Conferences Modern Language Association Digital Humanities Sessions

Guide to Digital-Humanities Talks at the 2008 MLA Convention

 

Digital Humanities Sessions – MLA 2008

Digital Humanities Sessions – MLA 2006The Association for Computers and the Humanities has compiled this list of sessions with digital-humanities talks at the 2008 Modern Language Association Convention (in San Francisco from December 27 through 30). Some of these sessions contain only one or two relevant talks, but this list includes the entire program for each session.

In most cases you must pay the convention-registration fee in order to attend these talks. But five sessions are free and open to the public: “Scholarly Editing in the Twenty-First Century: Digital Media and Editing”, “The Way We Teach Now”, “Biocultures: Closing the Science-Humanities Gap”, “Our Affection for Books”, and “Editing Manuscripts in Digital and Print Forms”, MLA talks are published at the discretion of their authors; if you want to obtain the text of a talk you were unable to attend, the best method is to contact the author directly.

Although the 2008 convention is now in the past, this information will remain available, as a record of what went on. Similar information for many other years is available via the main page on ACH MLA sessions.

Corrections and additions are welcome; please send them to John.Lavagnino at kcl.ac.uk.


Summary of Sessions

Saturday, 27 December 2008

2:00–5:00 p.m.

3:30–4:45 p.m.

5:15–6:30 p.m.

7:00–8:15 p.m.

8:45–10:00 p.m.

Sunday, 28 December 2008

8:30–9:45 a.m.

10:15–11:30 a.m.

Noon–1:15 p.m.

1:45–3:00 p.m.

3:30–4:45 p.m.

7:15–8:30 p.m.

Monday, 29 December 2008

8:30–9:45 a.m.

10:15–11:30 a.m.

Noon–1:15 p.m.

1:45–3:00 p.m.

3:30–4:45 p.m.

7:15–8:30 p.m.

9:00–10:15 p.m.

Tuesday, 30 December 2008

Noon–1:15 p.m.


1: Evaluating Digital Work for Tenure and Promotion: A Workshop for Evaluators and Candidates

Saturday, 27 December 2008, 2:00–5:00 p.m., Powell, Hilton San Francisco.

Program sponsored by the MLA Ad Hoc Committee on the Structure of the Annual Convention in conjunction with the MLA Committee on Information Technology

Presiding: Robert James Blake, University of California, Davis; Raymond G. Siemens, University of Victoria

Do you know how to assess effectively digital work for promotion and tenure? Do you know how to prepare your dossier so that your digital work can be effectively assessed? This three-hour workshop will offer discussion of case studies (including CVs, digital projects, and supporting materials) and identification of effective evaluation strategies and guidelines. The workshop will be limited to thirty participants so that there will be ample time for facilitated discussion. Our facilitators have extensive experience in the evaluation of digital literary scholarship and of work in computer-assisted language learning.

Preregistration is required.


23: Staging Postmodernity: Embodiment

Saturday, 27 December 2008, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Union Square 15, Hilton San Francisco.

Program arranged by the American Theatre and Drama Society

Presiding: Elizabeth Reitz Mullenix, Miami University, Oxford

  • “Krista Wong: Remodeling Legacies,” Cassidy C. Browning, University of Illinois, Urbana
  • “The Reptilian Brain and the Legacy of Modernism in Performances by Survival Research Laboratories,” Stephen Di Benedetto, University of Miami
  • “Jody McAuliffe’s Mao II, post DeLillo,” Sean Aaron Metzger, Duke University
  • “From the Avant-Garde to the Avatar: Modernism, Digital Technology, and the Rise of the Virtual Body,” Sarah T. Bay-Cheng, University at Buffalo, State University of New York

29: Pastiche in Postmodern Business Communication Pedagogy: History, Service Learning, and Technology

Saturday, 27 December 2008, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Union Square 16, Hilton San Francisco.

Program arranged by the Association for Business Communication

Presiding: Katherine V. Wills, Indiana University, Columbus

  • “Historical Narrative and Business Discourse: Writing and Rewriting the Starbucks Story,” Daphne A. Jameson, Cornell University
  • “It’s Easier Online! Distance-Learning Pitfalls with Asynchronous Instruction in Business Writing Courses,” Mahli Xuan Mechenbier, Kent State University, Kent
  • “Community Service, Service Learning: Writing the Future of Business Communication,” Mary Godwin, Purdue University, West Lafayette

52: Defoe, James, and Beerbohm: Computer-Assisted Criticism of Three Authors

Saturday, 27 December 2008, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Union Square 15, Hilton San Francisco.

Program arranged by the Association for Computers and the Humanities

Presiding: Mark Algee-Hewitt, New York University

  • “The Complete Semantic Web of Robinson Crusoe, 1719,” Martin Joel Gliserman, Rutgers University, New Brunswick
  • “Style Evolution in Henry James: Fiction, Short Fiction, Nonfiction, Drama,” David L. Hoover, New York University
  • “A Computational Approach to Style in Max Beerbohm’s Zuleika Dobson and Seven Men,” Donald E. Hardy, University of Nevada, Reno

For copies of abstracts, visit www.ach.org/mla/mla08/.

62: The Internet Dialogue between Eastern Europe and the United States

Saturday, 27 December 2008, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Nob Hill D, San Francisco Marriott.

Program arranged by the Romanian Studies Association of America

Presiding: Maria-Sabina Draga Alexandru, University of Bucharest

  • “From English Influence to English Epidemics: (Reflections on) The Romanian Language before and after 1989,” Domnita Dumitrescu, California State University, Los Angeles
  • “Identity as Hypertext in Romanian American Internet Culture,” Maria-Sabina Draga Alexandru
  • “‘I Blog. Do You?’: A Case Study of a Pedagogic Popular Culture,” Cosana Eram, Stanford University
  • “Translating Romanian Poetry into the American Online Space,” Gene Tanta, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

Respondent: Letitia Ileana Guran, University of Richmond

For copies of abstracts, write to msdalexuk at yahoo.co.uk.

