park

A special session; session leader: Wayne V. Miller, University of California, Los Angeles

  • “Literature at the Human-Computer Seam,” Michael D. Levi, United States Bureau of Labor Statistics
  • “Why Is There a Window on My Desktop? Computers, Focus, and Gaze,” Wayne V. Miller
  • “Reading, Browsing, and the Usurpation of Hypertext,” Robert S. Bledsoe, Rice University

Respondent: Stuart M. Kurland, Duquesne University

216: Open Forum on Distance Learning

Thursday, 28 December 2000, noon to 1:15 p.m., Eisenhower Room, Marriott Wardman Park

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Computers and Emerging Technologies in Teaching and Research. Presiding: Douglas Morgenstern, Massachusetts Institute of Technology


244: Changing Standards: Spanish in the New Millennium

Thursday, 28 December 2000, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., Room C-326, Washington Hilton

Program arranged by the Division on Language Change. Presiding: Florencia Cortés-Conde, Universidad de San Andrés

  • “Spanish in Miami: Forty Years after the Arrival of the First Wave of Cuban Exiles,” Ana Roca, Florida International University
  • “Spanish in the Internet: Is There Any Change?” Florencia Cortés-Conde

256: Brain Work: Representations of Postindustrial Labor in American Literature

Thursday, 28 December 2000, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., Wilson Room B, Marriott Wardman Park

A special session; session leader: Andrew Hoberek, University of Missouri, Columbia

  • “The Gendering of Postindustrial Labor from Riesman to Coupland,” Heather J. Hicks, Villanova University
  • “Creativity in the Age of Knowledge Management,” Christopher John Newfield, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • “Cyberculture, Business Culture, and the Literary Counterculture, 1950-70,” Maria Magdalena Farland, Columbia University

Respondent: Lawrence Rothfield, University of Chicago

266: The Humanities at Work: University Innovators

Thursday, 28 December 2000, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., Virginia Suite A, Marriott Wardman Park

A workshop arranged in conjunction with the forum The Humanities at Work: PhDs and New Media (174A). Presiding: Susan Basalla, Motley Fool

  • “The Demonstrated Value of Graduate Student Internships,” Jeffrey N. Cox, University of Colorado, Boulder
  • “The Trouble with Graduate Student Internships,” Deborah S. Carlin, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Respondent: Cary Nelson, University of Illinois, Urbana

270: The Fate of the Scholarly Monograph

Thursday, 28 December 2000, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., Virginia Suite C, Marriott Wardman Park

Program arranged by the Advisory Committee on the MLA International Bibliography. Presiding: Susanna Bartmann Pathak, Virginia Commonwealth University; Catharine E. Wall, University of California, Riverside

  • “Netlibrary.com: Helping or Hindering the Demise of the Scholarly Monograph,” Anthony W. Ferguson, Columbia University
  • “Great Themes and Small Distinctions,” Willis G. Regier, University of Illinois Press
  • “Promise,” Helen Tartar, Stanford University Press
  • “Thematic Research Collections: An Emerging Genre of Scholarly Publication,” John Merritt Unsworth, University of Virginia

308: Computer Studies in Language and Literature: What Counts and Why

Thursday, 28 December 2000, 3:30 to 4:45 p.m., Eisenhower Room, Marriott Wardman Park

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Computer Studies in Language and Literature. Presiding: David L. Hoover, New York University

  • “Computational Stylistics and Nontraditional Authorship Attribution Studies,” Joseph Rudman, Carnegie Mellon University
  • “The Evolution of Characterization and Some Aspects of Style in Twentieth-Century American Science Fiction Magazine Short Stories,” Eric S. Rabkin, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • “Reinventing the Archive: The Modernist Journals Project and the Digital New Age,” Sean Latham, Brown University

