Conferences Modern Language Association Digital Humanities Sessions

Guide to Humanities-Computing Talks at the 1998 MLA Convention

The Association for Computers and the Humanities has compiled this list of sessions with computing-related talks at the 1998 Modern Language Association Convention (in San Francisco, California, from December 27 through 30). Some of these sessions contain only one or two computing-related talks, but this list includes the entire program for each session.

In most cases you must pay the convention-registration fee in
order to attend any of these talks. But two sessions are free and open to the public: A Performance of Hypermedia Poetry and Fiction by Stephanie Strickland and M. D. Coverley, and Cyber Ed: Academic Labor and Technology.

Although the 1998 convention is now in the past, this information will remain available, as a record of what went on. Similar information for many other years is available via the main page on ACH MLA sessions.

Corrections and additions are welcome; please send them to John.Lavagnino@kcl.ac.uk.


Summary of Sessions


18: Technology and Writing Courses: New Trends, New Problems

Sunday, 27 December 1998, 3:30 to 4:45 p.m., Union Square 3 and 4, San Francisco Hilton

Program arranged by the Association for Business Communications.

  • “The Mouse That Roared: Computer-Assisted Writing and the Urban Women’s College,” Louis J. Boyle, Carlow College
  • “Voices Merged in Collaborated Conversation: The Peer-Critiquing Computer Project,” Mary E. Fakler, State University of New York, New Paltz; Joan E. Penisse, State University of New York, New Paltz
  • “Teaching Bizcom with Technology—and Liking It,” Paula Foster, Ohio State University, Columbus
  • “Technology, Distance, and Collaboration: Problems with Expanding Networked Pedagogies,” Linda Jean Myers, Texas Tech University

23: Computers and the Great Language-Literature, Research-Teaching Divides

Sunday, 27 December 1998, 3:30 to 4:45 p.m., Fountain Room, Fairmont Hotel

Program arranged by the Association for Computers and the Humanities. Presiding: Leslie Zarker Morgan, Loyola College, Maryland

  • “Bridging the Language-Literature Gap: Introducing Literature Electronically to the Undergraduate Language Student”, Mary Ann Lyman-Hager, San Diego State University
  • “The Computer as Catalyst: Where do Second Language Acquisition Research, Cultural Studies, and the Less-Commonly Taught Languages Fit In?”, Nina Garrett, Wesleyan University
  • “Computer Applications and Research Agendas: Another Dimension in Professional Advancement”, Robert Fischer, Southwest Texas State University

Further information is available on the World Wide Web.

25: Electronic Publishing and Tenure

Sunday, 27 December 1998, 3:30 to 4:45 p.m., California Room, Fairmont Hotel

Program arranged by the American Association of Teachers of German. Presiding: Albrecht Classen, University of Arizona

  • “Some Reflections on Electronic Publishing in the Context of Tenure and Promotion Decision Making: The Perspective of a Former Dean,” Judith Popovich Aikin, University of Iowa
  • “Ways to Being Published: From Drafts to Electronic Publishing to Journal Articles,” Dieter Jedan, Southeast Missouri State University
  • “Book Reviews Online: New Scholarly Endeavors, Western Michigan University,” Albrecht Classen
  • “Tenure and the Online Editor,” Joe Gene Delap, Kansas Wesleyan University

30: Problems in Germanic Linguistics

Sunday, 27 December 1998, 3:30 to 4:45 p.m., Garden Room, Fairmont Hotel

Program arranged by Delta Phi Alpha (National German Honor Society). Presiding: Michael E. Schultz, New York University

  • “Early Middle High German: Alliterating Word Pairs,” John Michael Jeep, Miami University, Ohio
  • “Transitivity and Prepositional Phrases,” Carlee L. Arnett, Ohio State University, Columbus
  • “German E-mail and Snail Mail Contrasted: Data from the Bay Area German Project,” C. Sean Ketchem, University of California, Berkeley; James Ritchie, University of California, Berkeley; Prisca S. Schuler, University of California, Berkeley

46: Blake and Hypertextuality

Sunday, 27 December 1998, 5:15 to 6:30 p.m., Franciscan Room A, San Francisco Hilton

