Conferences Modern Language Association Digital Humanities Sessions

Guide to Digital-Humanities Talks at the 2007 MLA Convention

 

Digital Humanities Sessions – MLA 2007

The Association for Computers and the Humanities has compiled this list of sessions with digital-humanities talks at the 2007 Modern Language Association Convention (in Chicago from December 27 through 30). Some of these sessions contain only one or two relevant talks, but this list includes the entire program for each session.

In most cases you must pay the convention-registration fee in order to attend these talks. But three sessions are free and open to the public: “Professionalization in a Digital Age”, “Scholarship in New Media”, and “Keywords for a Digital Profession”. MLA talks are published at the discretion of their authors; if you want to obtain the text of a talk you were unable to attend, the best method is to contact the author directly.

Although the 2007 convention is now in the past, this information will remain available, as a record of what went on. Similar information for many other years is available via the main page on ACH MLA sessions.

Corrections and additions are welcome; please send them to John.Lavagnino at kcl.ac.uk.


Summary of Sessions

Thursday, 27 December 2007

3:30–4:45 p.m.

5:15–6:30 p.m.

7:00–8:15 p.m.

8:45–10:00 p.m.

Friday, 28 December 2007

8:30–9:45 a.m.

10:15–11:30 a.m.

Noon–1:15 p.m.

1:45–3:00 or 3:30 p.m.

3:30–4:45 p.m.

7:15–8:30 p.m.

Saturday, 29 December 2007

8:30–9:45 a.m.

10:15–11:30 a.m.

Noon–1:15 p.m.

1:45–3:00 p.m.

3:30–4:45 p.m.

5:15–6:30 p.m.

7:15–8:30 p.m.

9:00–10:15 p.m.

Sunday, 30 December 2007

8:30–9:45 a.m.

10:15–11:30 a.m.

1:45–3:00 p.m.


13: Kafka Now: Kafka and Popular Culture

Thursday, 27 December 2007, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Parlor C, Sheraton Chicago.

Program arranged by the Kafka Society of America

Presiding: Judith L. Ryan, Harvard University

  • “Kafka 2.0: YouTube Metamorphoses,” Randy Laist, University of Connecticut, Storrs
  • “Their Take on Kafka Now: Recent Kafka Adaptations on the New York Stage,” Marie Luise Caputo-Mayr, Temple University
  • “Extraterrestrial Kafka,” Henry S. Sussman, University at Buffalo, State University of New York

21: The Challenge of a Million Books

Thursday, 27 December 2007, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Grand Suite 2, Hyatt Regency.

Program arranged by the Association for Computers and the Humanities

Presiding: Arno Bosse, University of Chicago

  • “Mining Eighteenth-Century Ontologies: Machine Learning and Knowledge Classification in the Encyclopédie,” Glenn H. Roe, University of Chicago; Robert Voyer, University of Chicago
  • “Mining Millions of Metaphors,” Brad Pasanek, University of Southern California; D. Sculley, Tufts University
  • “You Know It When You Feel It: Assisted Machine Learning and Patterns of Sentimentality,” Sara Steger, University of Georgia

66: Open Digital Communities

Thursday, 27 December 2007, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Columbus Hall G, Hyatt Regency.

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Information Technology

Presiding: Geoffrey Rockwell, McMaster University

  • “The Best of Both Worlds: Peer Review through NINES (Networked Infrastructure for Nineteenth-Century Electronic Scholarship) and Social Research with the Collex Tool,” Laura C. Mandell, Miami University, Oxford
  • “Developing and Sharing Language Materials in a Consortium Context,” Robert James Blake, University of California, Davis
  • “Cyberinfrastructure and Open Standards, Methods, and Communities,” John Merritt Unsworth, University of Illinois, Urbana

Respondent: David G. Nicholls, MLA

72: Performance and Technology: Techniques of Embodiment

Thursday, 27 December 2007, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Stetson B and C, Hyatt Regency.

Program arranged by the Division on Drama

Presiding: Elin Diamond, Rutgers University, New Brunswick

  • “‘As Right a Line His Heart I Have Hit’: Cambises’ Tragic Armatures,” Adam Rzepka, University of Chicago
  • “Working Hard to Get My Fill: The Desiring Body in Video Games,” Derek A. Burrill, University of California, Riverside
  • “On Gestic Technology: Brecht beyond Biomechanics,” Devin A. Fore, Princeton University

73: Corpus-Based Applied Linguistics Research

Thursday, 27 December 2007, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Ohio, Sheraton Chicago.

Program arranged by the Division on Applied Linguistics

  • “French and Spanish Synchronous Computer-Mediated Discourse: A Corpus-Driven Comparison of Native Speakers and Nonnative Speakers,” Lee B. Abraham, Villanova University; Lawrence Williams, University of North Texas
  • “Data-Driven Learning: Concordances and Collocations in the Acquisition of Spanish Phrasal Verbs,” Carmen Schlig, Georgia State University
  • “The Persuasive Power of Conditionals,” Ilona Vandergriff, San Francisco State University

79: Persuasive Games

Thursday, 27 December 2007, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Toronto, Hyatt Regency.

