Conferences Modern Language Association Digital Humanities Sessions

Guide to Humanities-Computing Talks at the 1999 MLA Convention

The Association for Computers and the Humanities has compiled this list of sessions with computing-related talks at the 1999 Modern Language Association Convention (in Chicago, Illinois, from December 27 through 30). Some of these sessions contain only one or two computing-related talks, but this list includes the entire program for each session.

In most cases you must pay the convention-registration fee in order to attend any of these talks. But two sessions are free and open to the public: “A Reading of Collaborative Texts from the World Wide Web”, and “Chaucer Futures: Graduate Study in the Twenty-First Century”.

Although the 1999 convention is now in the past, this information will remain available, as a record of what went on. Similar information for many other years is available via the main page on ACH MLA sessions.

Corrections and additions are welcome; please send them to John.Lavagnino@kcl.ac.uk.


Summary of Sessions


29: Technical Communication in Cyberspace

Monday, 27 December 1999, 3:30 to 4:45 p.m., Columbus Hall B, Hyatt Regency Chicago

Program arranged by the Association of Teachers of Technical Writing. Presiding: Patricia Elder Cearley, South Plains College, Texas

  • “Rhetorical Structure and Cohesion in Web Sites: Implications for Writing Teachers,” Glenn Broadhead, Oklahoma State University
  • “Developing Online Learning Environments: Designing for Communal Presence,” Beth Chrobot, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
  • “Disconnects in the Wired Laboratory: `Standard Symbols’ versus Ephemeral Pages,” Russell S. Clark, Scotia, New York
  • “Rhetoric and Virtuality in Cyberspace,” Myrth Jimmie Killingsworth, Texas A&M University, College Station; Martin M. Jacobsen, Texas A&M University, College Station

36: Technology and the Literature Classroom

Monday, 27 December 1999, 3:30 to 4:45 p.m., Colorado Room, Sheraton Chicago

Program arranged by the American Association of Teachers of German. Presiding: Rex Clark, University of Michigan, Dearborn

  • “Hypertext in the Literature Classroom: Hype or Help?” Monika Totten, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • “The Changing Role of the Student in the E-Literature Classroom,” Mark Lewis, Regis College
  • ” `Jugendliteratur’ and the Internet,” Anne Marie Green, Carnegie Mellon University
  • “The Evolution of a Multimedia Vision,” Louise E. Stoehr, University of Texas, Austin

54: The Old and the New: Editorial and Manuscript Research and the Challenge of the New Century

Monday, 27 December 1999, 5:15 to 6:30 p.m., Atlanta Room, Hyatt Regency Chicago

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Scholarly Editions. Presiding: Joseph V. Ricapito, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

  • “Pan-Hispanic Ballad Tradition and Web Site and Digital Methods,” Suzanne H. Petersen, University of Washington
  • “Bibliography of Ancient Galician and Portuguese Texts: Technology and Edition Research,” Harvey L. Sharrer, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • “The Poemo de Mío Cid: Two Comparisons,” Nancy Joe Dyer, Texas A&M University, College Station

60: Joycean Communities: Fictional, Biographical, Scholarly, Virtual, Imagined, …: A Communal Discussion

Monday, 27 December 1999, 5:15 to 6:30 p.m., Du Sable Room, Hyatt Regency Chicago

Program arranged by the International James Joyce Foundation. Presiding: Michael Groden, University of Western Ontario

Speakers: Christy L. Burns, College of William and Mary; Hoi F. Cheu, University of Western Ontario; Michael Patrick Gillespie, Marquette University; Patrick Colm Hogan, University of Connecticut, Storrs; Timothy P. Martin, Rutgers University, Camden; Mark Nunes, Georgia Perimeter College; Bonnie Kime Scott, University of Delaware, Newark


101: The Impact of Technology

Monday, 27 December 1999, 7:00 to 8:15 p.m., Haymarket Room, Hyatt Regency Chicago

Program arranged by the Association for Computers and the Humanities. Presiding: Julia H. Flanders, Brown University

  • “Digital Alchemy and the Three R’s of XML (Research, Writing, and Rendition): a report on a pilot application and implementation of Electronic Dissertations at the University of Iowa,” John Robert Gardner, University of Iowa
  • “School-to-Work,” Michelle Glaros, Dakota State University
  • “The Inscriptive Community: Networks and Subjects in the Classroom,” Thomas Akbari, Rutgers University, New Brunswick

Further information is available on the World Wide Web.