Program arranged by the Wordsworth-Coleridge Association. Presiding: Alan Richardson, Boston College

  • “Difference, Repetition, and the Nature of an Artistic Work,” Terence Allan Hoagwood, Texas A&M University, College Station
  • “Constructing the William Blake Archive: A Progress Report and Demonstration,” Joseph Viscomi, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • “Revelation in the Digital Expression,” Nelson Hilton, University of Georgia
  • “The Iowa Blake Videodisc Project: A Cautionary History,” Mary Lynn Johnson, University of Iowa

48: International Technical Communication

Sunday, 27 December 1998, 5:15 to 6:30 p.m., Union Square 11, San Francisco Hilton

Program arranged by the Association of Teachers of Technical Writing. Presiding: Bill Karis, Clarkson University

  • “Twist, Tango, and Tarantella: International Technical Communication and the Dance of Cultures,” Sam A. Dragga, Texas Tech University
  • “The Americanization of the Web: Implications of Technologies’ Effects on International Communication and Strategies for Understanding International Audiences,” Elizabeth Ruth Pass, James Madison University

58: The Josephine A. Roberts Session: Electronic Editing and Publication

Sunday, 27 December 1998, 5:15 to 6:30 p.m., Union Square 1 and 2, San Francisco Hilton

Program arranged by the Renaissance English Text Society. Presiding: A. R. Braunmuller, University of California, Los Angeles

  • “Eclectic Circulation: The Functional Dynamics of Manuscript and Electronic Literary Cultures,” Margaret J. M Ezell, Texas A&M University, College Station
  • ” `What Two Crownes Shall They Be?’: `Lower’ Criticism, `Higher’ Criticism, and the Impact of Scholarly Publication in the Electronic Medium,” Raymond G. Siemens, University of Alberta
  • “Renaissance Texts and Text Encoding,” David M. Seaman, University of Virginia

77: Life Writing and Multimedia

Sunday, 27 December 1998, 7:00 to 8:15 p.m., Union Square 21, San Francisco Hilton

Program arranged by the Division on Autobiography, Biography, and Life Writing. Presiding: Martin Alan Danahay, University of Texas, Arlington

  • “Case History and Photography in Sheila Ortiz Taylor and Sandra Ortiz Taylor’s Imaginary Parents: A Family Autobiography,” Timothy Dow Adams, West Virginia University, Morgantown
  • “Pain as a Symptom of (Not) Dying: Making Time in Sick: The Life and Death of Bob Flanagan Supermasochist,” Tina Takemoto, University of Rochester
  • “Manuscript, Text, Hypertext: The Creation of a Literary Life Archive,” Susan Schreibman, University College, Dublin
  • “Authoring Public Selves on the Web: Feminist Anxieties and Legal Unknowns,” Beth E. Kolko, University of Texas, Arlington

103: Is Our Labor Academic?

Sunday, 27 December 1998, 7:00 to 8:15 p.m., Union Square 15 and 16, San Francisco Hilton

Program arranged by the Graduate Student Caucus. Presiding: Mark R. Kelley, Graduate Center, City University of New York

  • “Putting the Bottom on Top: Listening to the Graduate Student Caucus,” Cary Nelson, University of Illinois, Urbana
  • “Organizing Charm: Electronic Publishing and Academic Workplace Organization,” Kent Puckett, Columbia University
  • “At the Helm: Graduate Students and the Executive Council,” Kirsten M. Christensen, University of Texas, Austin
  • “Adjunct Labor and Race: A Historical Perspective,” Ian H. Marshall, Graduate Center, City University of New York

122: Ordinary Rhetoric and Writing II: Everyday Culture

Sunday, 27 December 1998, 9:00 to 10:15 p.m., Parlor 7, Continental Ballroom, San Francisco Hilton

Program arranged by the Division on History and Theory of Rhetoric and Composition. Presiding: Susan Passler Miller, University of Utah

  • “Netiquette: Electronic Sharing and Plagiarism,” Alison M. Fraiberg, University of Redlands
  • “Political Debates and University Democratization, 1920-50”, Jill A. Eicher, Wayne State University
  • “Popular Astrology, Science, and Social Class,” Ryan John Stark, Texas Christian University