Program arranged by the Division on Literary Criticism

Presiding: Rita M. Raley, University of California, Santa Barbara

  • “Introduction to Procedural Rhetoric,” Ian Bogost, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • “War Games,” Rita M. Raley
  • “Guy Debord’s ‘Kriegspiel’: Nostalgic Algorithms in Late Modernity,” Alexander Galloway, New York University

98: Reconstructing Whitman: The Rhetoric of Recovery

Thursday, 27 December 2007, 7:00–8:15 p.m., Grand Suite 2, Hyatt Regency.

A special session.

Presiding: Jay Grossman, Northwestern University

  • “Nostalgia in Whitman’s Changing Civil War Rhetoric,” Cristanne Miller, University at Buffalo, State University of New York
  • “Whitman, Sexual Democracy, and ‘The U.S.A. School of Writing,’” Vivian R. Pollak, Washington University
  • “Reconstructing Whitman’s Poetry Manuscripts,” Kenneth M. Price, University of Nebraska, Lincoln

102: Class, Inequality, and the Digital

Thursday, 27 December 2007, 7:00–8:15 p.m., Michigan B, Sheraton Chicago.

A special session.

Presiding: Robert A. Wilkie, University at Albany, State University of New York

  • “(I’m)Material Labor in the Digital Age,” Steven Wexler, Rollins University
  • “High-Tech Learning and the Minority Urban Youngster: The New Price Barrier to Literacy,” Reginald Martin, University of Memphis
  • “The Body Digital and (Immaterial) Feminism,” Jennifer M. Cotter, University of California, Los Angeles

105: Cosmofeminisms

Thursday, 27 December 2007, 7:00–8:15 p.m., Water Tower, Hyatt Regency.

A special session.

Presiding: Jennifer Williams, Michigan State University

  • “Cosmofeminist Sentiments: Feeling at a Distance through Global Media,” Shameem Black, Yale University
  • “‘Between Laughter and Tears’: The Difficulty of Black Cosmopolitanism in Zora Neale Hurston’s Mules and Men and Tell My Horse,” Eve E. Dunbar, Vassar University
  • “Motherless Girls: Melancholy Cosmopolitanism in Andrea Lee’s Sarah Phillips and Jamaica Kincaid’s Lucy,” Jennifer Williams
  • “Reading and Writing the Lives of Black Women Tourists: Contemporary Voices from United States Afro-America and the Caribbean,” Ifeoma C. K. Nwankwo, Vanderbilt University

For copies of abstracts, write to will1881@msu.edu.

120: Teaching in Changing Technological Environments

Thursday, 27 December 2007, 7:00–8:15 p.m., New Orleans, Hyatt Regency.

Program arranged by the Division on Teaching as a Profession

Presiding: Sheila T. Cavanagh, Emory University

  • “Changing Environments: Moving English into the Lab,” Donna L. Pasternak, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
  • “Multiple Approaches to Teaching and Learning New Technologies,” James A. Grabowska, Minnesota State University, Mankato
  • “Ohio State’s Foreign Language Technology Certificate Program,” Diane W. Birckbichler, Ohio State University, Columbus
  • “In the Middle Ages, No One’s Parchment Ever Crashed,” Theodore L. Steinberg, State University of New York, Fredonia

131: Film and the History of Technology

Thursday, 27 December 2007, 8:45–10:00 p.m., Erie, Sheraton Chicago.

Program arranged by the Division on Film

Presiding: Alice Ann Kuzniar, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

  • “Dziga Vertov, the Voice of Technology, and the End of Soviet Film,” Lilya Kaganovsky, University of Illinois, Urbana
  • “Men and Machines: On the Subway with Busby Berkeley,” Sunny Stalter, Auburn University, Auburn
  • “Which Digital Cinema? Notes on an Emerging Poetics of Digital Film Style,” Alexander Ian Olney, York University, PA

159: Got ECCO? The Contents and Discontents of Electronic Media for Early Modern Studies

Friday, 28 December 2007, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Atlanta, Hyatt Regency.

Program arranged by the Division on Restoration and Early-Eighteenth-Century English Literature

Presiding: Cynthia S. Wall, Literature Compass

Speakers: Gail Aw, University of Virginia; Peter Brown, University of Kent; David A. Golumbia, University of Virginia; Kathryn J. Lowerre, Michigan State University; David Radcliffe, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Christine Ruotolo, University Librarian

174: Free Culture: Intellectual Property and Restricted Archives

Friday, 28 December 2007, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Truffles, Hyatt Regency.

Program arranged by the Division on Methods of Literary Research

Presiding: William Baker, Northern Illinois University

  • “Democracy, Access, and Constraint: Making Property of the Past,” Benjamin J. Robertson, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • “Popular Culture and Intellectual Property Rights: A Marriage of (In)Convenience,” Kenneth Womack, Penn State University, Altoona
  • “Phish in the Age of Digital Reproduction: Intellectual and Intimate Property in the Networked Archive,” Scott M. Kushner, Duke University

177: The Electronic New Variorum Shakespeare

Friday, 28 December 2007, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Columbus Hall K and L, Hyatt Regency.