144: Life Writing and the Visual

Tuesday, 28 December 1999, 8:30 to 9:45 a.m., Water Tower Room, Hyatt Regency Chicago

Program arranged by the Division on Autobiography, Biography, and Life Writing. Presiding: Hertha D. Sweet Wong, University of California, Berkeley

  • ” `Promiscuously Disposed’: Writing the Family in the Nineteenth-Century Family Album,” Daniel Novak, Princeton University
  • “Life Writing, Multimedia, and Art Spiegelman’s The Complete Maus,” Robert M. Franciosi, Grand Valley State University
  • “Postings from Hoochie Mama: Erika Lopez, Graphic Art, and the Poetics of Women’s Life Writing,” Laura Laffrado, Western Washington University
  • “Visualizing the Baroness’s Body/Self: Gender, Sexuality, and the Performative Diary,” Irene Gammel, University of Prince Edward Island

146: Social Dialects and Bilingualism in the Media and the World Wide Web

Tuesday, 28 December 1999, 8:30 to 9:45 a.m., Columbus Room A and B, Sheraton Chicago

Program arranged by the Division on Language and Society. Presiding: Patricia C. Nichols, San Jose State University

  • ” `Don’t Worry about “LaNgUaGe sKilLs” ‘: English as a Second Language on the Internet,” Jillana B. Enteen, University of Central Florida
  • “Language Alternation in Bilingual Magazines,” Cecilia Montes-Alcala, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • ” `Catching Big Air’: Constructing a Category of Extreme Sports through the Language of `Riding’,” Munkyung A. Kang, University of California, Santa Barbara

147: Innovative Perspectives on Technology

Tuesday, 28 December 1999, 8:30 to 9:45 a.m., Grand Ballroom D South, Hyatt Regency Chicago

Program arranged by the Division on Teaching as a Profession. Presiding: Darren R. Cambridge, University of Texas, Austin

  • “New Media, the Humanities, and the Persistence of the Ordinary,” Michael Joyce, Vassar College
  • “Using Technology to Support Student Learning,” Morri Safran, University of Texas, Austin
  • “How Networked Computing Erodes the Teaching-Research Distinction,” Eric S. Rabkin, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

153: Quantitative Analysis of Aspects of Style

Tuesday, 28 December 1999, 8:30 to 9:45 a.m., Columbus Hall B, Hyatt Regency Chicago

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Computer Studies in Language and Literature. Presiding: Michael Neuman, Georgetown University

  • “Are Texts Recognizably Gendered? An Experiment and Analysis,” Malcolm Hayward, Indiana University of Pennsylvania
  • “The Particular Prosody of Tyard’s Erreurs amoureuses,” Henry P. Biggs, Houghton College
  • “The Stylistic Significance of Common English Words,” David L. Hoover, New York University

178: Girling Popular Culture

Tuesday, 28 December 1999, 10:15 to 11:30 a.m., Water Tower Room, Hyatt Regency Chicago

Program arranged by the Division on Popular Culture. Presiding: Cynthia J. Fuchs, George Mason University

  • “Proving What I’ve Got to Prove: Pop Culture, Sex, and the New Girl Power,” Cynthia J. Fuchs
  • ” `Ahem, We Are Not Horny Thai Girls’: Resisting the Thai Girl Image on the Internet,” Jillana B. Enteen, University of Central Florida
  • “High School in Beverly Hills: Class Fictions and the Jewish American Princess,” Andrea Beth Levine, Georgetown University

209: Editing in the Digital Age: W. B. Yeats and Marianne Moore

Tuesday, 28 December 1999, 10:15 to 11:30 a.m., Acapulco Room, Hyatt Regency Chicago

Program arranged by the Association for Documentary Editing. Presiding: Richard J. Finneran, University of Tennessee, Knoxville

  • “Exploring the Electronic Environment with the Yeats Prototype,” George J. Bornstein, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • “Exploring the Electronic Environment with the Chadwyck-Healey W. B. Yeats Collection,” William H. O’Donnell, University of Memphis
  • “Authorial Selection and Editorial Practice: Toward an Electronic Edition of Marianne Moore’s Early Poems,” Robin G. Schulze, Penn State University, University Park

243: Medieval Literature on the Web

Tuesday, 28 December 1999, noon to 1:15 p.m., Grand Ballroom D South, Hyatt Regency Chicago

A special session.