129: Killing English with Technology

Sunday, 27 December 1998, 9:00 to 10:15 p.m., Union Square 11, San Francisco Hilton

A special session; session leader: Alexander Reid, GeorgiaInstitute of Technology

  • “Have Computers Killed Peer Writing Groups?” H. Richard Jewell, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
  • “Hypermedia in the Hermeneutic Circle: Using Computers to Teach Interpretation,” John Zuern, University of Hawaii, Manoa
  • “Sex in the Machine: The Electronic Mail Discussion List as Gendered Space,” Dale Jacobs, East Carolina University
  • “Student Ethos Issues in Computer-Assisted Writing and Literature Courses,” Mary Leonard, University of Wisconsin, Parkside

Respondent: Alexander Reid


163: Technology in Second-Language Learning: What Does Research Tell Us?

Monday, 28 December 1998, 8:30 to 9:45 a.m., California Room, Fairmont Hotel

Program arranged by the Division on Applied Linguistics. Presiding: Richard Kern, University of California, Berkeley

  • “What’s Computer-Mediated Communication Good For? Small Group Discussions and Computers in the Foreign Language Class,” Lynne Frame, University of San Francisco; Ilona Vandergriff, San Francisco State University
  • “The Effects of Technology on an Introductory French Curriculum: Implications for Foreign Language Learning and Teaching,” Carl S. Blyth, University of Texas, Austin
  • “Discourse Functions and Language Complexity in Synchronous and Asynchronous Communication,” Susana M. Sotillo, Montclair State University
  • “The Effects of Students’ Authoring of Multimedia Materials on Student Acquisition and Retention of Vocabulary,” Ofelia R. Nikolova, Southern Illinois State University

165: The Great War and Cultural Memory

Monday, 28 December 1998, 8:30 to 9:45 a.m.,Union Square 21, San Francisco Hilton

Program arranged by the Division on Twentieth-Century English Literature. Presiding: Brenda R. Silver, Dartmouth College

  • “The Great War and Postmodern Memory,” Michèle Barrett, City University, London
  • Fairy Tale: Prefiguring Digital Anxiety,” Mark J. Williams, Dartmouth College
  • ” `They Shall Grow Not Old’: `In Flanders Field’ on the World Wide Web,” Victor Ernest Luftig, Brandeis University

187: Camino de Santiago at the End of the Millennium

Monday, 28 December 1998, 8:30 to 9:45 a.m., Terrace Room, Fairmont Hotel

A special session; session leader: Pilar del Carmen Tirado, State University of New York, Plattsburgh

  • “A New Pilgrim’s Companion: Reassessing the `Libro de Huespedes’,” Thomas D. Spaccarelli, University of the South
  • “Camino de Santiago: Identidad cultural y modernidad en el fin de milenio,” Jose F. Colmeiro, Michigan State University
  • “Surfing the Camino: Cultural Crossings on the World Wide Web,” Elizabeth Dawn Boretz, Eastern Oregon University
  • “Pilgrimage to Santiago: A Contemporary Quest for Ancient Wisdom,” Pilar del Carmen Tirado

206: Ordinary Rhetoric and Writing III: Academic Life

Monday, 28 December 1998, 10:15 to 11:30 a.m., Parlor 7, Continental Ballroom, San Francisco Hilton

Program arranged by the Division on History and Theory of Rhetoric and Composition. Presiding: David Bleich, University of Rochester

  • “Faculty Descriptions of Teaching Materials,” Cornelius Cosgrove, Slippery Rock University; Nancy Ann Barta-Smith, Slippery Rock University
  • “Intellectual Intimacy: Mixing Personal and Formal Writing,” Louise Zanberg Smith, University of Massachusetts, Boston
  • “E-mail Mixing of Academic and Personal Lives,” Patricia R. Webb, Arizona State University
  • “Writing Center Conversations as a Source for Theory,” Jessica B. Yood, State University of New York, Stony Brook

230: Adjunct Faculty: Slouching toward Equity

Monday, 28 December 1998, 10:15 to 11:30 a.m., Union Square 21, San Francisco Hilton

