Conferences Modern Language Association Digital Humanities Sessions

Guide to Digital-Humanities Talks at the 2006 MLA Convention

 

Digital Humanities Sessions – MLA 2006

The Association for Computers and the Humanities has compiled this list of sessions with digital-humanities talks at the 2006 Modern Language Association Convention (in Philadelphia from December 27 through 30). Some of these sessions contain only one or two relevant talks, but this list includes the entire program for each session.

In most cases you must pay the convention-registration fee in order to attend these talks. But three sessions are free and open to the public: “The Sound of Poetry, the Poetry of Sound”, “Sounding the Visual”, and “Postmodernity: Liabilities and Opportunities”. MLA talks are published at the discretion of their authors; if you want to obtain the text of a talk you were unable to attend, the best method is to contact the author directly.

Although the 2006 convention is now in the past, this information will remain available, as a record of what went on. Similar information for many other years is available via the main page on ACH MLA sessions.

Corrections and additions are welcome; please send them to John.Lavagnino at kcl.ac.uk.


Summary of Sessions

Wednesday, 27 December 2006

5:15–6:30 p.m.

8:45–10:00 p.m.

Thursday, 28 December 2006

8:30–9:45 a.m.

10:00 or 10:15–11:30 or 11:45 a.m.

12:00 noon–1:15 p.m.

1:45–3:00 p.m.

3:30–4:45 p.m.

7:15–8:30 p.m.

Friday, 29 December 2006

8:30–9:45 a.m.

10:15–11:30 a.m.

12:00 noon–1:15 or 1:45 p.m.

1:45–3:00 p.m.

3:30–4:45 p.m.

7:15–8:30 p.m.

9:00–10:15 p.m.

Saturday, 30 December 2006

8:30–9:45 a.m.

10:15–11:30 a.m.

12:00 noon–1:15 p.m.

1:45–3:00 p.m.


30: Rhetoricizing Technology, Technologizing Rhetoric

Wednesday, 27 December 2006, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 411–412, Philadelphia Marriott.

Program arranged by the Division on the History and Theory of Rhetoric and Composition

Presiding: Peter Leslie Mortensen, University of Illinois, Urbana

  • “The Rhetorical Canons as an Ecology of (New Media) Practice,” Collin Gifford Brooke, Syracuse University
  • “The Typesetter as the Scapegoat of Industrial Literature,” Cary Hollinshead-Strick, University of Pennsylvania
  • “Molecular Vision: Analogies of Technology in the Bio-Nano Age,” Michelle A. Sidler, Auburn University, Auburn

91: iPod Capitalism

Wednesday, 27 December 2006, 8:45–10:00 p.m., 308, Philadelphia Marriott.

A special session.

Presiding: Robert A. Wilkie, University at Albany, State University of New York

  • “Technology, the Image, and the Production of Value,” Paul Smith, George Mason University
  • “DeLillo's Financial Sublime,” Alison Shonkwiler, Rutgers University, New Brunswick
  • “Red Critique in a Digital World,” Robert A. Wilkie

105: Innovative Uses of Technology in L1 and L2 Writing

Thursday, 28 December 2006, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Regency Ballroom C, Loews.

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Information Technology

  • “Meet EMMA: The English Markup and Management Application,” June Anne Griffin, University of Nebraska, Lincoln
  • “Making the Case for Online Composition Classes,” Catherine Carsley, University of Maryland, Adelphi
  • “Improvising Writing and Critical Thinking in an Online Forum,” Emily E. Scida, University of Virginia
  • “Computer Stories: Using Web Pages for Creative Writing in a Foreign Language,” Sylvia H. Rieger, Harvard University
  • “Using Mark Twain's Digital Manuscripts in Teaching Composition,” Matthew Klauza, Auburn University, Auburn
  • “Virtual Peer Review: Bringing the Classroom Together One Click at a Time,” Lesley L. Broder, Stony Brook University, State University of New York
  • “Digital Literacies: New Directions for Teaching Writing,” Regina A. Clemens-Fox, Arizona State University, Tempe

108: Walter J. Ong's Orality and Literacy at Twenty-Five

Thursday, 28 December 2006, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Congress C, Loews.