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on the New Variorum Edition of Shakespeare

Presiding: Suzanne Gossett, Loyola University, Chicago

  • “How to Do Things with Variants: Text Visualization in the Electronic New Variorum Shakespeare,” Alan Galey, University of Alberta
  • “Sums and Parts, in View of a Complex Whole: A Response to the Electronic New Variorum Shakespeare Interface,” Raymond G. Siemens, University of Victoria

183: Writing Empires: Composition and the Expansion of English

Friday, 28 December 2007, 8:30–9:45 a.m., New Orleans, Hyatt Regency.

Program arranged by the Society for Critical Exchange

Presiding: Kurt M. Koenigsberger, Case Western Reserve University

  • “Recasting the Outcast: Foretelling the Future of the 101 Legacy at the University of Prince Edward Island,” Wendy Shilton, University of Prince Edward Island
  • “Visiting the Outposts: The Future of Writing in a Seminar Approach to General Education,” Kimberly K. Emmons, Case Western Reserve University
  • “Powered by WAC: New Technologies and the Expanding Reach of English,” Cheryl C. Smith, Baruch University, City University of New York
  • “‘Writing Studies’ and the Future of English,” Ann Jurecic, Rutgers University, New Brunswick

Respondent: Jessica Beth Yood, Lehman University, City University of New York

For copies of papers, visit www.case.edu/affil/sce.


212: Using Digital Archives

Friday, 28 December 2007, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Columbus Hall K and L, Hyatt Regency.

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Scholarly Editions

Presiding: Donald R. Dickson, Texas A&M University, College Station

  • “Creating Editorial Entry Points at ‘Documenting the American South,’” Jennifer Larson, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • “Archival Constructions of Early Latino Literature,” Anne C. Gebelein, Trinity University, CT
  • “Remaking the Past: ‘The Pepys Ballad Archive,’” Tassie Gniady, University of California, Santa Barbara

215: Novel History, Media History

Friday, 28 December 2007, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Atlanta, Hyatt Regency.

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Media and Literature

Presiding: Ivan Kreilkamp, Indiana University, Bloomington

  • “Beyond Fashion: From the Nineteenth-Century Urban Mysteries Reader to the Cinema Spectator,” Sara Hackenberg, San Francisco State University
  • Ulysses Player Piano,” Paul K. Saint-Amour, University of Pennsylvania
  • “Remediating the Modernist Novel: Judd Morrissey’s Digital Remix,” Jessica Pressman, University of California, Los Angeles

224: Roundtable on Editing Collections of Poetry

Friday, 28 December 2007, noon–1:15 p.m., Water Tower, Hyatt Regency.

Program arranged by the Division on Poetry

Presiding: Cristanne Miller, University at Buffalo, State University of New York; Susan J. Wolfson, Princeton University

Speakers: George J. Bornstein, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; Michael Davidson, University of California, San Diego; Jenny Penberthy, Capilano University; Kenneth M. Price, University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Nigel S. Smith, Princeton University

228: Editing Sound

Friday, 28 December 2007, noon–1:15 p.m., Stetson E, Hyatt Regency.

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Bibliography and Textual Studies

Presiding: Peter J. Kalliney, University of Kentucky

  • “National Bibliography and the BBC,” Peter J. Kalliney
  • “Cross-Cultural Poetics: The Radio Interview as Document,” Leonard Schwartz, Evergreen State University
  • “How Does a Community Happen in a Sound Archive?” Corey J. Frost, Graduate Center, City University of New York
  • “Framing the Poem: Theory and Practice in the Literary Audio Web Site,” Kenneth W. Sherwood, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

244: Romantic Futures: Romantic Circles at the Start of Its Second Decade

Friday, 28 December 2007, noon–1:15 p.m., Grand Suite 3, Hyatt Regency.

Program arranged by the Keats–Shelley Association of America

Presiding: Steven E. Jones, Loyola University, Chicago

  • Romantic Circles and Romantic Futures,” Neil Fraistat, University of Maryland, College Park
  • Romantic Circles Electronic Editions and the Shape of Romanticism,” Tilar Mazzeo, Colby University
  • “The Practice of Praxis: Reading Romanticism Electronically and the Romantic Circles Praxis Series,” Orrin Nan Chung Wang, University of Maryland, College Park

250: New Reading Interfaces

Friday, 28 December 2007, noon–1:15 p.m., Missouri, Sheraton Chicago.

Program arranged by the Association for Computers and the Humanities

Presiding: Elizabeth Swanstrom, University of California, Santa Barbara

  • “Tag Clouds: Reading the Poetic Interface,” Jeremy Douglass, University of California, San Diego
  • “Toward a Semantic Literary Web: Three Case Histories,” Joseph Paul Tabbi, University of Illinois, Chicago
  • “Reading Shaw’s Legible City,” Elizabeth Swanstrom
  • “Reading the Margins of The Magic Book,” Sarah Jane Sloane, Colorado State University, Fort Collins
  • “Texts in Virtual Contexts: Reading Scholarly Work in 3-D Environments,” Victoria E. Szabo, Duke University

For copies of abstracts, see www.english.ucsb.edu/faculty/rraley/research/conferences/ACH07.html.