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Community Colleges. Presiding: Pamela Ann Lim-McAlister, Vista Community College, California

  • “Searching for Good Practice in the Employment of Adjunct Faculty Members,” Jane Harper, Tarrant County Junior College, Northeast Campus, Texas
  • “Creating Web Sites for Adjuncts: Home Pages for the Homeless,” Suellyn Winkle, Santa Fe Community College, Florida; Stephen John Robitaille, Santa Fe Community College, Florida
  • “Unions, Politicians, and Faculty Positions,” Karen Schermerhorn, Community College of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

233: The Creation and Use of Electronic Editions

Monday, 28 December 1998, 10:15 to 11:30 a.m., Union Square 1 and 2, San Francisco Hilton

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Scholarly Editions. Presiding: John Unsworth, University of Virginia

  • “Scholarship and Pedagogy in the Kansas `Bartleby’ Edition,” Haskell S. Springer, University of Kansas
  • “Shakespearean Apparatus? Explicit Textual Structures and the Implicit Navigation of Accumulated Knowledge,” Raymond G. Siemens, University of Alberta
  • “Toward an Electronic Edition of `The Yellow Wall-paper’,” Shawn Richard St. Jean, Kent State University, Kent

243: Teaching and Learning German

Monday, 28 December 1998, 10:15 to 11:30 a.m., Far East Room, Fairmont Hotel

Program arranged by Delta Phi Alpha (National German Honor Society). Presiding: John F. Reynolds, Longwood College

  • “Redesigning German Language and Culture Teaching: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Cultural Literacy and the Use of Multimedia Technology,” Margarete B. Lamb-Faffelberger, Lafayette College
  • “Motivating and Activating Students in German Classes,” Maria Luise Caputo-Mayr, Temple University

249: The Seventeenth Century in the Media: Cinema, Television, World Wide Web, CD-ROM

Monday, 28 December 1998, noon to 1:15 p.m., Far East Room, Fairmont Hotel

Program arranged by the Division on Seventeenth-Century French Literature. Presiding: Richard E. Goodkin, University of Wisconsin, Madison

  • “Separated at Birth: The Man in the Iron Mask; or, A Louis XIV for the Nineties,” Richard E. Goodkin
  • “Surfing Le Dix-Septième: Accessing French Literature on the World Wide Web,” Margaret M. Bolovan, Ohio State University, Columbus
  • “Hearing the Invisible: Baroque Power and Sexuality in Tous les matins du monde,” Marie-Michelle Strah, Cornell University
  • “Dandin on the Big Screen of History,” James F. Gaines, Southeastern Louisiana University

250: Approaches to Teaching Iberian Medieval Literature

Monday, 28 December 1998, noon to 1:15 p.m., California Room, Fairmont Hotel

Program arranged by the Division on Spanish Medieval Language and Literature. Presiding: Ivy Ann Corfis, University of Wisconsin, Madison

  • ” `I Never Thought I Would Survive This Class’: Teaching Strategies for Ensuring the Survival of Undergraduates in Medieval Spanish Literature Classes,” Noel Fallows, University of Georgia
  • “Let the Text Speak for Itself: Using Exempla to Teach the Iberian Middle Ages,” James A. Grabowska, College of Saint Benedict
  • “Teaching Cancionero Poetry: Facilitating Intensive Reading through Libra Software,” Stephen Dudley Johnson, Southwest Texas University

281: Making Text Smarter: Three Case Studies

Monday, 28 December 1998, noon to 1:15 p.m., Union Square 10, San Francisco Hilton

Program arranged by the Association for Documentary Editing. Presiding: John Merritt Unsworth, University of Virginia


295: Interdisciplinary Work in German Cultural Studies I: Teaching

Monday, 28 December 1998, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., California Room, Fairmont Hotel

Program arranged by the Division on Nineteenth- and Early-Twentieth-Century German Literature. Presiding: Sara Friedrichsmeyer, University of Cincinnati