A special session.

Presiding: John P. Walter, Saint Louis University

  • “Orality, Literacy, and Ong's Asymmetrical Opposition,” Jerry S. Harp, Lewis and Clark College
  • “Orality and Literacy as a Methodological Apparatus for Examining Women's Rhetorics,” Melissa Jane Fiesta, California State University, Long Beach
  • “Ong, Derrida, and the New Media Theory,” David Martyn, Macalester College

For copies of abstracts, visit www.jpwalter.com/MLA2006.

111: Everquesting: Digital Learning and the Humanities

Thursday, 28 December 2006, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Liberty Ballroom Salon C, Philadelphia Marriott.

Program arranged by the MLA Executive Council

Presiding: Priscilla B. Wald, Duke University

  • Anne Balsamo, University of Southern California
  • Cathy N. Davidson, Duke University
  • Anna Everett, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Douglas Thomas, University of Southern California

112: Remapping Genre

Thursday, 28 December 2006, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Commonwealth Hall A2, Loews.

Program arranged by the PMLA Editorial Board

Presiding: Wai Chee Dimock, Yale University

  • “A Labor Theory of Translation,” Emily S. Apter, New York University
  • “Translating Genre: Whitman Crossing Borders Electronically,” Ed Folsom, University of Iowa
  • “Genre as Somatype: Medieval Chinese Genre Theory,” Stephen Owen, Harvard University
  • “The Last Night of All: The Unfinishable Work as a Genre,” Michael Wood, Princeton University

133: The Sound of Poetry, the Poetry of Sound

Thursday, 28 December 2006, 10:00–11:45 a.m., Regency Ballroom A & B, Loews.

The Presidential Forum. Presiding: Marjorie Gabrielle Perloff, Stanford University

  • Susan A. Stewart, Princeton University
  • Susan Howe, University at Buffalo, State University of New York
  • Charles Bernstein, University of Pennsylvania
  • Yoko Tawada, Hamburg, Germany
  • Kenneth Goldsmith, New York, NY

For coordinated workshops, see meetings 192 and 244 and 272.

144: Screening the War Machine: Cinema, Sovreignty, Surveillance

Thursday, 28 December 2006, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 306, Philadelphia Marriott.

Program arranged by the Division on Film

Presiding: Anna Everett, University of California, Santa Barbara

  • “Israeli-Palestinian Conflict Documentary: Political Aesthetics in Still Life,” Terri J. Ginsberg, New York, NY
  • “Electronic Media and the Feminine: The Manchurian Candidate before and after 9/11,” Mark Edwin Wildermuth, University of Texas of the Permian Basin
  • The Battle of Algiers Redux,” Elizabeth Dale Samet, United States Military Academy

155: Edition Wars

Thursday, 28 December 2006, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Grand Ballroom Salon I, Philadelphia Marriott.

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Scholarly Editions

Presiding: Nicholas Halmi, University of Washington, Seattle

  • Martha Nell Smith, University of Maryland, College Park
  • Nigel S. Smith, Princeton University
  • Gordon Teskey, Harvard University

173: Textual Materialities

Thursday, 28 December 2006, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Grand Ballroom Salon I, Philadelphia Marriott.

Program arranged by the Society for Textual Scholarship

Presiding: Neil Fraistat, University of Maryland, College Park

  • “Save As: Textual Studies and the Challenges of Born-Digital Literature,” Matthew Gary Kirschenbaum, University of Maryland, College Park
  • “Picture Criticism: Textual Studies and the Image,” Kari M. Kraus, University of Rochester
  • “Textual Studies and the Book,” Peter Bigland Stallybrass, University of Pennsylvania

193: Wikis, Authority, and the Public Sphere: Examining the Impact of Dynamic, Multiauthored Digital Texts

Thursday, 28 December 2006, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Grand Ballroom Salon L, Philadelphia Marriott.

A special session.