70: Beyond the Classroom: Research into Knowledge Making

Saturday, 27 December 2008, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Union Square 22, Hilton San Francisco.

Program arranged by the Association of Teachers of Technical Writing

Presiding: David Dayton, Towson University

  • “Using a Hybrid Analytical Framework to Explore the Influence of Culture, Rhetoric, and the Technical Communicator on Technology Diffusion across Cultures,” Grace Coggio, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
  • “Impact of Screen-Capture Software and Instructional Videos on Student Revision and Student Attitudes,” Mary Lourdes Silva, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • “The Prospects and Challenges of Web 2.0 Technologies for Qualitative Research,” David Dayton

92: What Is a Scholarly Journal? Identity Issues in Our Digital Age

Saturday, 27 December 2008, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Golden Gate 6, Hilton San Francisco.

Program arranged by the Council of Editors of Learned Journals

“What Is a Scholarly Journal? Identity Issues in Our Digital Age,” James O’Donnell, Georgetown University

Respondent: Ann Okerson, Yale University

The CELJ awards will be presented.


100: Reconceiving Poetics

Saturday, 27 December 2008, 7:00–8:15 p.m., Golden Gate 6, Hilton San Francisco.

Program arranged by the Division on Poetry

Presiding: Michael Davidson, University of California, San Diego

  • “Cultural Logics and Innovative Poetics,” Barrett Watten, Wayne State University
  • “Mobile Media Poetics,” Rita Raley, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • “Turning a Deaf Eye on Poetry: Sign Language and the Poetics of the Moving Image,” H-Dirksen Bauman, Gallaudet University

106: Editing Orally Based Texts in a Digital Age

Saturday, 27 December 2008, 7:00–8:15 p.m., Powell, Hilton San Francisco.

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Scholarly Editions

Presiding: John D. Niles, University of Wisconsin, Madison

  • “Pathways and eEditions,” John Miles Foley, University of Missouri, Columbia
  • “‘James Cleland His Book’: A Hypertext Edition of One North Irish Family’s Collection of Cheap Books,” John Moulden, National University of Ireland, Galway
  • “How Oral Must an Oral Poem Be? The eEdition as Argument,” Daniel O’Donnell, University of Lethbridge

For copies of abstracts, write to jdniles at wisc.edu.

108: Using Technology to Teach Languages

Saturday, 27 December 2008, 7:00–8:15 p.m., Yerba Buena Salon 12, San Francisco Marriott.

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Information Technology

Presiding: Robert James Blake, University of California, Davis

  • “Reconceptualizing the Use of Language Labs in Hybrid Language Courses,” M. Rafael Salaberry, University of Texas, Austin
  • “The Use of E-Portfolios for L2 Assessment: Reflection and Evaluation,” Barbara Lafford, Arizona State University; Michelle Petersen, Arizona State University
  • “Turning Language Learners into Linguists? First Experiences of Learners with a New Corpus-Driven Language-Learning Tool,” Peter Wood, University of Waterloo
  • “Issues in Designing and Implementing Hybrid Course Models for Language Teaching,” Angelika Kraemer, Michigan State University

116: New Subjects in and beyond the Classroom

Saturday, 27 December 2008, 7:00–8:15 p.m., Golden Gate 1, Hilton San Francisco.

Program arranged by the MLA Executive Council

Presiding: Paula Rabinowitz, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities; Sidonie Smith, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

  • “The Sounds of the Classroom,” Geoffrey Sirc, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
  • “The Digital Humanities Turn,” Julie Klein, Wayne State University
  • “Performing Engagement: Working in Disability Culture Settings,” Petra Kuppers, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

119: Queer Uses of New Media

Saturday, 27 December 2008, 7:00–8:15 p.m., Golden Gate 3, Hilton San Francisco.

A special session.

Presiding: Mark McHarry, Petaluma, California

  • “Out of the Closets and into Cyberspace: Simulating the Gay Ghetto in the Internet Age,” Matt Bell, Bridgewater State University
  • “Yaoi and Slash Fiction: Woman Reading, Writing, and ‘Getting Off’?” Mark John Isola, Wentworth Institute of Technology
  • “In Sight, out of Focus: Marriage, the Union of Wu Tsang and Math Bass,” Katherine Brewer Ball, New York University

141: Technology: A Critical Examination

Saturday, 27 December 2008, 8:45–10:00 p.m., Foothill F, San Francisco Marriott.

Program arranged by the Division on the Teaching of Language

Presiding: Charlotte Ann Melin, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

  • “Pedagogical Implications of Blogging in Foreign Language Education,” Marcel P. Rotter, University of Mary Washington
  • “Teaching Digital Reading and Writing in the Composition Classroom,” Lori A. Emerson, University of Colorado, Boulder
  • “SMART Boards and Other Instructional Technologies: Promises and Pitfalls,” Kevin P. Trovini, Henry Ford Community University, Michigan

163: Scholarly Editing in the Twenty-First Century: Digital Media and Editing

Sunday, 28 December 2008, 8:30–10:15 a.m., Yosemite B, Hilton San Francisco.

A forum.

Presiding: Jerome J. McGann, University of Virginia

  • “The Critical Potential of Electronic Editions,” Hans Walter Gabler, Universität München
  • “If Shakespeare Had a Hard Drive: Our Born-Digital Literary Heritage,” Matthew Gary Kirschenbaum, University of Maryland, College Park
  • “Scholarly Editing without Walls,” Peter Robinson, University of Birmingham

For linked sessions, see meetings 549 and 617.