321: Still Reading in the New Millennium: A Conversation

Thursday, 28 December 2000, 3:30 to 4:45 p.m., Salon 3, Marriott Wardman Park

A workshop arranged in conjunction with the forum From Gutenberg to Gates: Metamorphoses of Media (122). Presiding: Charles Francis Altieri, University of California, Berkeley

Speakers: Geoffrey H. Hartman, Yale University; Kathleen A. McCormick, State University of New York, Purchase; Michael Levenson, University of Virginia; Carlos J. Alonso, University of Pennsylvania

323: Context, Culture, and Identity in Language Learning and Teaching: A Session in Honor of Claire Kramsch

Thursday, 28 December 2000, 3:30 to 4:45 p.m., Military Room, Washington Hilton

Program arranged by the Association of Departments of Foreign Languages. Presiding: Arthur D. Mosher, University of Dayton

  • “From the Blackboard to the World Wide Web and Back: Methodologial Connections, Transformations, and Reflections,” Gilberte Furstenberg, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • “The Return of the Text,” Peter C. Patrikis, Consortium for Language Teaching and Learning
  • “Claire Kramsch and Germanistik Today,” Frank Trommler, University of Pennsylvania

Respondent: Claire J. Kramsch, University of California, Berkeley


380: Under the Skin: Medical Imaging and the Virtual Body

Thursday, 28 December 2000, 7:15 to 8:30 p.m., Virginia Suite C, Marriott Wardman Park

Program arranged by the Division on Literature and Science. Presiding: Jim Swan, State University of New York, Buffalo

  • “What Is Normal? Portraits from the Inside Out,” Bettyann Holtzmann Kevles, National Air and Space Museum
  • “Performing Live Surgery on TV and the Internet since 1945,” David H. Serlin, National Library of Medicine
  • “Speed Surgeries: Advanced Networking and Computer-Generated Modeling in Telesurgical Applications,” Eugene Y. Thacker, Rutgers University, New Brunswick

395: Media Theory and Literature

Thursday, 28 December 2000, 7:15 to 8:30 p.m., Wilson Room A, Marriott Wardman Park

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Media and Literature. Presiding: Moneera Al-Ghadeer, Eastern Michigan University

  • “Empire and the Materiality of Media Technologies,” Charles A. Baldwin, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • “How Cyberspace Deforms Our Literary Critical Concepts,” Kathleen L. Komar, University of California, Los Angeles
  • “The Canon of Advertisements,”Deirdre Flynn, University of California, Berkeley
  • “The Fly as Noise,” Bruce Clarke, Texas Tech University

413: The Humanities at Work: Postacademic Culture Shock

Thursday, 28 December 2000, 7:15 to 8:30 p.m., Virginia Suite A, Marriott Wardman Park

A workshop arranged in conjunction with the forum The Humanities at Work: PhDs and New Media (174A). Presiding: Sabrina M. Wenrick, FDC Reports

  • “Finding Your Eclectic Mix,” Maggie Debelius, Princeton University; Susan Basalla, Motley Fool
  • “Landing Your First Job outside Academia,” Sabrina M. Wenrick

416: Documentary Editing in the Digital Age: New Ways of Thinking about Old Problems

Thursday, 28 December 2000, 7:15 to 8:30 p.m., Park Tower Suite 8211, Marriott Wardman Park

Program arranged by the Association for Documentary Editing. Presiding: Peter L. Shillingsburg, University of North Texas

  • “The Electronic Margaret Fuller: A Case Study of Editing in the Digital Age,” Judith Mattson Bean, Texas Woman’s University; Joel Myerson, University of South Carolina, Columbia
  • “We Can Publish It, but Can You Find It?” Elizabeth H. Dow, University of Vermont
  • “Content or Context? Dollars versus Sense in Documentary Editions,” David R. Chesnutt, University of South Carolina, Columbia

436: Distance Education for Learning and Teaching Foreign Languages II

Friday, 29 December 2000, 8:30 to 9:45 a.m., Cabinet Room, Washington Hilton

Program arranged by the Division on the Teaching of Language. Presiding: Thomas J. Garza, University of Texas, Austin