256: Professionalization in a Digital Age

Friday, 28 December 2007, 1:45–3:30 p.m., Columbus Hall C and D, Hyatt Regency.

A forum arranged by the Committee on the Status of Graduate Students in the Profession

Presiding: William Erwin Orchard, University of Chicago

  • “Rethinking the First Book: Dissertations as Bits and Bytes,” Jennifer Crewe, Columbia University Press
  • “New Media Scholarship: Implications for Graduate Study,” N. Katherine Hayles, University of California, Los Angeles (abstract available in PDF)
  • “Digital Pedagogy: Taming the Palatiri,” Ian Lancashire, University of Toronto (abstract available in PDF)

Respondent: W. J. T. Mitchell, University of Chicago

For coordinated workshops, see meetings 373 and 472.

261: Lyricism in Modern East Asian Literatures

Friday, 28 December 2007, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Parlor E, Sheraton Chicago.

Program arranged by the Division on East Asian Languages and Literatures after 1900

Presiding: Michelle Yeh, University of California, Davis

  • “Constructing the ‘Narrow Bridge of Art’ between East and West: Virginia Woolf, Ling Shuhua, and Julian Bell,” Patricia Laurence, City University, City University of New York
  • “Desolation: A Transformation of Lyricism in Chinese Cinema from Fei Mu to Tsai Ming-liang,” Leo Chanjen Chen, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
  • “Boon or Bust? The Internet and Chinese Poetry,” Michael Day, National University
  • “Antilyricism in Contemporary Chinese Poetry,” Michelle Yeh

273: Psychoanalysis and Relational Space

Friday, 28 December 2007, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Toronto, Hyatt Regency.

Program arranged by the Division on Psychological Approaches to Literature

Presiding: Esther Rashkin, University of Utah

  • “Gaps Left within Us by the Secrets of Others: Abraham’s Phantom, Freud’s Secret,” William H. Carter, Iowa State University
  • “The Other of Incorporation: Sadomasochism and the Colonial Scene,” Susan Cook, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • “Beyond the Third Space of MySpace: Lacan, Winnicott, and Cyberspace,” Robert Samuels, University of California, Los Angeles
  • “Public Spaces, Other Faces, Liminal Places,” Jennifer Friedlander, Pomona University

279: Teaching Strategies for the New Millennial Business Writing Classroom

Friday, 28 December 2007, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Columbus Hall H, Hyatt Regency.

Program arranged by the Association for Business Communication

Presiding: Jennifer Veltsos, Iowa State University

  • “Literary Fortunes? Web Writers and Google AdSense,” Craig A. Warren, Penn State University, Erie-Behrend
  • “Manifesting Corporate Culture Using Visual Rhetoric,” Jennifer Veltsos
  • “The Virtues of a Spoonful of Sugar: How Humor Helps Students Learn Ethical Business Writing,” Jackson Niday, United States Air Force Academy

For copies of abstracts, write to kwills@iupui.edu.


298: Training Teaching Assistants for the Future: Current Issues on Curricular Shifts at Public Institutions

Friday, 28 December 2007, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Columbus A and B, Sheraton Chicago.

Program arranged by the American Association of Teachers of German

Presiding: Helene Zimmer-Loew, American Association of Teachers of German

  • “Training Graduate Students in Reading for Cultural Literacy,” Katherine Marie Arens, University of Texas, Austin
  • “Cultural Studies in Class, Online, and On-Site in Europe,” Paula Hanssen, Webster University
  • “Learner Needs and Curricular Goals: A Blended Learning Perspective from a Language Program Director,” Susanne Rott, University of Illinois, Chicago

Respondent: Peter Höyng, Emory University

317: Electronic Literature: Reading, Writing, Navigating

Friday, 28 December 2007, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Columbus Hall K and L, Hyatt Regency.

Program sponsored by the MLA Ad Hoc Committee on the Structure of the Convention in conjunction with the MLA Committee on Information Technology

Presiding: Susan Schreibman, University of Maryland, College Park

  • “Exploring Electronic Literature,” Helen DeVinney, University of Maryland, College Park; Jessica Pressman, University of California, Los Angeles
  • “Sculpting E-Poetry in Fractal Space: ConTextTree,” Jeremy Douglass, University of California, San Diego
  • “Selections from Selections,” Christopher T. Funkhouser, New Jersey Institute of Technology
  • “Reading Unwritten Poems: Developing Critical Tools for Electronic Literature,” Davin Heckman, Siena Heights University
  • Beta Writer: Portrait of the Author as Early Adopter,” Mark Marino, University of Southern California
  • “No Exit in Sight: Navigating Giselle Beiguelman’s ‘Esc for Escape,’” Elizabeth Swanstrom, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • RolandHT,” Vika Zafrin, Brown University

N. Katherine Hayles has described electronic literature as “‘digital born,’ a first-generation digital object created on a computer and (usually) meant to be read on a computer.” The Electronic Literature Organization describes it as “works with important literary aspects that take advantage of the capabilities and contexts provided by the stand-alone or networked computer.”