168: Psychoanalysis and Science Fiction

Sunday, 28 December 2008, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Golden Gate 8, Hilton San Francisco.

Program arranged by the Division on Psychological Approaches to Literature

Presiding: Ewa Plonowska Ziarek, University at Buffalo, State University of New York

  • “Reading Jurassic Park as the Revolt against the Feminine in the Age of High-Tech Globalization,” Robert Samuels, University of California, Los Angeles
  • “The Mismeasure of Desire: Freudian Negroes, Ravishing Simians, and Envy at the Limits of Civilization in Rouben Mamoulian’s Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde,” Zakiyyah Jackson, University of California, Berkeley
  • “Androids, Cyborgs, Good-Enough Mothers, and Good-Enough Analysts in Star Trek: The Next Generation,” Esther Rashkin, University of Utah

174: Microblogging: Producing Discourse in 140 Characters or Less

Sunday, 28 December 2008, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Golden Gate 6, Hilton San Francisco.

A special session.

Presiding: Brian L. Croxall, Emory University

  • “Textual Aggregators: Tweets, News Feeds, and Search,” John Jones, University of Texas, Austin
  • “TinySyntax: Twitter as Networked Space,” Matthew K. Gold, New York City University of Technology, City University of New York
  • “Political Microdiscourse: Deciding the Presidency in 140 Characters or Less,” David Parry, University of Texas, Dallas

For abstracts, references, and additional information, visit www.outsidethetext.com/microbloggingMLA.html.


202: The Way We Teach Now

Sunday, 28 December 2008, 10:15 a.m.–noon, Continental 5, Hilton San Francisco.

The Presidential Forum.

Presiding: Gerald Graff, University of Illinois, Chicago

  • “Theory as a Vocation,” Amanda S. Anderson, Johns Hopkins University
  • “Conventional Wisdom,” Michael Bérubé, Penn State University, University Park
  • “After Suspicion,” Rita Felski, University of Virginia
  • “Writing without Paper: Instant Global Distribution and the Future of Thought,” Richard E. Miller, Rutgers University, New Brunswick

For linked sessions, see meetings 320, 337, and 488.

223: MLA Bibliography Performance across Vendor Platforms

Sunday, 28 December 2008, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Golden Gate 5, Hilton San Francisco.

Program arranged by the MLA Advisory Committee on the MLA International Bibliography

Presiding: John B. Dillon, University of Wisconsin, Madison

  • “A Review of the Vendors,” Liorah A. Golomb, Wichita State University; Aline Soules, California State University, East Bay

224: Methodologies for Literary Studies in the Digital Age

Sunday, 28 December 2008, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Union Square 14, Hilton San Francisco.

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Information Technology

Presiding: Stephen Olsen, MLA

Speakers: Tanya Clement, University of Maryland, College Park; David L. Hoover, New York University; Alan Liu, University of California, Santa Barbara; Kenneth M. Price, University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Susan Schreibman, Royal Irish Academy

244: Technology and the Teaching of Linguistics

Sunday, 28 December 2008, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Nob Hill A, San Francisco Marriott.

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on General Linguistics

Presiding: Iulia Pittman, Auburn University, Auburn

  • “Successful Technologies for Teaching Phonetics,” Iulia Pittman
  • “Technology and Learner-Centered Pedagogy in the Teaching of Linguistics,” Marnie Jo Petray, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo
  • “Teaching Online Courses in Linguistics,” Rebecca Day Babcock, University of Texas, Permian Basin

Respondent: Rebecca Day Babcock


251: The University Press as Cyberinfrastructure: A Roundtable

Sunday, 28 December 2008, noon–1:15 p.m., Lombard, Hilton San Francisco.

Program arranged by the Division on Methods of Literary Research

Presiding: Laura C. Mandell, Miami University, Oxford

Speakers: Linda Bree, Cambridge University Press; Daphne Ireland, Princeton University Press; Penny Kaiserling, University of Virginia Press; Michael Lonegro, Johns Hopkins University Press

271: Genre, Form, and Cultural Practice in Contemporary Electronic Literature

Sunday, 28 December 2008, noon–1:15 p.m., Golden Gate 6, Hilton San Francisco.

A special session.

Presiding: Jay David Bolter, Georgia Institute of Technology

  • “Born Digital: Writing Poetry in Digital Media,” Maria Engberg, Blekinge Institute of Technology
  • “Re: Lit,” Scott Rettberg, University of Bergen
  • “Against Electronic Literature,” Charles Alexander Baldwin, West Virginia University, Morgantown

Respondent: John Cayley, Brown University


301: Drama/Performance and the Scene of Translation: The Pragmatics and Poetics of Translation in Print, on Stage, in Cyberspace

Sunday, 28 December 2008, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Sierra Suite F, San Francisco Marriott.

Program arranged by the Division on Drama

Presiding: Claire Sponsler, University of Iowa

  • “Translation and the Readable-Playable Text,” J. Ellen Gainor, Cornell University; Gregary Joseph Racz, Long Island University, Brooklyn
  • “Negotiating the Foreign: Language, American Audiences, and Performing Arts from Japan,” Barbara Thornbury, Temple University
  • “Cybertranslations: Caribbean Performance and the Electronic Reencoding of Prometheus Bound,” Leo F. Cabranes-Grant, University of California, Santa Barbara

320: Biocultures: Closing the Science-Humanities Gap

Sunday, 28 December 2008, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Continental 5, Hilton San Francisco.