Presiding: Amit Ray, Rochester Institute of Technology

  • “The Digital Palimpsest: Reviewing the Author Function in the Age of Wikis,” Erhardt Graeff, Rochester Institute of Technology; Amit Ray
  • “Wikipedia: The University and the Open Archive,” David Parry, University at Albany, State University of New York
  • “Rewriting Hejinian's My Life: Authorship, Gender, and Drag on a Collaborative Wiki,” Leisha J. Jones, Penn State University, University Park

For copies of abstracts and working papers, visit http://honors.rit.edu/~wiki.

194: Literary Studies in the Public Sphere

Thursday, 28 December 2006, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Liberty Ballroom Salon C, Philadelphia Marriott.

A special session.

Presiding: Jeffrey J. Williams, Carnegie Mellon University

  • “Professors without Borders: Literary Bloggers and the Public Sphere,” Amardeep Singh, Lehigh University
  • “The Uses of Literature: An Un-manifesto,” Rita Felski, University of Virginia
  • “Critical Conditions: Writing Online and Off,” Michael F. Bérubé, Penn State University, University Park

232: Digital Medievalism and the Single Scholar

Thursday, 28 December 2006, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Grand Ballroom Salon K, Philadelphia Marriott.

Program arranged by the Association for Computers and the Humanities

Presiding: Dorothy Carr Porter, University of Kentucky

  • “The Whole World on My iBook: The Cotton Anglo-Saxon Mappamundi Project,” Martin Foys, Hood College
  • “Saints, Technology, and the Art of Collaboration,” Amy Ogden, University of Virginia
  • “Reflections of a Digital Antiquary,” David Radcliffe, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

For copies of abstracts, visit www.ach.org/mla/mla06/ after 1 November.

233: Researching Advanced Foreign Language Learning

Thursday, 28 December 2006, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Washington C, Loews.

Program arranged by the Division on Applied Linguistics

Presiding: Julia R. Herschensohn, University of Washington, Seattle

  • “Comparison of Two Spanish Composition and Conversation Classes: Explicit and Implicit Focus on Form,” Graziela Rondon-Pari, University at Buffalo, State University of New York
  • “Using Corpora to Research Advanced Language Writing,” Estela Ene, University of Arizona, Tucson

244: Sounding the Visual

Thursday, 28 December 2006, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Regency Ballroom C, Loews.

A workshop arranged in conjunction with the forum “The Sound of Poetry, the Poetry of Sound”.

Presiding: Johanna Drucker, University of Virginia

  • Hélène Aji, Université du Maine, Le Mans
  • Roland Greene, Stanford University
  • Brian M. Reed, University of Washington, Seattle
  • Johanna Drucker
  • Joan Retallack, Bard College
  • Ming-Qian Ma, University at Buffalo, State University of New York

268: Siting Citation: Quotation, Paratexts, and the Poetics of the Social

Thursday, 28 December 2006, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Grand Ballroom Salon L, Philadelphia Marriott.

A special session.

Presiding: Alan C. Golding, University of Louisville

  • “Miss M[arianne] M[oore]: ‘Bulldoggy’ on Suffrage,” Mary A. M. Chapman, University of British Columbia
  • “The Footnote Poem: Avant-Garde Poetics and Institutional Form(ation)s,” Alan C. Golding
  • “Notes on Flarf; or, The Internet and Avant-Garde Formalism,” Vincent Nicholas LoLordo, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

269: Bilingualism, Language Contact, and Language Learning

Thursday, 28 December 2006, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Congress B, Loews.

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on General Linguistics

Presiding: Roslyn Sue Raney, College of San Mateo, CA

  • “Bilingualism as a Threat to Languages: The Paradox of Language Endangerment,” Janina Brutt-Griffler, University at Buffalo, State University of New York
  • “Sächsisch als Verlierersprache? Insights into the Status of Saxon German Fifteen Years after Reunification,” Keith Kennetz, University of Georgia
  • “Methodological Approaches in Computer-Mediated Communication in the Second or Foreign Language Classroom: Implications for Theory and Practice,” Bryan Smith, Arizona State University, Tempe
  • “The Role of ASL in the English Prose of Deaf College Students,” Rebecca S. Day Babcock, University of Texas of the Permian Basin
  • “Nonlinguist American Raters' Ability to Detect Segmental and Suprasegmental Features in the Romanian Accent in English,” Iulia Pittman, Auburn University, Auburn

270: (Re)Imaging the Performance Archive

Thursday, 28 December 2006, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 306, Philadelphia Marriott.