  • “The Use of the Internet for the Teaching of Advanced Spanish: A Critical Discussion of Current Technologies and New Challenges,” Santiago Juan-Navarro, Florida International University
  • “Foreign Language Teaching Online: How to Get the Most from the Web’s Interaction and Multimedia Capabilities,” Esperanza Roman Mendoza, George Mason University

451: Subjectivity Dot-Com

Friday, 29 December 2000, 8:30 to 9:45 a.m., Park Tower Suite 8212, Marriott Wardman Park

A special session; session leader: Shera Ahmad, Capital Thinking

  • ” `The Colossal Market-Space of Culture,’ ” Thomas Foster, Indiana University, Bloomington
  • ” `You’ve Got Mail’: Theorizing E-Subjectivity and the Aesthetic,” Manav S. Ratti, University of Oxford
  • “Home Pages: Immigrant Subjectivity and the World Wide Web,” Sangita Gopal, Old Dominion University

Respondent: Shera Ahmad

457: Digital Media and Graduate Students in the Modern Languages

Friday, 29 December 2000, 8:30 to 9:45 a.m., Coolidge Room, Marriott Wardman Park

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Computers and Emerging Technologies in Teaching and Research. Presiding: Matthew G. Kirschenbaum, University of Kentucky

  • “Is Web Work Marketable in the Academy?” Ron Broglio, University of Alabama, Birmingham
  • “Saving Yourself for Tenure: Intellectual Property and the Job Candidate’s Dilemma,” Stephanie L. Tripp, University of Florida
  • “Message in an E-Mail: `Is There Anybody Hiring Out There?’; or, The Place for Cyberspace Literacy in the Academic Market,” Kimberly A. Wells, Texas A&M University, College Station

467: World Wide Poetry on the Web

Friday, 29 December 2000, 10:15 to 11:30 a.m., Maryland Suite B, Marriott Wardman Park

Program arranged by the Division on Poetry. Presiding: Loss Pequeño Glazier, State University of New York, Buffalo

  • ” `No One to Drive the Car’: Experimental Poetry across Time and Space,” Alan Filreis, University of Pennsylvania
  • “Using the William Blake Archive in Teaching Poetry,” Josephine Ann McQuail, Tennessee Technological University
  • “Listening to the Edit: The Digital Potential and Pitfalls in Webcast Poetry Programs,” Martin Spinelli, Brooklyn College, City University of New York

Respondent: Loss Pequeño Glazier

472: Symptoms of Theory: Nation, Enjoyment, Critique

Friday, 29 December 2000, 10:15 to 11:30 a.m., Georgetown East Room, Washington Hilton

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Romanian Studies. Presiding: Christian Moraru, University of North Carolina, Greensboro

  • “Lacan or Lenin: The Styles of Slavoj Zizek,” Tomislav Z. Longinovic, University of Wisconsin, Madison
  • “Zizek after Marx: Enjoyment as the Historical Factor,” Todd McGowan, Southwest Texas State University
  • ” `Not That There’s Anything Wrong with That’; or, Enjoying the Virtual Subject,” Jonna Mackin, University of Pennsylvania
  • “Fantasy.com: Textualizing Otherness in the Digital Age,” Thomas Lavazzi, Savannah State University

484: Writing and Schooling at the Millennium

Friday, 29 December 2000, 10:15 to 11:30 a.m., Salon 1, Marriott Wardman Park

A workshop arranged in conjunction with the forum From Gutenberg to Gates: Metamorphoses of Media (122). Presiding: David J. Bartholomae, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh

  • “Composition, Rhetoric, and English in the Twenty-First Century: Looking Forward by Looking Back,” John Brereton, University of Massachusetts, Boston
  • “Style for the Twenty-First Century,” Andrea A. W. Lunsford, Stanford University
  • “Literacy, Lies, and Videotape: A New Curriculum for Teachers of Writing,” James E. Seitz, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh
  • “New Genres of Student Writing and New Century Schools,” Jabari Mahiri, University of California, Berkeley
  • “Writing the Underside of the Curriculum,” Jonathan Beck Monroe, Cornell University
  • “Composition and the New Humanities,” Kurt Spellmeyer, Rutgers University, New Brunswick

491: Literature through Multimedia: Ideas That Work

Friday, 29 December 2000, 10:15 to 11:30 a.m., Cabinet Room, Washington Hilton

Program arranged by the MLA Advisory Committee on Foreign Languages and Literatures. Presiding: Carol Marie Lazzaro-Weis, Southern University

  • “VROMA: A Virtual Community for Teaching and Learning the Classics,” Judith de Luce, Miami University, Athens
  • “Project Sherezade: Teaching Spanish Literature Interactively,” Enrique J. Fernandez, University of Manitoba
  • “Using Multimedia to Enhance Standards-Based Literary Instruction,” Yoshiko Saito-Abbott, California State University, Monterey

492: Economies of Writing I

Friday, 29 December 2000, 10:15 to 11:30 a.m., Virginia Suite A, Marriott Wardman Park

Program arranged by the Society for Critical Exchange. Presiding: Martha A. Woodmansee, Case Western Reserve University

  • “Judging a Book by Its … Price, Distribution, and Lesbian Representation in 1928,” Deborah A. Cohler, Brown University
  • “Private Circulation: Secrecy, Scarcity, and the Endurance of Victorian Homoerotica,” Elaine C. Freedgood, University of Pennsylvania
  • “New Economics and New Collaborations in the Digital Age: The Example of the Walt Whitman Archive,” Kenneth M. Price, University of Nebraska, Lincoln

Paper summaries will be available before the meeting at http://www.cwru.edu/affil/sce.

496: Visual Communication in Cyberspace

Friday, 29 December 2000, 10:15 to 11:30 a.m., Park Tower Suite 8212, Marriott Wardman Park

Program arranged by the Association of Teachers of Technical Writing. Presiding: Sam Dragga, Texas Tech University

  • “Thinking in Three Dimensions: The Case for Teaching Hypermedia in the Technical Communications Service Course,” Roxanne Kent-Drury, Northern Kentucky University
  • “New Medium, New Message: Visual Rhetoric in Online versus Print Journals,” Nicole Ervin Amare, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa
  • “Web-Based Communication in the Technical Writing Classroom,” Kathryn Summers, University of North Carolina, Greensboro
  • “Screen Time: On Teaching the Design + Reading of Transition and Animation on the Web,” Anne Frances Wysocki, Michigan Technological University

512: The Brown Women Writers Project Online: “New” Texts, New Questions

Friday, 29 December 2000, noon to 1:15 p.m., Park Tower Suite 8212, Marriott Wardman Park

Program arranged by the Division on Methods of Literary Research. Presiding: Elizabeth H. Hageman, University of New Hampshire, Durham

  • “Searching for Women’s Work: Literacy and Cultural Analysis of Online Texts,” Lori Humphrey Newcomb, University of Illinois, Urbana
  • “Medieval Women’s Manuscripts: Authorship and Encoding Challenges,” Laurie Anne Finke, Kenyon College
  • “The Role of the WWP in the Development of Literary Encoding in the 1990s,” Allen Renear, Brown University
  • “Mary Carleton’s Conditional Modes: A Discourse Analysis of a WWO Text,” Kimberly S. Hill, Kent State University, Kent

See also Other events and activities for a related exhibit.