This poster session provides the opportunity for attendees to engage firsthand with works of electronic literature, to meet with electronic literature authors and theorists, and to engage with interactive computer presentations of their work. Presenters will exhibit their work simultaneously, creating ample opportunity for discussion and demonstration.

324: Brave New World: Digital Scholarship and the Future of Early American Studies

Friday, 28 December 2007, 3:30–4:45 p.m., New Orleans, Hyatt Regency.

Program arranged by the Division on American Literature to 1800

Presiding: Karen A. Weyler, University of North Carolina, Greensboro

  • “The Occom Project: Creating and Teaching with an Archival Web Site,” Ivy Schweitzer, Dartmouth University
  • “The Charles Brockden Brown Electronic Archive and Scholarly Edition and the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI),” Mark L. Kamrath, University of Central Florida
  • “Teaching Early American Literature with Digital Resources,” Michelle Harper, Readex

329: Breaking into Print: Multicultural Authors and Independent Publishers

Friday, 28 December 2007, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Acapulco, Hyatt Regency.

Program arranged by the Council of Literary Magazines and Presses

Presiding: Dorothy J. Wang, Williams University

  • “X-Reference: Aesthetics, Politics, Inclusivity, and the Encyclopedia Project,” Tisa Bryant, Saint John’s University, NY
  • “Returning to the Question of the ‘Many Different,’” Renee Gladman, Brown University
  • “The Origenes of a New World Order: The Case History of a Cuban Vanguardist Small Press in a Global Marketplace,” Eric C. Keenaghan, University at Albany, State University of New York
  • “Postmulticulturalism: Editing Tinfish from Hawai‘i,” Susan Martha Schultz, University of Hawai‘i, Manoa

Respondent: Aldon Lynn Nielsen, Penn State University, University Park


361: Textual Visualization

Friday, 28 December 2007, 7:15–8:30 p.m., Columbus Hall K and L, Hyatt Regency.

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Information Technology

Presiding: Maureen Jameson, University at Buffalo, State University of New York

  • “Visualizing Poetry: "The Poetess Archive Database,” Ira Greenberg, Miami University, Oxford
  • “Visualizing Textual Genesis: The Versioning Machine,” Susan Schreibman, University of Maryland, College Park
  • “Tools for Visualization: TAPoR,” Geoffrey Rockwell, McMaster University
  • “Visualizing Your Bibliography: Zotero,” Kari M. Kraus, University of Rochester
  • “The Future of Visualization,” Arno Bosse, University of Chicago
  • “Visualizing Patterns: MONK,” Kirsten C. Uszkalo, St. Francis Xavier University; Sara Steger, University of Georgia

A variety of new tools are being developed that are designed to let scholars literally see text in new ways. Displays of word occurrences, pattern distribution, collocation, and textual genesis can yield insights about a text that might not be revealed or as easily comprehended without the visual element.

This poster session provides the opportunity for attendees to engage firsthand with visualization tools, to meet with the scholars who develop and use them, and to engage with interactive computer presentations of these tools. Presenters will exhibit their work simultaneously, creating ample opportunity for discussion and demonstration.

For demos and copies of abstracts, visit http://textualvisualization.blogspot.com.

373: Scholarship in New Media

Friday, 28 December 2007, 7:15–8:30 p.m., Columbus Hall C and D, Hyatt Regency.

A workshop arranged in conjunction with the forum Professionalization in a Digital Age (256)

Presiding: Markus Zisselsberger, Binghamton University, State University of New York

  • “On Scholarship,” Matthew Gary Kirschenbaum, University of Maryland, College Park (abstract available in PDF)
  • “On Electric Editing,” Dino Franco Felluga, Purdue University, West Lafayette
  • “On Pedagogy,” Todd Samuel Presner, University of California, Los Angeles (abstract available in PDF)
  • “On Collaboration,” McKenzie Wark, New School

For copies of papers, write to weorchar@uchicago.edu after 1 December.

376: Performance and Technology: Writing and Speaking as Techne

Friday, 28 December 2007, 7:15–8:30 p.m., Stetson E, Hyatt Regency.

Program arranged by the Division on Drama

Presiding: Angela C. Pao, Indiana University, Bloomington

  • “‘What the Bleep?!’: The Technical Difficulties of Cursing in Topdog/Underdog,” Sandy Alexandre, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • “Type as Performance: Gender, Technology, and Collaboration in the Typing Explosion,” Paul Benzon, Rutgers University, New Brunswick
  • “Allegories of Information,” W. B. Worthen, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

402: Early Modern Research in the Digital Age

Saturday, 29 December 2007, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Stetson F, Hyatt Regency.