A linked session arranged in conjunction with the Presidential Forum The Way We Teach Now (202)

Presiding: Gerald Graff, University of Illinois, Chicago

  • “The Biocultural Unconscious: Literary Studies as Symptom in the Pedagogical Space,” Lennard J. Davis, University of Illinois, Chicago
  • “The Bats and the Bees: Science, Culture, Sex,” Judith Halberstam, University of Southern California
  • “Blood and Stories: Cultures in the Classroom,” Priscilla B. Wald, Duke University

335: Romance and Hypertext

Sunday, 28 December 2008, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Foothill G1, San Francisco Marriott.

Program arranged by the International Courtly Literature Society

Presiding: Daniel E. O’Sullivan, University of Mississippi

  • “Seeing and Hearing Language with Hypertext: Sir Gawain and the Green Knight,” Carol L. Robinson, Kent State University, Trumbull
  • “‘Of ani mervailes that ther were’: The Genre of Romance, Storyspace, and Michael Joyce’s Afternoon, a Story,” Alison T. Walker, University of California, Los Angeles

343: Pirandellian Moods: Mechanized and Mediated

Sunday, 28 December 2008, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Pacific Suite F, San Francisco Marriott.

Program arranged by the Pirandello Society of America

Presiding: Susan Tenneriello, Baruch University, City University of New York

  • “Serafino Gubbio’s Sick Eye,” Davide Bolognesi, Columbia University
  • “Long Live the Machine That Mechanizes Life!” Mihaela Martinescu, University of California, Los Angeles
  • “Pirandellian Spectors in Contemporary Practice: Interactive Media and Performance,” Susan Tenneriello

Respondent: Jana O’Keefe Bazzoni, Baruch University, City University of New York

For copies of abstracts, visit pirandellosocietyofamerica.org.

356: Digital NDNs: Pedagogies for American Indian Writing and Literature in the Twenty-First Century

Sunday, 28 December 2008, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Sutter, Hilton San Francisco.

Program arranged by the Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures

Presiding: Malea D. Powell, Michigan State University

  • “Digitizing Silko’s Ceremony: Helping Twenty-First-Century Students Understand American Indian Literature,” Rick Mott, Eastern Kentucky University
  • “Expand and Contract: E-Learning Shapes the World of American Indian Literature in Cyprus and California,” Nancy Strow Sheley, California State University, Long Beach; Carol Zitzer-Comfort, California State University, Long Beach
  • “Mapping Native Space,” Lisa Brooks, Harvard University

363: Comparative Literature and Media Studies: Convergence or Opposition?

Sunday, 28 December 2008, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Yerba Buena Salon 15, San Francisco Marriott.

Program arranged by the American Comparative Literature Association

Presiding: C. P. Haun Saussy, Yale University

  • “Remediation Yes, Media Studies No,” Jeffrey D. Wallen, Hampshire University
  • “New Media Critical Homologies,” Brian Lennon, Penn State University, University Park
  • “Reading and Writing 419: Digital Media and the Geopolitics of Multiauthorial Narrative,” Paul Benzon, Rutgers University, New Brunswick
  • “Narrative Convergence and the New Medial Ecology,” Marc Ruppel, University of Maryland, College Park

369: Promoting the Useful Arts: Copyright, Fair Use, and the Digital Scholar

Sunday, 28 December 2008, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Foothill E, San Francisco Marriott.

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Computer Studies in Language and Literature

Presiding: Stephen J. Ramsay, University of Nebraska, Lincoln

Speakers: Aileen Berg, John Wiley and Sons; Kari M. Kraus, University of Maryland, College Park; Amitabh Rai, Florida State University; Robin G. Schulze, Penn State University, University Park


405: Multimodal Literacies: A Pedagogical Imperative?

Sunday, 28 December 2008, 7:15–8:30 p.m., Continental 1–2, Hilton San Francisco.

Program arranged by the Division on the Teaching of Writing

Presiding: Mary R. Boland, California State University, San Bernardino

  • “When the Essay Is the Gloss: Teasing Out the Intrinsic Writer through the Use of New Media,” Ethna D. Lay, Hofstra University
  • “Comp 2.0: Postdisciplinarity in a Web 2.0 World,” Ann Jurecic, Rutgers University, New Brunswick
  • “Writing on the World: The Teaching of Composition in an Era of Social Computing,” Jay David Bolter, Georgia Institute of Technology

For copies of abstracts, write to mboland at csusb.edu.

419: Between “Home” and “Host”: Iranian Diaspora Literature and Its Many Modes of Representation

Sunday, 28 December 2008, 7:15–8:30 p.m., Yerba Buena Salon 4, San Francisco Marriott.

A special session.

Presiding: Persis M. Karim, San José State University

  • “Toward a Theory of Iranian American Life Writing,” Amy Motlagh, Princeton University
  • “World Wide Weave: Digital Iranian Diaspora and the Question of Identity,” Babak Elahi, Rochester Institute of Technology
  • “The Contrapuntal Aesthetic of Marjane Satrapi,” Jasmin Darznik, California University of the Arts
  • “Pilgrimage for Oneself: Conflictual Filiation and Affiliation in Azadeh Moaveni’s Lipstick Jihad,” Amena Moinfar, University of Texas, Austin

Respondent: Nasrin Rahimieh, University of California, Irvine

For copies of abstracts, visit www.persiskarim.com.

421: Digital Immigrants Teaching Digital Natives

Sunday, 28 December 2008, 7:15–8:30 p.m., Golden Gate 5, Hilton San Francisco.

Program arranged by the Office of the Executive Director

Presiding: Gerhard J. Joseph, Lehman University, City University of New York; George L. Levine, Rutgers University, New Brunswick

  • “Pawning the Faerie Queene; or, Literature in the Age of Online Games and Social Networking,” Jay Clayton, Vanderbilt University
  • “Blessed Media: Living and Learning with Videoblogs and Game-Based Environments,” Timothy Lenoir, Duke University
  • “Teaching for the Time of No Time,” Mark W. Edmundson, University of Virginia

424A: Globalization, Language Use, and Community

Sunday, 28 December 2008, 7:15–8:30 p.m., Yerba Buena Salon 10, San Francisco Marriott.