  • ” `It’s Alive’: Reanimating Scholarly Projects in Medieval Literature Using the World Wide Web,” Josephine Koster Tarvers, Winthrop University
  • “Wulfstan’s Eschatological Homilies: A Hypertext Edition,” Joyce Lionarons, Ursinus College
  • “The English Peasant Revolt of 1381 on the Web: A Framed Hyperlinked Site,” Grover C. Furr, Montclair State University

289: Getting Some Distance on Distance Education

Tuesday, 28 December 1999, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., Columbus Hall B, Hyatt Regency Chicago

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Community Colleges. Presiding: Carolyn L. Jacobs, Houston Community College, Texas

  • “Teaching Foreign Languages to Distance Students,” Daniel Eisenberg, Regents College
  • “Distance Learning and Authority: An Interdisciplinary Problem Brought to Composition,” Linda Myers-Breslin, Texas Tech University
  • “Make the Connection: What Oprah Taught Me about Teaching Telecommunication Courses,” Lucindy Willis, North Carolina State University
  • “Preserving Community in the Community College: The Interactive Video Network,” Carolyn Buckley-Fletcher, George Mason University

295: Technical Communication, Ethics, and Privacy

Tuesday, 28 December 1999, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., Acapulco Room, Hyatt Regency Chicago

Program arranged by the Association of Teachers of Technical Writing. Presiding: Kirk St. Amant, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

  • “Historicizing Interactivity: What a Critical Examination Reveals about Cyberspace Teaching Technologies,” Kelli Cargile Cook, Texas Tech University
  • “An Apology for Cyberethnography,” Cindy Nahrwold, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces
  • “Toss Your Cookies! Preserving a Measure of Privacy in Online Communications,” John H. Logie, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
  • “Public versus Private: Balancing the Demands of Online Information through Online Pedagogy,” Elizabeth Ruth Pass, James Madison University

296: The “New” Computer-Assisted Literary Criticism: What Does it Look Like? What Will it Look Like?

Tuesday, 28 December 1999, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., Field Room, Hyatt Regency Chicago

Program arranged by the Association for Computers and the Humanities. Presiding: Raymond G. Siemens, Malaspina University-College

  • “Electric Theory (Truth, Use, and Method),” Tamise J. Van Pelt, Idaho State University
  • “French Neo-Structuralist Schools and Industrial Text Analysis,” William Glen Winder, University of British Columbia
  • “A Theory for Literature (Created for the World Wide Web, E-Mail, Chat Spaces, Databases, and Other Electronic Technologies),” Dene M. Grigar, Texas Woman’s University
  • “Computer-Mediated Discourse, Reception Theory, and Versioning,” Susan Schreibman, University College Dublin

Further information is available on the World Wide Web.


326: Looking Glasses: Reflections on Vision Machines

Tuesday, 28 December 1999, 3:30 to 4:45 p.m., Picasso Room, Hyatt Regency Chicago

A special session; session leader: Brenda R. Silver, Dartmouth College

  • “Rewriting Nature,” Joanna Magali Picciotto, Princeton University
  • “A Self-Conscious Looking Glass,” Geoffrey Batchen, University of New Mexico
  • “First Contact: Narratives of Cyberspace,” Wendy H. Chun, Brown University

334: Reinventing Undergraduate Pedagogy II

Tuesday, 28 December 1999, 3:30 to 4:45 p.m., Columbus Room A and B, Sheraton Chicago

Program arranged by the MLA Office of Foreign Language Programs. Presiding: Arthur D. Mosher, University of Dayton

  • “Integrating Language Instruction and Cultural Inquiry through Reading,” Hiram Hamilton Maxim, University of Texas, Austin
  • “Technically Speaking: Transforming Language/Learning into Cultural Studies through Virtual Learning Environments,” Silke Von Der Emde, Vassar College

349: A Reading of Collaborative Texts from the World Wide Web

Tuesday, 28 December 1999, 5:15 to 6:30 p.m., Grand Ballroom D South, Hyatt Regency Chicago

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Computers and Emerging Technologies in Teaching and Research. Presiding: Stuart Moulthrop, University of Baltimore

Speaker: Rob Wittig, Chicago, Illinois


386: Queer Visuals on the Verge…

Tuesday, 28 December 1999, 7:15 to 8:30 p.m., Truffles Room, Hyatt Regency Chicago

Program arranged by the Division on Film. Presiding: Chris Holmlund, University of Tennessee, Knoxville