Program arranged by the Division on Drama

  • “Homo Sacer Data Bodies,” Jon McKenzie, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
  • “Performing for an Alternative Archive in July Monarchy France,” Cary Hollinshead-Strick, University of Pennsylvania

282: Digital Shakespeares

Thursday, 28 December 2006, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Liberty Ballroom Salon C, Philadelphia Marriott.

Program arranged by the Division on Shakespeare

Presiding: Lowell Gallagher, University of California, Los Angeles

  • “Shakespeare Film in the Age of Digital Incunabula (1984–2000),” Peter S. Donaldson, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • “Cyber Shakespeare: The Impact of Non-English Sites and Archives,” Alexander C. Y. Huang, Penn State University, University Park
  • “The Panopticon in the Playground: Shakespeare and Appropriation Online,” Christy Desmet, University of Georgia; Sujata Iyengar, University of Georgia

333: Reportage, Class, and War

Thursday, 28 December 2006, 7:15–8:30 p.m., 306, Philadelphia Marriott.

Program arranged by the Division on Nonfiction Prose Studies, Excluding Biography and Autobiography

Presiding: Jennifer L. Bernhardt Steadman, Trinity College, CT

  • “Remember the Maine? Journalistic Interpellation and the Spanish-American War,” Tania Gentic-Valencia, University of Pennsylvania
  • “Ernie Pyle, Meet Busby Berkeley and the Matrix: The Technomechanization of the Working Class in World War II and Iraq,” Todd Vogel, University of Washington, Bothell
  • ““For Y'All This Is Just a Show but We Live in This Movie”: Vietnam, Iraq, and the War Documentary,” Tony Grajeda, University of Central Florida

337: High-Performance Computing and Textual Studies

Thursday, 28 December 2006, 7:15–8:30 p.m., Regency Ballroom C1, Loews.

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Information Technology

Presiding: Geoffrey Rockwell, McMaster University

  • “What Is High-Performance Computing, and Why Does It Matter?” Geoffrey Rockwell
  • “A Million Books and High-Performance Computing,” Gregory Crane, Tufts University

347: Research Instruction: Teaching Information Literacy with the MLA International Bibliography

Friday, 29 December 2006, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 404, Philadelphia Marriott.

Program arranged by the MLA Advisory Committee on the MLA International Bibliography

Presiding: H. Faye Christenberry, University of Washington, Seattle

  • “Joining the Academic Conversation: Faculty Member–Librarian Collaboration in Teaching the MLA International Bibliography to Undergraduates,” Laura R. Braunstein, Dartmouth College
  • “Information Literacy and the MLA International Bibliography: A Core Competency for Undergraduates,” Robert Matuozzi, Pullman, WA
  • “Using the Interdisciplinary Nature of the MLA International Bibliography to Teach Information Literacy,” Elisabeth E. Pankl, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

349: Theory of Mind across Disciplines

Friday, 29 December 2006, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Liberty Ballroom Salon A, Philadelphia Marriott.

A special session.

Presiding: Peter J. Simon, W. W. Norton

  • “Theory of Mind and the Rhetoric of Composition,” Joseph Bizup, Columbia University
  • “Theory of Mind, Detective Fiction, and the Case Method,” Simon Stern, Harvard University
  • “Dontdatehimgirl.com and Theory of Mind; or, When Literary Criticism Met Cognitive Science,” Lisa Zunshine, University of Kentucky

Respondent: Barbara Herrnstein Smith, Duke University

371: Cyphernetics: Signs, Codes, Texts

Friday, 29 December 2006, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 306, Philadelphia Marriott.