Program arranged by the Division on Language and Society

Presiding: Andrea Abernethy Lunsford, Stanford University

  • “Missing Narrative Pieces: Middles and Ends of International Social Entrepreneurship,” Shirley Brice Heath, Stanford University
  • “Feeling Poor While Feeling Rich: The Rhetoric of Internet Microloans,” Shameem Black, Yale University
  • “Indigenous Languages, Nation Building, and the Global Market in the New South Africa,” Molly Abel Travis, Tulane University

434: Investigating Language Change: Corpora and Databases

Monday, 29 December 2008, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Yerba Buena Salon 4, San Francisco Marriott.

Program arranged by the Division on Language Change

Presiding: David West Brown, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

  • “Tracing Linguistic Change with the Software Suite ling.surf: Examples from the Bank of Canadian English,” Stefan Dollinger, University of British Columbia
  • “The Power of the Database to Address Noun Class Uniformity in Old High German,” Tyler Luiten, University of Wisconsin, Madison
  • “Developments in the Competition between Derivational Patterns in English,” Mark Kaunisto, University of Tampere

437: YouTube and the Canon

Monday, 29 December 2008, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Continental 1–2, Hilton San Francisco.

Program arranged by the Division on Literature and Other Arts

Presiding: Marc A. Weiner, Indiana University, Bloomington

  • “Paratextual Submission: Wian Treetin, All My Churun, YouTube,” Nicholas Sammond, University of Toronto
  • YouTube and Figure Theater,” Simone Seym, American University

445: Anonymity

Monday, 29 December 2008, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Continental 3, Hilton San Francisco.

Program arranged by the Society for Critical Exchange

Presiding: Jeffrey R. Di Leo, University of Houston, Victoria

  • “Anonymity and the Public Sphere,” Robert J. Griffin, Texas A&M University, College Station
  • “Laboring in Anonymity,” Sharon O’Dair, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa
  • “Anxiety and Authority: Anonymity and Pseudonymity in Electronic Academic Environments,” Matthew S. S. Johnson, Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville
  • “A More Personal Anonymity: Online Teaching in Second Life,” Henry James Morello, Penn State University, University Park
  • “Cultures of Anonymity: A Response,” Christian Moraru, University of North Carolina, Greensboro

For copies of papers, visit societyforcriticalexchange.org.

464: Online Course Management: Friend or Foe?

Monday, 29 December 2008, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Yosemite A, Hilton San Francisco.

A special session.

Presiding: Julie McFadden, Carleton University

  • “Meeting the Enemy without Giving Up the Ship: Literature Courses and the Collaborative Friendship with Learner-Centered Online Courses,” Patricia Campbell, Lake-Sumter Community University, Florida
  • “Learning 24/7 Teaching to Teach 24/7 Learning: Training to Maximize Online Learning,” Leni Marshall, University of Wisconsin, Stout
  • “The Body in the Classroom: Information Literacy, Teaching, and the Connected Classroom,” Kathleen Margaret Lant, California State University, East Bay

For copies of abstracts, write to julie.mcfadden at tmconsulting.com.

465: Net.art and Electronic Literature

Monday, 29 December 2008, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Yerba Buena Salon 6, San Francisco Marriott.

Program arranged by the Division on Twentieth-Century Spanish Literature

Presiding: María T. Zubiaurre, University of California, Los Angeles

  • “Bloqueo digital: Perversidad de las autobiografías publicoprivadas,” Enric Bou, Brown University
  • “Border Disturbance Art: From Network Gestures to Nano-poetics,” Amy Sara Carroll, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; Ricardo Domínguez, University of California, San Diego
  • “Digital Secretions: Naief Yehya and the Pornography of Cybernetics,” Susan Jennifer Antebi, University of California, Riverside
  • “Domestic Violence and Net.art: The Hispanic Screen,” María T. Zubiaurre

468: Humanities 2.0: Participatory Learning in an Age of Technology

Monday, 29 December 2008, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Golden Gate 5, Hilton San Francisco.

Program arranged by the MLA Executive Council

Presiding: Zita Nunes, University of Maryland, College Park

Speakers: Cathy N. Davidson, Duke University; Greg Niemeyer, University of California, Berkeley; Todd Samuel Presner, University of California, Los Angeles; Howard Rheingold, Stanford University


484: Stereotypes of Contingent Faculty Members: Humor and Social Commentary

Monday, 29 December 2008, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Union Square 15, Hilton San Francisco.

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Part-Time Faculty Members

Presiding: Lila Marz Harper, Central Washington University

  • “Contingency, Irony, Squalidarity,” Erik Chandler, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
  • “Stereotypical Representations of Faculty Members in the Academic Novel: How Race and Gender Trump Class in the Popular Imagination,” Robert Samuels, University of California, Los Angeles
  • “Web 2.0 and the Adjunct: Breaking Stereotypes in the Blogosphere,” Monica F. Jacobe, Catholic University of America
  • “Social Media and Social Reality,” P. Marc Bousquet, Santa Clara University

For copies of abstracts, write to harperl at cwu.edu.

497: Digital Initiatives in Early Modern English Literature

Monday, 29 December 2008, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Golden Gate 6, Hilton San Francisco.