  • “When Maria Montez and Karl Marx Collide: Queer Film Theory and the Scholarly Fan,” Alexander Doty, Lehigh University
  • “The Emerging Queer Voice: The Video Underground of the 1980s and 1990s,” Kate Horsfield, Video Data Bank
  • “Fans and Their `Cruel Intentions’: Unofficial Celebrity Web Sites and Queer Desire,” Ronald E. Gregg, WPA Film Archive

Respondent: Patricia White, Swarthmore College

390: Technology and the Teaching of Writing: Possibilities and Challenges

Tuesday, 28 December 1999, 7:15 to 8:30 p.m., Acapulco Room, Hyatt Regency Chicago

Program arranged by the Division on the Teaching of Writing. Presiding: Deborah H. Holdstein, Governors State University

  • “Effective Technology, Pedagogical Problems?” Linda Jean Breslin, Texas Tech University
  • “Cross-Cultural Teaching Partnerships: Technological Challenges and Possibilities,” Joseph F. Trimmer, Ball State University; Jeffrey C. White, Ball State University
  • “Teaching Teachers to Teach Writing: Vygotsky in the Collaborative Computer Classroom,” Linda Carro, Humboldt State University; Nancy Knowles, University of Connecticut, Storrs

400: Caught in a Web? Liberal Arts Teaching in the Information Age

Tuesday, 28 December 1999, 7:15 to 8:30 p.m., Stetson Room G, Hyatt Regency Chicago

A special session; session leader: Shawn Patrick Gillen, Beloit College

  • “Information Technology, Cultural Tradition, and Humanist Teaching,” Yuan Shu, Indiana University, Bloomington
  • “Caught in a Web: Mentoring in a Digital Society,” Lisa M. Toner, Wheeling Jesuit University
  • “Interpretive Authority and the Online Discussion,” John H. Ottenhoff, Alma College

Respondent: Shawn Patrick Gillen

412: Evaluating and Supporting Academic Work in the Digital Age I

Tuesday, 28 December 1999, 7:15 to 8:30 p.m., Columbus Hall B, Hyatt Regency Chicago

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Computers and Emerging Technologies in Teaching and Research. Presiding: Douglas Morgenstern, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

  • “Evaluating Shifting Relationships: Teaching, Technology, Pedagogical Research, and Second Language Acquisition Research,” Nina Garrett, Yale University
  • “Rethinking New Media Guidelines in English Departments,” David Kaufer, Carnegie Mellon University; Geoffrey F. K. Sauer, Carnegie Mellon University
  • “The Construction of Value in Work That Is Always `Under Construction’ and/or Constructivist,” Kathryn Murphy-Judy, Virginia Commonwealth University

Respondent: Sarah Jane Sloane, University of Puget Sound


460: The New Variorum Shakespeare in the Electronic Medium

Wednesday, 29 December 1999, 8:30 to 9:45 a.m., Columbus Hall B, Hyatt Regency Chicago

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on the New Variorum Edition of Shakespeare. Presiding: Paul Werstine, University of Western Ontario

Speakers: Gregory Crane, Tufts University; Hilary Binda, Tufts University; David Smith, Tufts University


492: Distance Learning and the Humanities: A Roundtable

Wednesday, 29 December 1999, 10:15 to 11:30 a.m., Columbus Hall B, Hyatt Regency Chicago

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Computers and Emerging Technologies in Teaching and Research. Presiding: Gail E. Hawisher, University of Illinois, Urbana

  • “Adventures in Virtualand: An Online Children’s Literature Course,” Holly Blackford, University of California, Berkeley
  • “Motivation and (Self-)Discipline: College Composition and High School Remote Site Difficulties,” Christopher K. Brooks, Wichita State University
  • “Interactive Video Network as Highway for the Humanities,” Carolyn Buckley-Fletcher, University of Maryland, College Park
  • “Access for All: Web Delivery and Its Implications,” Steven M. Lane, Malaspina University-College
  • “Escaping the Wallpaper: Teaching Women’s Literature Online,”
  • “Increasing Online Interaction,” Abigail Bloom, New School for Social Research

Respondent: F. Tyler Curtain, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

505: Teaching and Learning German

Wednesday, 29 December 1999, 10:15 to 11:30 a.m., Parlor C, Sheraton Chicago

Program arranged by Delta Phi Alpha (National German Honor Society). Presiding: Michael E. Schultz, New York University