Program arranged by the Division on Literature of the English Renaissance, Excluding Shakespeare

Presiding: Jonathan Gil Harris, George Washington University

  • “Digital Scholarship and DEEP: The Database of Early English Playbooks,” Alan B. Farmer, Ohio State University, Columbus; Zachary Lesser, University of Pennsylvania
  • “Not Either-Or but Rather Both-And: Material and Electronic Resources for Early Modern Research,” Angelica Alicia Duran, Purdue University, West Lafayette
  • “Digital (Inter)Nationalism,” Jacques Lezra, University of Wisconsin, Madison

408: Networks: Interrelationships Characterizing the Subjects We Study and Our Methods of Studying Them

Saturday, 29 December 2007, 8:30–9:45 a.m., New Orleans, Hyatt Regency.

Program arranged by the American Literature Section

Presiding: Sandra Abelson Zagarell, Oberlin University

  • “After Place: A Report from the Blogospheric Frontier,” Scott M. Kushner, Duke University
  • “Infrastructuralism: The Wire and the Limits of Cultural Studies,” Caroline E. Levine, University of Wisconsin, Madison
  • “The Casablanca Connection: Two Universities Building a Moroccan American Studies Connection,” Nina Y. Morgan, Kennesaw State University

Respondent: Priscilla B. Wald, Duke University


432: The Josephine A. Roberts Forum: E-Editing in Corpora

Saturday, 29 December 2007, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Stetson F, Hyatt Regency.

Program arranged by the Renaissance English Text Society

Presiding: Michael Roy Denbo, Bronx Community University, City University of New York

  • “Prototyping a ‘Knowledgebase’ Approach to Texts and Secondary Resources in Renaissance Studies,” Raymond G. Siemens, University of Victoria
  • “Providing a Base for E-Editing: The Text Creation Partnership Project,” Shawn Martin, University of Michigan Press
  • “The Emory Women Writers Resource Project: Teaching Students, Training Students,” Sheila T. Cavanagh, Emory University

446: Methods for Making Technical Communication Research Meaningful for Learners: Using Technical Communication Research to Instruct

Saturday, 29 December 2007, 10:15–11:30 a.m., New Orleans, Hyatt Regency.

Program arranged by the Association of Teachers of Technical Writing

Presiding: Marc Santos, Purdue University, West Lafayette

  • “Integrated Online and Digital Resources for Teaching Syntax and Punctuation,” Karl Stolley, Illinois Institute of Technology; Amy Ferdinandt Stolley, Illinois Institute of Technology
  • “The Transfer and Diffusion of Content-Management Technologies in Technical-Communication Work Groups: Expanding Notions of Learners and Researcher Roles,” Rebekka Andersen, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
  • “Global Learning Experiences: Transforming the Classroom with Multilingual Open-Source Content-Management Systems,” Todd Kelsey, Illinois Institute of Technology
  • “Technically Wiki: Collaborative Environments in Technical Writing Using Wikis,” Shish Aikat, University of Southern California

For copies of abstracts, write to denise.tillery@unlv.edu.

455: Literary Geospaces

Saturday, 29 December 2007, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Atlanta, Hyatt Regency.

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Computer Studies in Language and Literature

Presiding: Stephen J. Ramsay, University of Nebraska, Lincoln

  • “Mental Mapping: A Digital Approach to Teaching London,” Janelle A. Jenstad, University of Victoria
  • “Mapping the Socioeconomic Demographics of the Early Modern London Book Trade,” David Lee Gants, Florida State University; Sarah Neville, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton
  • “Using Court Records to Map the Witchcraft Accusations, Salem 1692,” Benjamin Ray, University of Virginia
  • “Beyond Boston: Georeferencing Irish American Literature,” Matthew Jockers, Stanford University

472: Keywords for a Digital Profession

Saturday, 29 December 2007, noon–1:15 p.m., Columbus Hall C and D, Hyatt Regency.

A workshop arranged in conjunction with the forum Professionalization in a Digital Age (256)

Presiding: Megan Moore, Newberry Library

For copies of papers, write to weorchar@uchicago.edu after 1 December.

483: Morris as Metatext: Manuscripts, Print Forms, and Illustrations

Saturday, 29 December 2007, noon–1:15 p.m., Plaza Ballroom A, Hyatt Regency.

Program arranged by the William Morris Society

Presiding: Kathleen O. Sims, Manchester, NH

  • “Gender and Socialism in Walter Crane’s Political Cartoons,” Elizabeth Carolyn Miller, Ohio University, Athens
  • “‘Love Clad as an Image-Maker’: The Morris Online Edition and NINES (Networked Infrastructure for Nineteenth-Century Electronic Scholarship),” Charles Sligh, Wake Forest University
  • “Morris’s Jason from Notebook to Kelmscott Edition,” Florence S. Boos, University of Iowa

For copies of abstracts, write to florence-boos@uiowa.edu.


523: Archive Trouble

Saturday, 29 December 2007, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Stetson F, Hyatt Regency.

Program arranged by the Society for Textual Scholarship

Presiding: Andrew M. Stauffer, Boston University

  • “Arkhe: Commencement, Commandment, Possibility as Place,” Martha Nell Smith, University of Maryland, College Park
  • “‘These Fragments’: The Archive and the Shapes of Historical Contingency,” Ben Alexander, University of California, Los Angeles
  • “Archive Burning: The Archival Event and the Great Fire(s) of London,” Kathleen M. Keating, Greensboro University
  • “Archive Trauma,” Robert Matuozzi, Washington State University, Pullman

535: Teaching Undergraduate Linguistics

Saturday, 29 December 2007, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Huron, Sheraton Chicago.