Program arranged by the Division on Literature and Science

Presiding: Arielle Saiber, Bowdoin College

  • “Order from Order,” Wendy H. Chun, Brown University
  • “Dovetailing Details Fly Apart—All Over, Again, in Code, in Poetry, in Chreods,” Stephanie Strickland, Parsons the New School for Design
  • “Abducting the Index,” Kris Paulsen, University of California, Berkeley
  • “Cryptomemetic Expression and Evolution in Oulipo,” Matt Rowe, Indiana University, Bloomington

381: The Digital Postcolonial

Friday, 29 December 2006, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Commonwealth Hall A1, Loews.

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Postcolonial Studies in Literature and Culture

Presiding: David Chioni Moore, Macalester College

  • “Cowphone: The Spectacle of Rural Telecommunications in Bangladesh,” Benjamin Conisbee Baer, Princeton University
  • “Digital Indigenes: Pros and Cons of Information Technology as Native Localities Go Global,” John Hunt Peacock, Jr., Maryland Institute College of Art
  • “Extremely Urgent: Nigerian E-mail Spam as African Literary Genre,” David Chioni Moore

390: Of Mass Graves and Transatlantic Exiles: Spain and the Civil War—Still Haunted after All These Years

Friday, 29 December 2006, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Regency Ballroom C1, Loews.

Program arranged by the Division on Twentieth-Century Spanish Literature

Presiding: Ofelia Ferrán, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

  • “Victims and Silences of the Spanish Civil War: The Rupture of the World and the Conflict of Memories,” Ignacio Fernández de Mata, University of Burgos
  • “Políticas de la memoria y semiología del objeto testimonial: Las ‘fosas comunes’ y los ‘papeles de Salamanca’,” Ulrich Winter, Philipps-Universität, Marburg
  • “Looking for Justice in the Virtual World: Francoism Faces the Internet Tribunal,” Gina Ann Herrmann, University of Oregon
  • “Mediterranean Memories, Atlantic Melancholia: The Spanish Civil War in Angelina Muñiz-Huberman's Writing,” Tabea Alexa Linhard, Washington University

398: Reading Code

Friday, 29 December 2006, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 306, Philadelphia Marriott.

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Media and Literature

Presiding: Rita M. Raley, University of California, Santa Barbara

  • “Code? (((Who?) Reads?) What?),” John Cayley, London, England
  • “Becoming Encoded,” David A. Golumbia, University of Virginia
  • “Exe.cut(up)able Statements: Algorithmics as a Structural Dimension of Literature,” Florian Cramer, Piet Zwart Institute

Respondent: Mark Marino, University of Southern California

401: Television and Film Narratives

Friday, 29 December 2006, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 402–403, Philadelphia Marriott.

Program arranged by the Society for the Study of Narrative Literature

Presiding: Hilary P. Dannenberg, University of Bayreuth

  • “The Unmaking of the President: Narrative Discontinuity, Historical Revisionism, and the Films of Oliver Stone,” Marc Singer, Howard University
  • “Moll Flanders on Screen: From Criminal Confession to Romance,” Jessika L. Thomas, West Virginia University, Morgantown
  • “The Filmic Paratext in the Digital Age: Bonus Material and Bogus Material,” Eckart Voigts-Virchow, University of Giessen

For copies of abstracts, visit http://hilarydannenberg.uni-bayreuth.de/.

411: Closing Borders, Bridging Gaps? German Pop at the Millennium

Friday, 29 December 2006, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Washington A, Loews.

A special session.

Presiding: Anke S. Biendarra, University of California, Irvine

  • “Kölner Realismus Redux? The Legacy of 1960s Realism in Postunification Literature,” Carrie Smith-Prei, Trinity College, Dublin
  • “Pop Cultural Positionings: Minor and Major Archives in Feridun Zaimoglu and Benjamin von Stuckrad-Barre,” Thomas Ernst, University of Trier
  • “Author or Data Jockey? Thomas Meinecke's Novels as an ‘Archive of the Surface’,” Enno Stahl, Heinrich-Heine-Institut
  • “‘Eingeborene von Trizonesien’: (Re)Making History in German Schlager,” Sunka Simon, Swarthmore College

418: Postmodernity: Liabilities and Opportunities

Friday, 29 December 2006, 12:00 noon–1:45 p.m., Liberty Ballroom Salon C, Philadelphia Marriott.