  • “Putting Technology in Its Place: Enhancing Listening Comprehension with Digitized Video,” Gary Lee Baker, Denison University
  • “Accent Reduction: Using Selected Phonetic Symbols to Improve Pronunciation in German,” John F. Reynolds, Longwood College
  • “Paintings, Postcards, and Photos: Visuals as Language and Culture Prompts,” Regina Braker, Eastern Oregon University

521: Black American Literature and Culture at the Millennium: New Technologies

Wednesday, 29 December 1999, noon to 1:15 p.m., Acapulco Room, Hyatt Regency Chicago

Program arranged by the Division on Black American Literature and Culture. Presiding: Farah Jasmine Griffin, University of Pennsylvania

  • “Technologies, Teach Knowledges: Developing an Electronic Pedagogy for African American Studies,” Lois Leveen, University of California, Los Angeles

558: Spanish Medieval Language and Literature

Wednesday, 29 December 1999, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., Ohio Room, Sheraton Chicago

Program arranged by the Division on Spanish Medieval Language and Literature.

  • “Romancing the Mooress in Reconquista Spain,” Gregory S. Hutcheson, University of Illinois, Chicago
  • ” `Mujeres y caníbales’: Rituales violentos en Grisel y Mirabella de Juan de Flores,” Alberto Prieto-Calixto, Vanderbilt University
  • Admyte and Syntactic Research on Medieval Spanish: Using the Automated Archive to Investigate the Evolution of Infinitive Constructions in Old Spanish,” Elizabeth P. Trainor, Universidad Complutense de Madrid

579: Books, Bytes, and Teaching: Technological Fixes or Junk Research?

Wednesday, 29 December 1999, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m.,

Program arranged by the Advisory Committee on the MLA International Bibliography. Presiding: Mark R. V. Southern, University of Texas, Austin; C. P. Haun Saussy, Stanford University

  • “Knitting (the Web) While the (Digital) Revolution Flickers By: Scholarly Publishing, Writing, Teaching, and Electronic Technologies,” James J. Bono, Configurations
  • “Learning Links: Reading, Writing, Information, the Web, and the World,” Jorge Tobias Marcone, Rutgers University, New Brunswick; Mary Lee Bretz, Rutgers University, New Brunswick
  • “Teaching Freshman Humanities by Impulse, Wave, and Feedback: Experiences from Stanford,” Mariatte Denman, Stanford University; C. P. Haun Saussy; Carlos R. Seligo, Stanford University
  • “Aiming to Please: Can Wired Academic Culture Keep the Subject in Its Sites?” Jolanda Vanderwal Taylor, University of Wisconsin, Madison

593: Desplazamientos: Women and Resistance

Wednesday, 29 December 1999, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., Parlor C, Sheraton Chicago

Program arranged by Feministas Unidas. Presiding: Linda Irene Koski, Santa Clara University; Dara E. Goldman, University of Illinois, Urbana

  • “Irse de Casa: A Feminist Time-Geography,” Joyce Lynn Tolliver, University of Illinois, Urbana
  • “Diaspora, Exile, and Migration: Movement and Sexuality in Recent Afro-American Women’s Narratives,” Margaret M. Olsen, University of Missouri, Columbia
  • “Traveling Folklóricas Bring Spain to the Americas: Ambiguous Role Models for Women in the 1940s and 1950s,” Eva Maria Woods, State University of New York, Stony Brook
  • “Virtual Voices, Electronic Bodies: Women and Resistance in Cyber-Chiapas,” Sarah L. Grussing, Macalester College
  • “Of Tortillas and Texts, Redux,” Jennifer Browdy De Hernandez, Simon’s Rock College of Bard

Papers are available through the organization’s Web site.


617: Old Texts, New Strategies: Researching and Teaching Early Women Writers Online

Wednesday, 29 December 1999, 3:30 to 4:45 p.m., Grand Ballroom D South, Hyatt Regency Chicago

A special session; session leader: Elizabeth H. Hageman, University of New Hampshire, Durham

  • “Inside the Black Box: Designing and Understanding Online Research Tools,” Julia H. Flanders, Brown University
  • “Using the Archives, Weaving the Web,” Frances Nicol Teague, University of Georgia
  • “A Home `upon the Way’: Travel Encounters with Two Seventeenth-Century Woman Quakers from the Women Writers Project,” Kirilka S. Stavreva, Saint Ambrose University
  • “The Goose’s Quill: Teaching Early Women Writers and the Challenge of Sources,” Jennifer Summit, Stanford University