513: Effects of Technology on Student and Faculty Learning

Friday, 29 December 2000, noon to 1:15 p.m., Coolidge Room, Marriott Wardman Park

Program arranged by the Division on Teaching as a Profession. Presiding: Darren Cambridge, University of Texas, Austin

  • “Uncovering Complexity in a Culture of Reflective Practice,” Randy Bass, Georgetown University
  • “The Symbol of Tragedy: A Web-Based Resource for Teaching Ethical Criticism,” Deborah Williams Minter, University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Jeffrey S. Poland, University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Malea D. Powell, University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Justine Reilly, University of Nebraska, Lincoln
  • “The Heart of the Matter: Documenting Teaching and Learning in Technology-Enhanced Environments,” Margaret Syverson, University of Texas, Austin

517: Comparative United States Literatures I: Turn-of-the-Century Sexualities

Friday, 29 December 2000, noon to 1:15 p.m., Harding Room, Marriott Wardman Park

Program arranged by the Division on Late-Nineteenth- and Early-Twentieth-Century American Literature. Presiding: Betsy Jacqueline Erkkila, Northwestern University

  • “The Clubfoot and the Peg Leg: The Male Body in the Postbellum American South,” Judith Jackson Fossett, University of Southern California
  • “Wired Love: Sex, Media, and American Modernity,” Mark Anton Goble, Stanford University
  • “American Nationhood as Eugenic Romance: D. W. Griffith’s Broken Blossoms,” Susan Koshy, University of California, Santa Barbara

518: Germanic Philology

Friday, 29 December 2000, noon to 1:15 p.m., Room C-326, Washington Hilton

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Germanic Philology. Presiding: John M. Jeep, Miami University, Oxford

  • “A Reappraisal of the Syllable Contact Law,” Marc Pierce, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • “The Healing Power of Heresy in Hartmann von Aue’s `Armer Heinrich,'” Patricia McGurk, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
  • ” `Is That Your Final Answer?’: Reconstructing Caedmon’s Hymn in a Postmodern Age,” Dan O’Donnell, University of Lethbridge
  • “Analyzing Conversational Self-Repair Strategies of English-German Bilinguals: Hesitations, Gaps, and Fillers,” Caroline L. Rieger, University of Alberta

528: The Book as Object and Metaphor in the Digital Age

Friday, 29 December 2000, noon to 1:15 p.m., Delaware Suite B, Marriott Wardman Park

A special session; session leader: Charles Bernstein, State University of New York, Buffalo

  • “Materiality and Metadata: Toward a Metalogics of the Book,” Johanna Drucker, University of Virginia
  • “Workers of the Book, Unite!” Jerome J. McGann, University of Virginia
  • “Editing A Book of the Book: A Return to the Book and Writing,” Jerome Rothenberg, University of California, San Diego

531: What’s New about the New?

Friday, 29 December 2000, noon to 1:15 p.m., Wilson Room B, Marriott Wardman Park

A special session; session leader: Elena Pearl Glasberg, California State University, Los Angeles

  • “The Seduction of Becoming (Other),” Eva Cherniavsky, Indiana University, Bloomington
  • “Mattering on the Net: Virtual Spaces as Prefigurative Forms,” Thomas Foster, Indiana University, Bloomington
  • “What’s Blood Got to Do with It? On Genes and Society,” Robyn Wiegman, University of California, Irvine

536: Pedagogical Uses of New Media in the Foreign Language Classroom

Friday, 29 December 2000, noon to 1:15 p.m.,Room C-328, Washington Hilton

A special session; session leader: Sylvie L. F. Richards, Columbia University

  • “Electronic Bulletin Boards à la Française: Using a `Journal Electronique’ in Elementary French Instruction,” Barbara A. Szlanic, Columbia University
  • “Effective Utilization of Electronic Bulletin Boards in Upper-Division Spanish Courses,” Andrew Steven Gordon, Mesa State College
  • “Creating Dynamic Assignments with New Media: Examples from Advanced Spanish Classes,” Pilar Munday, Sacred Heart University

Respondent: Sylvie L. F. Richards

537: Mobile Citizens, Media States

Friday, 29 December 2000, noon to 1:15 p.m., Marriott Balcony C and D, Marriott Wardman Park