Program arranged by the Association for Computers and the Humanities

Presiding: John Lavagnino, King’s College London

  • “‘What Is Writ by Hand We Reverence More’: Early Modern Manuscripts in the Digital Age,” Grace J. Ioppolo, University of Reading
  • “Toward the Catalogue of English Literary Manuscripts,” John Lavagnino
  • “The Notion of the Knowledgebase in Editing and Understanding,” Raymond G. Siemens, University of Victoria

501: Editing Where You Least Expect It: Cultural Studies

Monday, 29 December 2008, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Continental 1–2, Hilton San Francisco.

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Scholarly Editions

Presiding: Bruce R. Smith, University of Southern California

  • “Shakespeare Performance in Asia: Intercultural Video Archives as Editorial Hyper- or Paratext,” Peter S. Donaldson, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • “Speech and Memory, Text and History: Transcribing the Crispus Attucks Commemorative Events,” James Greene, West Virginia University, Morgantown
  • “Queer Timing in Contemporary Queer Art,” Judith Halberstam, University of Southern California

514: Second Lives: Reading and Writing Virtual Worlds

Monday, 29 December 2008, noon–1:15 p.m., Sutter, Hilton San Francisco.

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Media and Literature

Presiding: Matthew Gary Kirschenbaum, University of Maryland, College Park

  • “Contract or Charter? The End-User License Agreement and the Textual Warranting of Virtual Worlds,” Alenda Chang, University of California, Berkeley
  • “Performative Play: Revising the Politics of Virtual Worlds,” Tanner Higgin, University of California, Riverside
  • “Virtual Strikes,” Rita Raley, University of California, Santa Barbara

520: Roundtable on Electronic Editions and Archives of Poetry

Monday, 29 December 2008, noon–1:15 p.m., Continental 1–2, Hilton San Francisco.

Program arranged by the Division on Poetry

Presiding: Cristanne Miller, University at Buffalo, State University of New York

Speakers: Michael S. Hennessey, University of Pennsylvania; Joseph Foster Loewenstein, Washington University; Jerome J. McGann, University of Virginia; David Radcliffe, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; William Shaw, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Martha Nell Smith, University of Maryland, College Park

This session is arranged in conjunction with session 692.

530: Teaching Literature in the Twenty-First Century

Monday, 29 December 2008, noon–1:15 p.m., Union Square 15, Hilton San Francisco.

Program arranged by the National Council of Teachers of English

Presiding: Carol Winkelmann, Xavier University, Ohio

  • “The Shifting Scenes of Feminist Pedagogy,” Carolyn Johnson Allen, University of Washington, Seattle
  • “Religion in and out of the Classroom,” Carol Winkelmann
  • “Pedagogy Online: Blackboard and the Rhetoric of Critical Consciousness,” Alexander McEllistrem Evenson, University of North Dakota
  • “Teaching Worldliness: Relocating the Literary Context in the Twenty-First Century,” Ammar Naji, University of North Dakota

538: The Josephine A. Roberts Forum: Digital Technology and Manuscript Study

Monday, 29 December 2008, noon–1:15 p.m., Golden Gate 6, Hilton San Francisco.

Program arranged by the Renaissance English Text Society

Presiding: Arthur F. Marotti, Wayne State University; Steven William May, Emory University

  • “Variants, Visualization, and Analysis in the Devonshire MS (British Library Add. MS. 17492),” Caroline Leitch, University of Victoria; Raymond G. Siemens, University of Victoria
  • “Digital Challenges Confronting Manuscript Studies in the Twenty-First Century,” David Lee Gants, Florida State University

Respondent: Alan Nelson, University of California, Berkeley

543: The Library of Google: Researching Scanned Books

Monday, 29 December 2008, noon–1:15 p.m., Van Ness, Hilton San Francisco.

A special session.

Presiding: Michael Hancher, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

  • “From Horse and Buggy to Hovercraft: My Research before and after Google Book Search,” Amanda L. French, Emory University
  • “Dissertation 2.0: Remixing a Dissertation on American Literature as Work of Digital Scholarship Using Google Books,” Lisa Spiro, Rice University
  • “When Is a Book Not a Book? Using Google Book Search,” Eleanor F. Shevlin, West Chester University

For detailed session proposals, visit mh.cla.umn.edu/MLA_SHARP.pdf.

549: Our Affection for Books

Monday, 29 December 2008, noon–1:15 p.m., Yosemite B, Hilton San Francisco.

A linked session arranged in conjunction with the forum Scholarly Editing in the Twenty-First Century: Digital Media and Editing (163)

Presiding: Susan J. Wolfson, Princeton University

  • “Editing (and Redeeming) Robert Southey,” Lynda Pratt, University of Nottingham
  • “Different Demands, Different Priorities,” Stuart Curran, University of Pennsylvania
  • “Editing and the Errors of Our Ways,” Christopher Ricks, Boston University

For brief previews, see Wolfson’s Web page at Princeton University (english.princeton.edu).


562: Teaching Popular Media; or, Theorizing Our Students’ Pleasure

Monday, 29 December 2008, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Yosemite B, Hilton San Francisco.

A special session.

Presiding: Cynthia Fuchs, George Mason University

  • “Channeling Cinéphilia: Introductory Film Studies Pedagogy and the Digital Video Revolution,” Paul D. Young, Vanderbilt University
  • “Teaching the Taboo: Television’s (Trashy) Golden Age,” Jennifer Wicke, University of Virginia
  • “Ballad of a Bald Man: Teaching When You Know There’s Something Happening and You Don’t Know What It Is,” Kevin J. H. Dettmar, Pomona University

566: Engaging the Senses in Colonial Latin American Literature

Monday, 29 December 2008, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Yerba Buena Salon 12, San Francisco Marriott.