  • “Mode d’Emploi: Assembly Kit for a Course in Nineteenth-Century German Cultural Studies,” Irene Kacandes, Dartmouth College
  • “Teaching Music and Literature: The German Tradition,” Jean Leventhal, Wellesley College
  • “Teaching the Weimar Republic to the Post-Generation X Student,” Barbara Mennel, Bates College
  • “Vienna 1900: An Interdisciplinary Web Site,” Richard T. Gray, University of Washington; Sabine Wilke, University of Washington

296: Language and the World Wide Web

Monday, 28 December 1998, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., Union Square 10, San Francisco Hilton

Program arranged by the Division on Language and Society. Presiding: Janet Elizabeth Gardner, University of Massachusetts, North Dartmouth

  • “Academic MOO-ing and the Need to Be Heard: The Language of MOOs and Their Effects on Scholarly Publications,” Patricia R. Webb, Arizona State University
  • “Kibitzing on the Net: Variation in Discourse among Observers at an Internet Bridge Game,” Cynthia Goldin Bernstein, Auburn University
  • “French on the Net: The Latest Language War,” Kenneth Troy Rivers, Lamar University
  • “Cats, Chicks, and Spiderwomen: Images of Women on the Web,” Lisa Gerrard, University of California, Los Angeles

335: The Media and Language Change

Monday, 28 December 1998, 3:30 to 4:45 p.m., Union Square 1 and 2, San Francisco Hilton

Program arranged by the Division on Language Change. Presiding: Leslie K. Arnovick, University of British Columbia

  • ” `That Big of a Deal’: The Normalization of Popular Discourse,” Susan M. Fitzmaurice, Northern Arizona University
  • “Race and the Rise of Network Standard American,” Thomas Paul Bonfiglio, University of Richmond
  • “Variation and Change in E-Mail Style,” Susan C. Herring, University of Texas, Arlington
  • “Language Change through the Internet,” Dieter Stein, University of Düsseldorf

341: Computer Methods in the Study of Literature and Theory

Monday, 28 December 1998, 3:30 to 4:45 p.m., Union Square 17 and 18, San Francisco Hilton

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Computer Studies in Language and Literature. Presiding: Gina L. Greco, Portland State University

  • “The Computer and the Canon of Daniel Defoe,” Joseph Rudman, Carnegie Mellon University
  • “Making Use of Statistical Measures of Style,” David L. Hoover, New York University
  • “Using Hypermedia to Teach Literary Analysis and Theory,” John Zuern, University of Hawaii, Manoa

359: Digital Rhetorics: Readers, Writers, Publishers I—Electronic Literary Texts in Languages Other Than English

Monday, 28 December 1998, 3:30 to 4:45 p.m., California Room, Fairmont Hotel

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Computers and Emerging Technologies in Teaching and Research. Presiding: David Bristol Dollenmayer, Worcester Polytechnic Institute

  • “The Enigmatic (Hi)Stories of Kaspar Hauser,” Gabriele A. Wittig Davis, Mount Holyoke College; Robert Chapin Davis, Smith College
  • “Hypermedia: A Nonmodern Approach to Literary Studies,” Dorothy Diehl, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • “Same Texts, New Delivery (Con)Textos: Literatura Hispanoamericana en Multimedia,” Julia E. Aguilar, University of Pennsylvania; José Miguel Oviedo, University of Pennsylvania

428: The Same River Twice: Time Representation in Hypertext Literature

Monday, 28 December 1998, 7:15 to 8:30 p.m., Union Square 10, San Francisco Hilton

A special session; session leader: N. Katherine Hayles, University of California, Los Angeles

  • “Dalí Clocks: Time Dimensions of Hypertext,” Stephanie Strickland, New York, New York
  • “Into the Light: Time in the Fluctuating Universe,” Christy Sheffield Sanford, Gainesville, Florida
  • “The Mechanical Muse: Hypertext Constraints on Composition,” Ellen Strenski, University of California, Irvine
  • “Circles and Sediments: Creation of Time in Hypertext Fiction,” Marjorie C. Luesebrink, Irvine Valley College, California

448: The Aesthetics of Paranoia, circa 2000

Tuesday, 29 December 1998, 8:30 to 9:45 a.m., Plaza Room B, San Francisco Hilton

Program arranged by the Division on Psychological Approaches to Literature. Presiding: Jerry Aline Flieger, Rutgers University, New Brunswick