Program arranged by the PMLA Editorial Board. Presiding: Emily Apter, University of California, Los Angeles; Anton Kaes, University of California, Berkeley; David Norman Rodowick, University of London

  • “Monitor and Witness: Media and Human Rights,” Thomas W. Keenan, Bard College
  • “Digital Networks and Citizenship,” Mark Poster, University of California, Irvine
  • “Very Busy Just Now: Globalization and Harriedness,” Bruce W. Robbins, Rutgers University, New Brunswick

Respondent: N. Katherine Hayles, University of California, Los Angeles

539: Teaching Boccaccio’s Decameron

Friday, 29 December 2000, noon to 1:15 p.m., Cabinet Room, Washington Hilton

Program arranged by the MLA Publications Committee. Presiding: James H. McGregor, University of Georgia

  • “Women in the Decameron,” F. Regina Psaki, University of Oregon
  • “Anatomizing Boccaccio’s Sexual Festivity,” Raymond Jean Frontain, University of Central Arkansas
  • “The Decameron Web: Teaching a Classic as Hypertext at Brown University,” Emil Michael Papio, College of the Holy Cross

Respondents: Robert W. Hanning, Columbia University; Bonnie D. Irwin, Northern Indiana University; Robert Bayliss, Indiana University, Bloomington

541: Electronic Rhetoric: Persuasion, Narrative, and the Web

Friday, 29 December 2000, noon to 1:15 p.m., Park Tower Suite 8209, Marriott Wardman Park

Program arranged by the Association for Business Communication. Presiding: Melinda A. Knight, University of Rochester

  • “Rhetoric’s Role: Preparing Students to Deliver Persuasive Texts in Any Forum,” James Michael Dubinsky, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
  • “Using Techniques of Literary Analysis in a Professional Writing Course Web Site Project,” Nancy P. Van Arsdale, East Stroudsburg University
  • “Reaching Out to `Citizens’: Microsoft’s Cyberspace Rhetoric,” Bonnie Lee Woodbery, Florida State University

555: Leveling the Field: Literature and Science and Science Studies

Friday, 29 December 2000, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., Virginia Suite A, Marriott Wardman Park

Program arranged by the Division on Literature and Science. Presiding: Arielle Saiber, Bowdoin College

  • “Understanding Science Wired: Future Sci-Lit Studies and New Media,” Timothy Lenoir, Stanford University
  • “The Pleasures and Perils of the Scientific Text,” George L. Levine, Rutgers University, New Brunswick
  • “Heuristic Allies,” Wai Chee Dimock, Yale University
  • “Where’s the Beef?” Harriet Ritvo, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

558: Medieval Iberia Online

Friday, 29 December 2000, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., Cabinet Room, Washington Hilton

Program arranged by the Division on Spanish Medieval Language and Literature. Presiding: Barbara F. Weissberger, Old Dominion University

  • “Web Site: Cantar de Mio Cid,” Matthew J. Bailey, University of Texas, Austin
  • “Philobiblon Online: Present and Future,” Harvey L. Sharrer, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • “Teaching Medieval French and Spanish Lyric: An NEH Initiative,” George D. Greenia, College of William and Mary

563: History and Future of Rhetorics outside the Paradigm

Friday, 29 December 2000, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., Maryland Suite B, Marriott Wardman Park

Program arranged by the Division on the History and Theory of Rhetoric and Composition. Presiding: Catherine Lynn Hobbs, University of Oklahoma

  • “From Plato to Disney: Magic, Rhetoric, and the Regulation of Memory,” William A. Covino, Florida Atlantic University
  • “Chinese Rhetoric: Understanding Octopartite Parables,” C. Jan Swearingen, Texas A&M University, College Station
  • “Game Theory and the Future of Rhetoric,” Alan W. France, West Chester University
  • “Rhetoric as a Feminist Project,” Cheryl Glenn, Penn State University, University Park
  • “The Rhetoric of Visual Cultural Analysis,” Marguerite Helen Helmers, University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh
  • “Electronic Rhetorics: Paradigms of the Future,” Alison Elizabeth Regan, University of Utah