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on General Linguistics

Presiding: Rebecca Day Babcock, University of Texas of the Permian Basin

  • “Teaching Phonetics to Advanced Students of German,” Iulia Pittman, Auburn University, Auburn
  • “Factors Affecting Success in a Junior-Level Intro to English Linguistics Course Face-to-Face and Online,” Rebecca Day Babcock
  • “The Very Least Teachers Need to Know about Linguistics but Are Too Unaware to Ask,” Eric J. Hyman, Fayetteville State University
  • “A Presentation for Linguistics Students: The Sino-Tibetan Language Family,” Charlene A. Lea, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
  • “Changing Linguistic Pedagogy,” Marnie Jo Petray, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

Respondent: Roslyn Sue Raney, University of San Mateo, CA

541: Electronic Literature: After Afternoon

Saturday, 29 December 2007, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Mississippi, Sheraton Chicago.

Program arranged by the Division on Methods of Literary Research

Presiding: Neil Fraistat, University of Maryland, College Park

  • “Picture and Book Remain: After Two Decades of Hypertext Literature,” Michael Joyce, Vassar University
  • “This Afternoon,” Matthew Gary Kirschenbaum, University of Maryland, College Park
  • “Play, Flow, and Mix: Paradigms for Electronic Literature,” N. Katherine Hayles, University of California, Los Angeles

545: Are Eighteenth-Century Studies Changing Literary Studies? Doing the Math

Saturday, 29 December 2007, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Plaza Ballroom B, Hyatt Regency.

Program arranged by the Division on Late-Eighteenth-Century English Literature

Presiding: Janet L. Sorensen, University of California, Berkeley

  • “Reading the Eighteenth Century by Numbers: Toward a New Quantitative Approach to the Sublime in Literature,” Mark Algee-Hewitt, New York University
  • “Amateur Literary Culture and the ‘Long Tail’ Print Marketplace,” Michelle Nancy Levy, Simon Fraser University

560: The Ends of Cinema in the Digital Age

Saturday, 29 December 2007, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Plaza Ballroom A, Hyatt Regency.

Program arranged by the Division on Film

Presiding: Nora M. Alter, University of Florida; Anna Everett, University of California, Santa Barbara

  • “The Ends of Cinema and the New Cinematics: The Work of Agnès Varda,” Jennifer Chamarette, University of Cambridge
  • “Flickering Images: From the Kinetoscope to YouTube,” Wheeler Winston Dixon, University of Nebraska, Lincoln
  • “Rotoscopic Bodies,” Lutz Koepnick, Washington University
  • “Rethinking Film Theory in the Digital Age,” Vincent Piturro, University of Delaware, Newark

For copies of abstracts, write to everett@filmandmedia.ucsb.edu.

561: Performance and Technology: Performing Machines

Saturday, 29 December 2007, 3:30–4:45 p.m., New Orleans, Hyatt Regency.

Program arranged by the Division on Drama

Presiding: Karen Shimakawa, New York University

  • “On the Subway with Elmer Rice,” Sunny Stalter, Auburn University, Auburn
  • “Technologies of/and Performance and Globalizing India,” Neelima Talwar, Indian Institute of Technology
  • “Can the Subaltern Perform Data?” Mark Bartlett, San Francisco Art Institute

581: Cash Bar Arranged by the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women and the Brown University Women Writers Project

Saturday, 29 December 2007, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Columbus Hall G, Hyatt Regency.

 


592: New Poetic Archives

Saturday, 29 December 2007, 7:15–8:30 p.m., Stetson F, Hyatt Regency.

Program arranged by the Division on Restoration and Early-Eighteenth-Century English Literature

Presiding: Ann Louise Kibbie, Bowdoin University

  • “Eighteenth-Century Scottish Poetry Online: Making the Case for Smaller-Scale Digital Archives,” Corey Edward Andrews, Youngstown State University
  • “Early Modern British Poetry in Archives Old and New,” Lorna J. Clymer, California State University, Bakersfield
  • “Programming Poetry: Visualizations in the Poetess Archive Database,” Laura C. Mandell, Miami University, Oxford

601: Voice as Sound: The Material Voice in Discourses on Bodies and Media

Saturday, 29 December 2007, 7:15–8:30 p.m., Plaza Ballroom A, Hyatt Regency.

A special session.

Presiding: Annette Schlichter, University of California, Irvine

  • “Voiceless Bodies, Acts of Speech: Performance, Performativity, and the Absence of Voice,” Annette Schlichter
  • “The Digital Voice of an Angel,” Carole-Anne Tyler, University of California, Riverside
  • “Projection and Ontology in Digital Voice,” Eyal Amiran, University of California, Irvine

Respondent: Alexander G. Weheliye, Northwestern University

607: Poetry and Globalization

Saturday, 29 December 2007, 7:15–8:30 p.m., Atlanta, Hyatt Regency.