A forum. Presiding: Amy J. Elias, University of Tennessee, Knoxville

  • “Postmodernity, Antifoundationalism, and Dialogical Value,” Amy J. Elias
  • “Postmodernity Is Not Postmodernism: Implications for Individuality and Agency,” Elizabeth Deeds Ermarth, University of Edinburgh
  • “The Death of Postmodernism and the Rise of Informationalism,” N. Katherine Hayles, University of California, Los Angeles
  • “Postmodernity and Information Machines,” Mark Poster, University of California, Irvine

432: Contexts for Electronic Editing

Friday, 29 December 2006, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 404, Philadelphia Marriott.

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Information Technology

Presiding: Kenneth M. Price, University of Nebraska, Lincoln

  • “Edition Production and Presentation Technology (EPPT) and the Scholarly Edition,” Kevin S. Kiernan, University of Kentucky
  • “Exploring the Development of a Modern Text with EPPT: William Preston's Illustrations of Masonry,” Andrew Prescott, University of Sheffield
  • “The Transliteracies Project: Research in the Technological, Social, and Cultural Practices of Online Reading,” Alan Liu, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • “Modeling Scholarly Practices with the Renaissance English Knowledgebase (REKn),” Raymond G. Siemens, University of Victoria

448: Electronic Literature and Textual Scholarship

Friday, 29 December 2006, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Commonwealth Hall D, Loews.

Program arranged by the Division on Methods of Literary Research

  • Typee, Revision, and Editing a Fluid Text: Making the Invisible Visible,” John Bryant, Hofstra University
  • “Human Computer Collaboration: Literary Interpretation as Provocation and Response,” Tanya Clement, University of Maryland, College Park

462: The Impact of Identity, Authority, and Culture on Professional Communication

Friday, 29 December 2006, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 306, Philadelphia Marriott.

Program arranged by the Association for Business Communication

Presiding: James K. Archibald, McGill University

  • “Internationalizing Information Systems: Culture and Collaboration along the Sonoran Migratory Pollinator Corridor,” Matthew McCool, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces
  • “How Sensitive Are Professional Translators to Corporate Language and Identity? A Think-Aloud Protocol Study,” Alexander Künzli, Stockholm University
  • “Contrasting Traditional and Alternative Models of Online Scientific Authority: Analysis of Two National Labs' Web Sites,” Maria Cochran, Iowa State University

For copies of abstracts, visit www.businesscommunication.org/.


502: Text and Hypertext: Dictionaries and Their Readers/Users

Friday, 29 December 2006, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 406, Philadelphia Marriott.

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Lexicography

Presiding: Felicia Jean Steele, College of New Jersey

  • “Reading Johnson's Dictionary: Metatext, Hypertext, and Johnson's Relationship with His Readers,” Chris P. Pearce, Boston University
  • “Reading and Writing the Electronic Dictionary: Perspectives from the OED Online,” Katherine Martin, Oxford English Dictionary
  • “The Critical Dictionary: Structure and Audience,” Michael P. Adams, Indiana University, Bloomington

Respondent: John M. Morse, Merriam-Webster, Inc.

For copies of abstracts, visit http://steele.intrasun.tcnj.edu/mla/abstracts.

506: Resisting Texts: Teaching the Virtual Renaissance Book

Friday, 29 December 2006, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 306, Philadelphia Marriott.

Program arranged by the Division on the Teaching of Literature

Presiding: David Scott Kastan, Columbia University

  • “Teaching the Unedited Renaissance: Making Do with PDFs,” Jesse Macliesh Lander, University of Notre Dame
  • “Resisting Texts: Teaching the Digital Book,” Olin Bjork, University of Texas, Austin; John Rumrich, University of Texas, Austin
  • “What Exactly Is a Compendious Dyttie? Teaching Surrey's ‘Epitaphe’ from Early English Books Online (EEBO),” Jason E. Powell, Wake Forest University

508: Children's Digital Literature and Culture

Friday, 29 December 2006, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Grand Ballroom Salon L, Philadelphia Marriott.