Program arranged by the Division on Colonial Latin American Literatures

Presiding: Cynthia L. Stone, University of the Holy Cross

  • “Learning to Be an Amoxpouhque in a Mexican Literature Course,” Monica Diaz, University of Texas–Pan American
  • “3-D Goes Colonial: Bringing the Mesoamerican Codex to Second Life,” Armanda Lewis, Columbia University
  • “Teaching Spanish American Colonial Literature in the Digital Era,” Domingo Ledezma, Wheaton University, Massachusetts

592: The Good Web: A Workshop in Teaching Your Students How to Evaluate Web Resources

Monday, 29 December 2008, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Continental 1–2, Hilton San Francisco.

Program sponsored by the MLA Ad Hoc Committee on the Structure of the Annual Convention in conjunction with the MLA Committee on Information Technology

Presiding: Matthew Jockers, Stanford University; Susan Schreibman, Royal Irish Academy

Our students will be lifelong users of the Internet. This workshop will introduce participants to methods and strategies to teach students how to be more savvy Web users, from how to evaluate sites and sources to how to find information in the deep Web. For additional information and to preview materials, visit www.mla.org/web_wkshp.

594: Editing Spaces in the Known and Unknown Worlds

Monday, 29 December 2008, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Franciscan A, Hilton San Francisco.

Program arranged by the Society for Textual Scholarship

Presiding: Marta L. Werner, D’Youville University

  • “Civil War Washington: Studies in Transformation,” Kenneth M. Price, University of Nebraska, Lincoln
  • “The Architecture and Architexture of Editing Texts and Objects,” Beth Staley, West Virginia University, Morgantown
  • “The Space of the Page in Early Modern England,” Mark Bland, De Montfort University

599: Editorial Futures

Monday, 29 December 2008, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Sutter, Hilton San Francisco.

Program arranged by the Division on Methods of Literary Research

Presiding: Robin G. Schulze, Penn State University, University Park

  • “Selling the Editorial Future? The Threats of Commercial Full Text,” Maura Carey Ives, Texas A&M University, College Station
  • “Digitally Yours; or, Dwelling in the Possibilities of Dynamic Editing,” Martha Nell Smith, University of Maryland, College Park
  • “The Digital End of the Scholarly Edition,” Andrew M. Stauffer, Boston University

614: Technology and Composition: Implications for the Profession

Monday, 29 December 2008, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Golden Gate 5, Hilton San Francisco.

Program arranged by the Division on the Teaching of Writing

Presiding: Donna Strickland, University of Missouri, Columbia

  • “An Illegitimate Profession: How Composition Bastardizes New Media Scholarship,” Jonathan Alexander, University of California, Irvine; Jacqueline R. Rhodes, California State University, San Bernardino
  • “You Have a Citation Request. Please Confirm,” Collin Gifford Brooke, Syracuse University
  • “A Tasteful but Amateur Profession for One Sought Future,” Anne Frances Wysocki, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

617: Editing Manuscripts in Digital and Print Forms

Monday, 29 December 2008, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Yosemite B, Hilton San Francisco.

A linked session arranged in conjunction with the forum Scholarly Editing in the Twenty-First Century: Digital Media and Editing (163)

Presiding: Arthur F. Marotti, Wayne State University

  • “All of the Above: The Importance of Multiple Editions of Manuscripts,” Steven William May, Emory University
  • “Editing Early Modern Women’s Manuscripts: The Accidental Copy Texts,” Margaret J. M. Ezell, Texas A&M University, College Station
  • “Different Strokes, Same Folk,” Daniel O’Donnell, University of Lethbridge

618: Roundtable: What Is a Scholarly Journal? Identity Issues in Our Digital Age

Monday, 29 December 2008, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Union Square 14, Hilton San Francisco.

Program arranged by the Council of Editors of Learned Journals

Presiding: Robert Lowry Patten, Rice University

Speakers: Elizabeth Brown, Johns Hopkins University; Martha J. Cutter, University of Connecticut, Storrs; Sheri Spaine Long, University of Alabama, Birmingham; Alan Rauch, University of North Carolina, Charlotte; Steven Tötösy de Zepetnek, Northeastern University

635: Art and Second Life

Monday, 29 December 2008, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Continental 1–2, Hilton San Francisco.

Program arranged by the Division on Literature and Other Arts

Presiding: Marc A. Weiner, Indiana University, Bloomington

  • “Shakespeare and the Meaning of Second Life,” Linda A. Charnes, Indiana University, Bloomington
  • “Intermediality and Dialogic Arts in Second Life,” Amy J. Elias, University of Tennessee, Knoxville

673: Expanded Cinema Today

Monday, 29 December 2008, 7:15–8:30 p.m., Lombard, Hilton San Francisco.

Program arranged by the Division on Film

Presiding: Anna Everett, University of California, Santa Barbara; Alice Ann Kuzniar, University of Waterloo

  • “Film beyond Film: American Splendor and the New Narrative Possibilities of DVD,” Samuel Amago, University of Notre Dame
  • “The Theatrical Jukebox: Networked Film Publics and Online Film Distribution,” Charles E. Tryon, Fayetteville State University
  • “Web 2.0 and the Expansion of the Filmic Event,” Jeremy Justus, West Virginia University, Morgantown
  • “Imploded Cinema,” Richard Langston, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

692: Electronic Roundtable: A Demonstration of Digital Poetry Archives

Monday, 29 December 2008, 7:15–8:30 p.m., Continental 1–2, Hilton San Francisco.