580: Educating Modern Language Graduate Students in Information Technology

Friday, 29 December 2000, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., Park Tower Suite 8210, Marriott Wardman Park

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Computers and Emerging Technologies in Teaching and Research. Presiding: F. Tyler Curtain, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

  • “How to Survive as a Technology Specialist in a Modern Language Department,” Kathleen Duguay, East Stroudsburg University
  • “Possession in a Digital Age: Intellectual Property Issues Graduate Students Should Think about When Planning Their Projects,” Elizabeth Townsend, University of Arizona

Respondents: F. Tyler Curtain; James S. Noblitt, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Sarah Jane Sloane, Colorado State University; Matthew Berk, Inc.com

581: What the Government Funds in Foreign Languages

Friday, 29 December 2000, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., Map Room, Washington Hilton

Program arranged by the MLA Office of Foreign Language Programs. Presiding: James Efstathios Alatis, Georgetown University

  • “International and Language Programs,” Ralph Hines, Center for International Education
  • “Languages for Business and Science,” Robert Slater, National Security Education Program
  • “Language, Literature, and Technology,” Bruce Robinson, National Endowment for the Humanities

606: Bibliography and the Internet

Friday, 29 December 2000, 3:30 to 4:45 p.m., Coolidge Room, Marriott Wardman Park

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Bibliography and Textual Studies. Presiding: Betty T. Bennett, American University

  • ” `Where Do You Want to Go Today?’: Electronic Reading and the Idea of Text,” Robin G. Schulze, Penn State University, University Park
  • “Outside the Archive,” Matthew G. Kirschenbaum, University of Kentucky; Kari Kraus, University of Rochester
  • “Making Digital Texts Smart,” Susan Schreibman, New Jersey Institute of Technology

625: Teaching American English I

Friday, 29 December 2000, 3:30 to 4:45 p.m., Park Tower Suite 8212, Marriott Wardman Park

Program arranged by the American Dialect Society. Presiding: Michael P. Adams, Albright College

  • “Goals and Teaching English Language Classes,” Sonja Lanehart, University of Georgia
  • “The Politics of Teaching Standard English,” Anne L. Curzan, University of Washington
  • “Teaching American English on the Web,” William A. Kretzschmar, University of Georgia

632: American Literary Studies at a New Millennium: Publishing, Teaching, Working the Field

Friday, 29 December 2000, 3:30 to 4:45 p.m., Marriott Balcony C and D, Marriott Wardman Park

Program arranged by the American Literature Section. Presiding: Robert S. Levine, University of Maryland, College Park

  • American Literature: A Report from the Editor,” Houston A. Baker, Duke University
  • “Got Lit? Publishing Choices in American Literary Studies,” Sian Hunter, University of North Carolina Press
  • “Majority Report: Counting Work at an Undergraduate College,” Stephanie Patricia Browner, Berea College
  • Powerpoint or Perish? Pedagogy and the Technological Imperative,” Gregory S. Jay, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
  • “Working (in) African American Literature,” Frances Smith Foster, Emory University
  • “Queer (Asian American) Canons,” David L. Eng, Columbia University
  • “American Studies without Exceptions,” Michael F. Bérubé, University of Illinois, Urbana

666: Research Methods Developed from Electronic Resources

Friday, 29 December 2000, 7:15 to 8:30 p.m., Park Tower Suite 8212, Marriott Wardman Park

Program arranged by the Division on Methods of Literary Research. Presiding: Susanne Woods, Wheaton College, MA

  • “Creating Electronic Texts as a Research Methods Course,” William A. Wortman, Miami University, Oxford
  • “Unplugging the Book: Information Management, Electronic Resources, and Bibliographic Research,” Suzanne Disheroon Green, Northwestern State University
  • “The Genre Evolution Project,” Eric S. Rabkin, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