Program arranged by the Division on Poetry

Presiding: Jahan Ramazani, University of Virginia

  • “Slamming around the World: Local Tactics and Global Strategies in Performance Poetry,” Corey J. Frost, Graduate Center, City University of New York
  • “After Print: Crisis and Poetry on the Internet,” Simon Yiu-Tsan Ng, University of Hong Kong
  • “Borderless Bodies: Linh Dinh, Literary Internets, and the Poetics of Global (Dis)Connection,” Hai-Dang Phan, University of Wisconsin, Madison

649: Sampling the Original: Rethinking Appropriation, Attribution, and Copyright

Saturday, 29 December 2007, 9:00–10:15 p.m., Plaza Ballroom A, Hyatt Regency.

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Information Technology

Presiding: Thomas C. Spear, Lehman University, City University of New York

  • “Remixing Free Culture: Twentieth-Century Copyright in the Twenty-First-Century Classroom,” Kari M. Kraus, University of Rochester
  • “Media-Enriched Critical Writing as Gray-Market Transgression,” Victoria E. Szabo, Duke University
  • “You Can, but You May Not: Copyright, Scholars, and the Temptations of New Media,” Jeffrey Ankrom, Bloomington, IN

660: Editing and Interpreting in the Digital Age

Sunday, 30 December 2007, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Grand Suite 3, Hyatt Regency.

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Scholarly Editions

Presiding: Bruce R. Smith, University of Southern California

  • “Scholarspace: A New Paradigm for the Digital Humanities,” Thomas Bartscherer, University of Chicago
  • “Digital Editions, Online Resources, Stare Decisis, and a Crux in The Changeling,” Lars Engle, University of Tulsa
  • “The Descriptive Bibliography of Electronic Scholarly Editions,” David Lee Gants, Florida State University

662: The Novel and/as Written Testimony

Sunday, 30 December 2007, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Horner, Hyatt Regency.

A special session.

Presiding: Tony E. Jackson, University of North Carolina, Charlotte

  • “Testimony on Trial: Conrad and James,” Brian Artese, Agnes Scott University
  • “Writing, Orality, and the Novel,” Tony E. Jackson
  • “The Testimony of Electronic Voice in Recent Fiction: Radio, Record, Tape,” Daniel Punday, Purdue University, Calumet

678: “Bartleby,” Resistance, and the City of Immaterial Labor

Sunday, 30 December 2007, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Stetson B and C, Hyatt Regency.

A special session.

Presiding: Kimberly DeFazio, Clarkson University

  • “The Office of the Dead Letter: Bartleby, Managerial Capitalism, and Writing,” Rekha A. Rosha, Wake Forest University
  • “Lift Every Voice: Silence as Complicity in ‘Bartleby the Scrivener,’” Daniel L. Zins, Atlanta, GA
  • “Both/Or and/or Neither/Nor: Melville’s ‘Bartleby’ and the Economy of Différance,” Dennis Williams, University of Charleston
  • “Bartleby and Materiality in Cybercapitalism,” Stephen C. Tumino, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh

704: Literary Criticism for the Twenty-First Century: Topology, Politics, Mind

Sunday, 30 December 2007, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Columbus Hall G, Hyatt Regency.

Program arranged by the Division on Literary Criticism

Presiding: Herman Rapaport, Wake Forest University

  • “Of Topology: A Proposal for a New Criticism,” Robert P. Marzec, Purdue University, West Lafayette
  • “Psychoanalytic Historicity and the Politics of Close Reading: A New Approach to Literary Criticism,” Esther Rashkin, University of Utah
  • “Onlyne Revolutions: Moving toward Wiki Criticism,” Mark Phillips, University of Cincinnati

747: New Approaches to Endgame

Sunday, 30 December 2007, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Columbian, Hyatt Regency.

Program arranged by the Samuel Beckett Society

Presiding: Linda Ben-Zvi, Tel Aviv University

  • Endgame and Performativity,” Richard Begam, University of Wisconsin, Madison
  • “The Japanese Endgame and the New ‘Lost’ Generation,” Minako Okamuro, Waseda University
  • “Rethinking Endgame’s Genesis in a Digital Format,” Dirk Michael Van Hulle, University of Antwerp
  • “Masculine Dead Masculine: Western Masculinity’s Endgame,” Jennifer M. Jeffers, Cleveland State University

757: How Revolutionary Are We? Current Issues on Curricular Shifts at Private Institutions

Sunday, 30 December 2007, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Colorado, Sheraton Chicago.

Program arranged by the American Association of Teachers of German

Presiding: Helene Zimmer-Loew, American Association of Teachers of German

  • “A GPS (Global Positioning System) for Teaching the National Narrative? Cultural Area Studies and the German Curriculum,” Michael E. Geisler, Middlebury University
  • “The Role of Language in Collegiate Foreign Language Programmatic Reform,” Hiram H. Maxim, Emory University
  • “Cultural Studies from the Bottom Up? Curricular Planning along the Faultlines between ‘Instrumental’ and ‘Academic’ Agendas,” Ingeborg Christina Walther, Duke University

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