Program arranged by the MLA Office of Research

  • The Poetess Archive Database and Visualization Tool (unixgen.muohio.edu/~poetess/),” Zach Weir, Miami University, Oxford
  • The Dickinson Electronic Archives and Emily Dickinson’s Correspondence: A Born-Digital Inquiry (www.emilydickinson.org/),” Ellen Louise Hart, Portland State University; Alexandra Socarides, University of Missouri, Columbia
  • The Walt Whitman Archive: Editing, Argument, and New Interpretative Possibilities (www.whitmanarchive.org/),” Elizabeth Lorang, University of Nebraska, Lincoln
  • The William Blake Archive (www.blakearchive.org/),” Ashley Reed, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • PennSound: All the Free Poetry You Care to Download (writing.upenn.edu/pennsound/),” Michael S. Hennessey, University of Pennsylvania
  • “Editing with Links: English Poetry 1579–1830 (englishpoetry.org/),” David Radcliffe, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
  • The Electronic Poetry Center (home.jps.net/~nada/glazier.htm),” Lori A. Emerson, University of Colorado, Boulder

This session is arranged in conjunction with session 520. It allows attendees to use scholarly applications of digital poetry archives. Presenters will exhibit their archives simultaneously, creating opportunities for small-group discussion and demonstration.

694: The Internet and Public Intellectuals in the Postcommunist World

Monday, 29 December 2008, 7:15–8:30 p.m., Foothill F, San Francisco Marriott.

Program arranged by the Division on Slavic and East European Literatures

Presiding: Vitaly Chernetsky, Miami University, Oxford

  • “The Russian Cyberliterati: Postmodern and Transmodern Culture and Poetics,” Jefri Knazan, McGill University
  • “Russian-Speaking LiveJournal: Finding Your Kin,” Mariya Dmytriyeva, California State University, Northridge
  • “Postcolonial and Postmodern in Virtual Space: A Ukrainian Case,” Volodymyr Chumachenko, University of Illinois, Urbana
  • “Contemporary Balkan Literatures in the Information Era: Financing the Literary Market, the Internet, and the New Spirit of Intellectual Collaboration,” Sonya Petkova, Columbia University

695: Literary Experimentalism in East Asia

Monday, 29 December 2008, 7:15–8:30 p.m., Nob Hill D, San Francisco Marriott.

Program arranged by the Division on East Asian Languages and Literatures after 1900

Presiding: Walter K. Lew, University of Miami

  • “Digital Complex: Redefinition of Literary Sensibility in Japan,” Koichi Haga, Josai International University
  • “Writing Machine Collectives: Digital Poetry in Hong Kong and Taiwan,” Karen An-hwei Lee, Santa Ana, California
  • “Negotiating between Languages: The Poet Kim Su-yông’s Resistance to Monolingualism in Postcolonial South Korea,” Serk Bae Suh, University of California, Irvine

700: New Media in the World / What in the World Is New Media?

Monday, 29 December 2008, 9:00–10:15 p.m., Sutter, Hilton San Francisco.

Program arranged by the Division on Literature and Science

Presiding: Henry S. Turner, Rutgers University, New Brunswick

Speakers: Kimberly M. De Vries, California State University, Stanislaus; Richard A. Grusin, Wayne State University; Richard E. Miller, Rutgers University, New Brunswick; Joseph Paul Tabbi, University of Illinois, Chicago

710: Creative Writing in the Twenty-First Century

Monday, 29 December 2008, 9:00–10:15 p.m., Golden Gate 5, Hilton San Francisco.

A special session.

Presiding: Kelly Allison Ritter, University of North Carolina, Greensboro

  • “One Simple Word: From Creative Writing to Creative Writing Studies,” Tim Mayers, Millersville University
  • “Working with the Workshop: A Twenty-First-Century Genre,” Anna M. Leahy, Chapman University
  • “Toward a Technology of ‘Creative Writing,’” Peter J. Vandenberg, DePaul University

724: E-Criticism: New Critical Methods and Modalities

Monday, 29 December 2008, 9:00–10:15 p.m., Continental 1–2, Hilton San Francisco.

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Information Technology

  • “Civil War Washington: Studies in Transformation (cdrh.unl.edu/civilwardc),” Stacey Berry, University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Elizabeth Lorang, University of Nebraska, Lincoln
  • “The Poetries of Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven: A Digital Genetic Edition in the Versioning Machine,” Tanya Clement, University of Maryland, College Park
  • “Literary Macroanalysis: Methods and Practice,” Matthew Jockers, Stanford University
  • “Is There a Kindle in This Class? How Convergence Devices May Change Our Understanding of Reading and Our Practices of Teaching (higheredkindle.blogspot.com/),” Kathleen Margaret Lant, California State University, East Bay
  • “Changing the Face of the Scholarly Essay: Collex (nines.org/exhibits),” Laura C. Mandell, Miami University, Oxford
  • “When Authors Won’t Die: Reasserting Authorial Interpretation through Online Forums (web.me.com/thesophie/Site/2008_MLA_CONVENTION.html),” Jessica R. Matthews, George Mason University
  • “Visualizing the ‘Advice to the Ladies of London’: A Digital Humanities Approach to Early Modern Gender (www.uweb.ucsb.edu/~jcmurphy/advice/index.html),” Jessica C. Murphy, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • “From E-Crit to Critical Media: Literary Criticism Meets Physical Computing,” Marcel O’Gorman, University of Waterloo

Attendees will learn to use new computer models, paradigms, and tools for literary criticism. Presenters will provide concurrent demonstrations of their digital work, creating opportunities for discussion.


796: The Audiobook

Tuesday, 30 December 2008, noon–1:15 p.m., Franciscan A, Hilton San Francisco.

A special session.

Presiding: Matthew C. Rubery, University of Leeds

  • “Learning from Librivox,” Michael Hancher, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
  • “New Audiobooks and Old Ways of Reading,” Matthew C. Rubery
  • “Langston Hughes’s The Weary Blues (Verve, 1958): The Audiobook as Poetic Form,” Gabriele Hayden, Yale University

For copies of abstracts, visit www.personal.leeds.ac.uk/~engmr/MLA_The_Audiobook_2008.doc.

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