668: Issues in Discourse Analysis

Friday, 29 December 2000, 7:15 to 8:30 p.m., Room C-328, Washington Hilton

Program arranged by the Division on Language and Society. Presiding: José Del Valle, Fordham University, Bronx

  • “Metalinguistic Discourse and Nostalgia among Three Generations of Romanian Americans,” Domnita Dumitrescu, California State University, Los Angeles
  • “When Distance and Solidarity Collide: New Politeness Strategies in Japanese,” Kyoko Takashi Wilkerson, Nagoya University of Foreign Studies
  • ” `Installing the Future’: Objectifying the Future in Factual Discourse,” Patricia L. Dunmire, Kent State University, Kent
  • “Corpus Linguistics and Narrative Analysis,” David John Herman, North Carolina State University

734: Beyond Hypertext: Exploring Online Communication and Community

Saturday, 30 December 2000, 10:15 to 11:30 a.m., Park Tower Suite 8210, Marriott Wardman Park

A special session; session leader: Michael Eberle-Sinatra, University of Toronto

  • “Writing, Reading, and Viewing the Self: The Contractual Nature of Domestic Web Cams,” Andreas Gernot Kitzman, University of Karlstad, Sweden
  • “What’s Cooking: Personal Narrative in the Online Kitchen,”Laura S. Patterson, Vanderbilt University
  • “Where the Texts Are,” Thomas C. Crochunis, Brown University

799: Economies of Writing II

Saturday, 30 December 2000, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., Virginia Suite B, Marriott Wardman Park

Program arranged by the Society for Critical Exchange. Presiding: Richard M. Ohmann, Wesleyan University

  • “Im-pressing the Realm: The Imprint of Royal Authority in Henrican England,” Douglas A. Brooks, Texas A&M University, College Station
  • “Blackstone and Electronic Text,” Michael Hancher, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
  • “Technical Writing as Lingua Franca in a Scientific Economy,” Bernadette Celia Longo, Clemson University

Respondent: James E. Porter, Case Western Reserve University

Paper summaries will be available before the meeting at http://www.cwru.edu/affil/sce.

805: MOOs: The Theory and Culture of Virtual Worlds II

Saturday, 30 December 2000, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., Coolidge Room, Marriott Wardman Park

Program arranged by the Association for Computers and the Humanities. Presiding: Neil Fraistat, University of Maryland, College Park

  • “Word and Image on the Infinite Frontier: Textual Politics and MUspace”, Stuart Moulthrop, University of Baltimore
  • “Virtuality, Reality, Simulacra, and Simulations”, Carl Stahmer, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • “Presences and Habitations, Verbal, Visual and Virtual Aftermaths”, Michael Joyce, Vassar College

Further information is available on the World Wide Web.

808: Rhetoric, Technical Communication, and Theory

Saturday, 30 December 2000, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., Park Tower Suite 8210, Marriott Wardman Park

Program arranged by the Association of Teachers of Technical Writing. Presiding: Michael J. Goeller, Rutgers University, New Brunswick

  • “Isocrates: A `New’ Rhetorician for Technical Communication,” Angela M. Eaton, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
  • “Speech Act Theory and Hypertext Links,” Jenni A. Swenson, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
  • “Rhetoric and the Arts of Web Design,” Geoffrey F. K. Sauer, University of Washington
  • “Situated Knowledges, Embodied Information: Haraway’s Cyborg Rhetoric in Feminist Technical Communication Research,” Amy L. Koerber, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Other events and activities

The Women Writers Project and the Dickinson Electronic Archives Project will share a booth in the exhibition hall: Booth 912, in Exhibit Halls B and C, Marriott Wardman Park. The exhibit halls will be open on 28 and 29 December 2000 from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., and on 30 December 2000 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. (See The Brown Women Writers Project Online: “New” Texts, New Questions for a related session.)

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