626: Chaucer Futures: Graduate Study in the Twenty-First Century

Wednesday, 29 December 1999, 3:30 to 4:45 p.m., Acapulco Room, Hyatt Regency Chicago

A workshop arranged in conjunction with the forum “Millennial Chaucer: 1400/2000”. Presiding: Robert W. Hanning, Columbia University

  • “Fame’s Trumpet: Authorizing Chaucer in the Cyberspace Scriptorium,” Lauryn S. Mayer, Brown University
  • “New Exegetics: or, The Fourfold Interpretation of Chaucer,” Mary Agnes Edsall, Columbia University
  • “When Literature and Rhetoric Were One: Reuniting Graduate Studies through Chaucer,” Daniel J. Cleary, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
  • “Closing the Gap: Graduate Study and Undergraduate Teaching,” Erika Mae Olbricht, Pepperdine University
  • “Teaching Chaucer within the Crisis of Late Medieval Culture,” Richard Kenneth Emmerson, Medieval Academy of America
  • “The Interdisciplinary Chaucer,” Lisa J. Kiser, Ohio State University, Columbus

631: Graduate Education in Foreign Language for the Twenty-First Century

Wednesday, 29 December 1999, 3:30 to 4:45 p.m., Colorado Room, Sheraton Chicago

Program arranged by the MLA Advisory Committee on Foreign Languages and Literatures. Presiding: Diane Birckbichler, Ohio State University, Columbus

  • “What Language Professionals Need to Know about Technology,” Robert James Blake, University of California, Davis
  • “The GTA as Pedagogical Apprentice: An Enculturation Model for the Twenty-First Century,” Charles Grove, West Chester University; Gladys Vega Scott, Arizona State University, Tempe
  • “Redefining the Language Specialist,” Marilyn Gaddis Rose, State University of New York, Binghamton

635: The Awkward Stage I: Henry James and the Invention of Postmodernity

Wednesday, 29 December 1999, 3:30 to 4:45 p.m., San Francisco Room, Hyatt Regency Chicago

Program arranged by the Henry James Society. Presiding: Michael Anesko, Penn State University, University Park

  • “Henry James in Cyberspace: The James Family Listserv and the Evolution of Critical Discourse,” Cheryl B. Tornsey, University of West Virginia, Morgantown
  • “When Was There Not a Postmodern Henry James?” Pierre A. Walker, Salem State College
  • “Politics and Poetics of Postmodern Biographies of Henry James,” Olga Yurievna Antsyferova, Ivanovo State University, Russia

Respondent: David McWhirter, Texas A&M University, College Station


644: Business Meeting and Cash Bar Arranged by the Women’s Caucus for the Modern Languages, in Collaboration with the Brown University Women Writers Project, Feministas Unidas, Women in French, and Women in German

Wednesday, 29 December 1999, 5:15 to 6:30 p.m., Acapulco Room, Hyatt Regency Chicago


689: Electronic Editions: Who Will Read and How?

Wednesday, 29 December 1999, 7:15 to 8:30 p.m., Skyway Suite 280, Hyatt Regency Chicago

A special session; session leader: S. Chris Koenig-Woodyard, University of Oxford

  • “Scholarly Editions on the Web: The Example of The Last Man at Romantic Circles,”Steven E. Jones, Loyola University, Chicago
  • ” `Defining’ Electronic Editing; or, A Proleptic Review of the Collected Coleridge Poems”, S. Chris Koenig-Woodyard
  • “A Hypermedia Archive of Joanna Baillie’s Play De Monfort: Why and How?” Michael Eberle-Sinatra, University of Oxford

For more information, see the British Women Playwrights around 1800 web site.

702: Working in Publishing

Wednesday, 29 December 1999, 7:15 to 8:30 p.m., Columbus Hall B, Hyatt Regency Chicago

Program arranged by the MLA Office of English Programs. Presiding: James Ralph Papp, MLA

  • “What’s a Nice Kid like You Doing in a Place like This? The Scholar in Trade Publishing,” Michael Kandel, MLA
  • “Is There Room in the Well-Wrought Urn for Race, Class, and Gender? A Literary Journal and a Feminist Editor at the End of the Millennium,” Janet C. Wondra, Georgia Review
  • “Publishing Experience in and out of the Classroom,” Sharon E. Hamilton, Dalhousie University
  • “The Tower and the Web: Emigrés from English Lit Can Find Work in the Field of Online Information Architecture,” Liz Hines Kelleher, American Association of Retired Persons