  • “We the Paranoid 2,” Peter T. Starr, University of Southern California
  • “Reading Schreher with Derrida: Archive Fever as Symptom,” Eric Lawrence Santner, University of Chicago
  • “Digital Paranoia,” Heidi L. Gilpin, University of Hong Kong

Respondent: Jerry Aline Flieger

474: Digital Rhetorics: Readers, Writers, and Publishers II—Electronic Literary Texts in English

Tuesday, 29 December 1998, 8:30 to 9:45 a.m., Union Square 10, San Francisco Hilton

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Computers and Emerging Technologies in Teaching and Research. Presiding: J. R. Colavito, Northwestern State University of Louisiana

  • “Using Hypertextual Literature to Promote Interactive Learning and Interdisciplinarity,” Molly Abel Travis, Tulane University
  • “Seriously Animated: Toward a Rhetoric of the Visually Moving and Interactive,” Anne Frances Wysocki, Michigan Technological University
  • “WAX, Hypermedia, and Textual Materialism,” Matthew G. Kirschenbaum, University of Virginia
  • “The Thomas MacGreevy Hypertext Chronology: Digitizing Irish Archives for the Next Millennium,” Susan Schreibman, University College, Dublin

501: Legislating Language

Tuesday, 29 December 1998, 10:15 to 11:30 a.m., Union Square 1 and 2, San Francisco Hilton

Program arranged by the Division on Language Change

  • “Traditional and Computational Stylistics: Changing Authorship Attribution in the Courts,” Helen Aristar Dry, Eastern Michigan University
  • “Language Science: The Ideological Secret Weapon of Language Planning,” José del Valle, Miami University, Oxford
  • “Legislating Guaraní: Can Law Save a Language?” Shaw N. Gynan, Western Washington University
  • “The Emergence of a National Language Policy in Cuba,” James K. Archibald, McGill University

503: Chaucer in the Classroom and the Curriculum of the Twenty-First Century

Tuesday, 29 December 1998, 10:15 to 11:30 a.m., Franciscan Room A, San Francisco Hilton

Program arranged by the Division on Chaucer. Presiding: Elaine Hansen, Haverford College

  • “Chaucer’s Theoretical (Ir)Relevance,” Richard Robert Glejzer, North Central College
  • “Queer Chaucer in the Classroom,” Glenn D. Burger, University of Alberta; Steven F. Kruger, University of Alberta
  • “Chaucer Had Adam Scryven, We Have Bill Gates,” Susan K. Hagen, Birmingham-Southern College
  • “Low-Tech Chaucer: An Iambic Alternative to the Analytical Paper,” Peter Grant Beidler, Lehigh University
  • “Teaching the Dream-Visions in a Non-Chaucerian Context,” Maud Burnett McInerney, Haverford College
  • ” `Of hir felaweship anon’: Addressing the Audience(s) of the Chaucer Web Site Consortium Project,” Daniel T. Kline, University of Alaska, Anchorage

529: The Content-Provider as Colleague: Creating Institutional Spaces for New Media Teaching and Research

Tuesday, 29 December 1998, 10:15 to 11:30 a.m., Union Square 22, San Francisco Hilton

Program arranged by the Association for Computers and the Humanities. Presiding: Matthew G. Kirschenbaum, University of Virginia

  • “The Problems of New Technology in the Old Academy”, David Lee Gants, University of Georgia
  • “A New Hybridity: The University as Web Site Publisher”, Neil Fraistat, University of Maryland, College Park; Diane Krejsa, University of Maryland, College Park
  • “ok computer: Professing Literature in the Para-Economy”, Joseph Tabbi, University of Illinois, Chicago

A talk originally scheduled for this session—“Intellectual Property/Community Property: The Cultural Contradictions of New Media Pedagogy”, by
Randy Bass of Georgetown University—has been cancelled.

Further information is available on the World Wide Web.