720: Faulkner, Modernity, and Mechanization

Wednesday, 29 December 1999, 9:00 to 10:15 p.m., Toronto Room, Hyatt Regency Chicago

A special session;session leader: Patrick H. Samway, Saint Peter’s College

  • “The HTML Faulkner,” Thomas Porter, University of Alaska, Fairbanks
  • “Cars and Criminality: Faulkner in the Age of Automobility,” Deborah L. Clarke, Penn State University, University Park
  • “Mink’s Road to The Mansion: Modernity in Faulkner’s New South,” Thomas L. Wilmeth, Concordia University, Wisconsin

731: Writing the Circuit: Technology, Language Transmission, and Transformations in Linguistic Practice

Wednesday, 29 December 1999, 9:00 to 10:15 p.m., Burnham Room, Hyatt Regency Chicago

A special session; session leader: Jill Galvan, University of California, Los Angeles

  • “Coding the Signifier: Telegraph Code Books and Their Significance,” N. Katherine Hayles, University of California, Los Angeles
  • “Transmitting the Spirit: Occult Messages and Turn-of-the-Century Telecommunications,” Jill Galvan
  • “State of the Art: Language Precepts and Practices in the Modern Software Patent,” Dan Seward, University of Texas, Austin

744: From Observation to Analysis to Action: Confronting the Job Crisis

Thursday, 30 December 1999, 8:30 to 9:45 a.m., Acapulco Room, Hyatt Regency Chicago

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Part-Time Faculty Members. Presiding: John J. Regan, Boston University

  • “Regional Organizing, Reasonable Solutions, Real Impact,” Karen Thompson, Rutgers University, New Brunswick
  • “Perilous Travels: Computer-Mediated Education and Part-Time Academic Labor,” Carl W. Whithaus, Queens College, City University of New York
  • “Observing Action: Stories of What Works,” Richard Jewell, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
  • “Hey! That Adjunct Is Using the Wrong Fork: Humanizing the Part-Time Beast,” W. T. Pfefferle, Nova Southeastern University
  • “Taking Action, Making Policy: Improving Working Conditions through Governance,” Carla J. Love, University of Wisconsin, Madison

757: Evaluating and Supporting Academic Work in the Digital Age II

Thursday, 30 December 1999, 8:30 to 9:45 a.m., Water Tower Room, Hyatt Regency Chicago

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Computers and Emerging Technologies in Teaching and Research. Presiding: Donna Christine Van Handle, Mount Holyoke College

  • “Transforming Relationships: The Changing Roles of Students, Teachers, and Academic Institutions in the Digital Age,” Lori E. Amy, Georgia Southern University
  • “The CCCC Promotion and Tenure Guidelines for Work with Technology,” Susan M. Lang, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale
  • “Perpetual Editing and Academic Labor: Evaluating Hypertext Editions,” Neil Fraistat, University of Maryland, College Park; Carl G. Stahmer, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • “The Search for Respectability: Cutting-Edge Anxieties in a Digital Age,” Jack Lynch, Rutgers University, Newark

764: Humanities Futures II

Thursday, 30 December 1999, 8:30 to 9:45 a.m., Columbus Hall A, Hyatt Regency Chicago

Program arranged by the Society for Critical Exchange. Presiding: Max W. Thomas, University of Iowa

  • “New Media and the Future of the Humanities,” Michele S. Shauf, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • “Publishing Futures within (or without) the Humanities,” Geoffrey F. K. Sauer, Carnegie Mellon University
  • “McDonald’s U.: Virtual Technology and Humanities Futures in the Corporatized University,” Lina Carro, Humboldt State University; Nancy Knowles, University of Connecticut, Storrs

Papers will be available before the convention on the society’s web site.


779: Millennial Shakespeare

Thursday, 30 December 1999, 10:15 to 11:30 a.m., Gold Coast Room, Hyatt Regency Chicago

Program arranged by the Division on Shakespeare. Presiding: Kim Felicia Hall, Georgetown University

  • “Millennial Shakespeare: Magic in the Web?” Rebecca W. Bushnell, University of Pennsylvania
  • “The Public Speare,” Donald Keith Hedrick, Kansas State University
  • “Shakespeare’s Phantom Communities: Mourning, Messianicity, and the Past to Come,” Roger A. Starling, University of Toronto

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