553: Metaphors and Computer Technologies; or, How to Deconstruct the Information Age

Tuesday, 29 December 1998, noon to 1:15 p.m., Union Square 13, San Francisco Hilton

A special session; session leader: Wayne V. Miller, University of California, Los Angeles

  • “The Computer and the Information Revolution: A Myth of the Information Age,” Wayne V. Miller
  • “The Internet as Advertising Narrative: Money for Nothing and Info for Free,” Bernd Klaus Estabrook, Illinois College
  • “Uncovering the Impossibility of `Being Digital’,” Robert S. Bledsoe, Rice University

Papers and discussion area will be available by 1 December on the World Wide Web.

559: The Future of Literary History: Anthologies and the Changing Shape of the Past

Tuesday, 29 December 1998, noon to 1:15 p.m., Plaza Room B, San Francisco Hilton

A special session; session leader: David Damrosch, Columbia University

  • “Editing Textbooks without Shame,” Gerald Graff, University of Chicago
  • “The Future of an Illusion: Why Anthologies Make Bad `Textbooks’,” Marjorie G. Perloff, Stanford University
  • “A New Literary Geography: British Literary History Today,” David Damrosch
  • “Ibsen on Disk: Text and Context on CD-ROM,” Jerome C. Christensen, Johns Hopkins University

569: Digital Rhetorics: Readers, Writers, and Publishers III

Tuesday, 29 December 1998, noon to 1:15 p.m., Franciscan Room A, San Francisco Hilton

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Computers and Emerging Technologies in Teaching and Research. Presiding: Gail E. Hawisher, University of Illinois, Urbana

  • “Copyright and the Politics of Student Writing,” Andrea A. Lunsford, Ohio State University, Columbus
  • “The Problem of Authorship and the Promises of Networked Communication,” Michael S. Greer, National Council of Teachers of English
  • “Beyond Argument: Hypermedia and Pluralism in the Age of Obsolescence,” J. Yellowlees Douglas, University of Florida
  • “Words to the Reader, Profits to the Writer: How an Internet Firm Learned to Publish Quality Work for Less While Paying the Writer More,” Jon Reynolds, Raleigh News and Observer

574: Adventures in the Corporatized Classroom

Tuesday, 29 December 1998, noon to 1:15 p.m., Union Square 21, San Francisco Hilton

Program arranged by the Radical Caucus in English and the Modern Languages. Presiding: John Alberti, Northern Kentucky University

  • “Thinkpad U: Electronic Citizenship and the Public Sphere,” Rebecca C. Hyman, University of Virginia
  • “Encrypted Colleagues Consuming Students: The Politics of Technoculture,” Bruce Krajewski, Laurentian University
  • “Can Disciplinary Knowledge Survive Corporatization?” David R. Shumway, Carnegie Mellon University

Respondent: Donald Keith Hedrick, Kansas State University


581A: Cyber Ed: Academic Labor and Technology

Tuesday, 29 December 1998, 1:45 to 3:30 p.m., Continental Ballroom 6, San Francisco Hilton

A forum. Presiding: Laura L. Sullivan, University of Florida

  • “Notes on a Manifesto for Graduate Student Labor in the Electronic Classroom,” Stephanie L. Tripp, University of Florida
  • “Does Technology Really Cause Unemployment?” Andrew T. I. Ross, New York University
  • “The Challenges of the Future: Passion, People, and Technology,” Annette Kolodny, University of Arizona
  • “Like a Pear: Institutional Impact of Telecourses that Teach English,” Randolph Acetta, University of Arizona

607: The Object in Cyberspace

Tuesday, 29 December 1998, 1:45 to 3:00 p.m., Union Square 17 and 18, San Francisco Hilton

A special session; session leader: Biswarup Sen, Sigma Marketing Group

  • “Post-Cartesian Objects and the Making of Virtual Reality,” Biswarup Sen
  • “Prosthetic Culture: Credit, Debt, and the Extension of Self,” Andreas Gerrot Kitzmann, University of Skovde, Sweden
  • “Equatorial Savage as Radically Chic: Geographies of Desire in the Age of Global Multiculturalism,” Kavita S. Philip, Georgia Institute of Technology

Respondent: Virginia E. Eubanks, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute


631: Narrative in Science: Making It Visible

Tuesday, 29 December 1998, 3:30 to 4:45 p.m., Franciscan Room A, San Francisco Hilton

Program arranged by the Division on Literature and Science. Presiding: N. Katherine Hayles, University of California, Los Angeles

  • “The Emergence of the Posthuman: Dawkins and Deleuze,” N. Katherine Hayles
  • “Computer Visualization and Postmodern Narrative,” Timothy Lenoir, Stanford University
  • “Narratives about the Speed of Light,” Luis O. Arata, Quinnipiac College

659: Distance Education and Technical Communication

Tuesday, 29 December 1998, 3:30 to 4:45 p.m., Union Square 11, San Francisco Hilton

Program arranged by the Association of Teachers of Technical Writing. Presiding: Patricia Elder Cearley, South Plains College

  • “Question: What Did You Like Best about Your Online Course in Technical and Professional Writing? Answer: Anonymity,” George Edward Kennedy, Washington State University, Pullman; Ann Marie Garnsey, Washington State University, Pullman

667: A Performance of Hypermedia Poetry and Fiction by Stephanie Strickland and M. D. Coverley

Tuesday, 29 December 1998, 5:15 to 6:30 p.m., Parlor 2, Continental Ballroom, San Francisco Hilton

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Computers and Emerging Technologies in Teaching and Research


715: British Women Playwrights around 1800: Possibilities for Electronic Editing

Tuesday, 29 December 1998, 7:15 to 8:30 p.m., Union Square 1 and 2, San Francisco Hilton

A special session; session leader: Julia H. Flanders, Brown University

  • “Access, Authorship, Archives, Historiography: Some Questions for Electronic Editing of Women’s Theater Materials,” Thomas C. Crochunis, Cambridge, Massachusetts
  • “Teaching Women’s Theatrical Texts and Contexts,” Katherine Newey, University of Wollongong
  • “On Editing Women Playwrights’ Works in an Electronic Environment,” Michael Laplace-Sinatra, Oxford University
  • “Real Editions for Real People: Editing and Encoding Women’s Theater Texts and Materials,” Julia H. Flanders; Lauryn S. Mayer, Brown University

718: Hypertext in Print?

Tuesday, 29 December 1998, 7:15 to 8:30 p.m., Parlor 2, Continental Ballroom, San Francisco Hilton

A special session; session leader: William Cole, University of Georgia

  • “(Inter)Facing Pages: Staging the Scene of Reading in Print and Electronic Texts,” James Thomas Stevens, Cornell University
  • “Hypertext in Print? Encyclopedias and Encyclopedia Novels,” Martina E. Linnemann, University of Warwick
  • “The Struggle between Author and Reader in Vladimir Nabokov’s Pale Fire,” Laurie Frances Leach, Hawaii Pacific University

Respondent: William Cole

734: New Technologies, New Ethical Challenges

Tuesday, 29 December 1998, 7:15 to 8:30 p.m., Union Square 13, San Francisco Hilton

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Academic Freedom and Professional Rights and Responsibilities. Presiding: Nona Fienberg, Keene State College

  • “Keeping in Touch and out of Trouble: E-mail, the Web, and the Job Search,”
    Maura Carey Ives, Texas A&M University, College Station
  • “A Dissertation in Cyberspace,” Jo Malin, State University of New York, Binghamton
  • “The Ethics of Teaching with Technology: The `Medium’ versus the `Message’,” Joel Goldfield, Fairfield University

747: Postmodern Site, Prose Medium: Gender, Sex, and Money on the Net

Tuesday, 29 December 1998, 9:00 to 10:15 p.m., Squire Room, Fairmont Hotel

Program arranged by the Division on Nonfictional Prose. Presiding: Paul Lauter, Trinity College

  • “From Ulysses to Usenet: The Mythography of the New Frontier,” Virginia E. Eubanks, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
  • Gay.com, Second Floor,” Thomas Leon Loebel, York University, North York
  • “How My Dick Spent Its Summer Vacation: Internet Sex Diaries by Tourists Returning from Thailand,” Ryan Bishop, Southern Methodist University; Lillian S. Robinson, East Carolina University

Respondent: Paul Lauter

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