Program arranged by the Children's Literature Association

Presiding: Cathlena Martin, University of Florida

  • “The Book Unbound: Children's Digital Literature, Postmodernism, and Consumerism,” June S. Cummins, San Diego State University
  • “Ersatz the Purchaser: Generation Y as Techno-Being and the E-Relevant Texts Written about Them,” Jennie M. Miskec, Christopher Newport University
  • “‘When a Hair-Dryer Becomes a Weapon’: Playable Indulgence and Other Modes of Power in Casual Games, Produced for Preadolescent Girls,” Vered Pnueli, Brunel University

516: Electronic Textual Editing: What's Next?

Friday, 29 December 2006, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 203-A, Convention Center.

Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Scholarly Editions

Presiding: Martha Nell Smith, University of Maryland, College Park

  • Julia H. Flanders, Brown University
  • David Lee Gants, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton
  • Steven E. Jones, Loyola University, Chicago

For copies of abstracts visit www.mith.umd.edu/CSE/MLA2006.

530: Literature and the New Media Economy

Friday, 29 December 2006, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Washington A, Loews.

Program arranged by the Division on Luso-Brazilian Language and Literature

Presiding: Peggy L. Sharpe, Florida State University

  • “The Erotic and Exotic Lure: A Cultural Decoy,” Maria José Somerlate Barbosa, University of Iowa
  • “The Material Girl's Digital Archive: Literature and New Media Economy in Clarah Averbuck's Máquina de pinball,” Leila Maria Lehnen, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque
  • “A hora da estrela: A doméstica no cinema brasileiro contemporâneo,” Sonia M. Roncador, University of Texas, Austin
  • “Singing under Siege: Resistance Music in Portugal and Brazil,” Patricia I. Vieira, Harvard University

570: Media Theory and Cultural Transformation

Friday, 29 December 2006, 7:15–8:30 p.m., Commonwealth Hall D, Loews.

Program arranged by the Division on Literary Criticism

Presiding: N. Katherine Hayles, University of California, Los Angeles

  • “Print and Textual Instability: Resolving the Crisis of Representation in the Age of Johnson,” Mark Edwin Wildermuth, University of Texas of the Permian Basin
  • “Gramophone, Film, Trauma Writer: Trauma's Discursive Dependence on Media,” Brian L. Croxall, Emory University
  • “Revision and the Error,” J. Stephen Murphy, University of California, Berkeley
  • “The Ideology of Digital Embodiment,” Eyal Amiran, University of California, Irvine

593: Deformative and Reformative Critical Practices

Friday, 29 December 2006, 7:15–8:30 p.m., 306, Philadelphia Marriott.

Program arranged by the Discussion Group on Computer Studies in Language and Literature

Presiding: Raymond G. Siemens, University of Victoria

  • “Nanocriticism: Extreme Deformance and Serious Play,” Johanna Drucker, University of Virginia
  • “Transgenic Deformation: Literary Translation and the Digital Archive,” Matt Cohen, Duke University
  • “Reading the Gap in Experimental Poetry,” Lisa Nell Samuels, University of Auckland

611: The Lure and Violence of Globalized Digital Culture

Friday, 29 December 2006, 9:00–10:15 p.m., Congress C, Loews.

Program arranged by the Division on Comparative Studies in Twentieth-Century Literature

Presiding: Marcel H. Cornis-Pope, Virginia Commonwealth University

  • “Information, Terror, and the Poetics of Noise,” Mark Nunes, Southern Polytechnic State University
  • “‘Staring It Straight in the Eye’: A Look at the Network,” Christian Moraru, University of North Carolina, Greensboro
  • “Hypertext: Between the Violence of the Void and the Lure of the System,” Rodica C. Ieta, Murray State University
  • “E-cadie: The Birth of a Cybernation,” Nicole Boudreau, University of Louisiana, Lafayette

635: Writing the Machine: Materiality and Intentionality in Digital Poetry

Saturday, 30 December 2006, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Commonwealth Hall A1, Loews.

A special session.

Presiding: Charles Alexander Baldwin, West Virginia University, Morgantown

  • “The Link in Hypertext Poetry: Modulating the Agency of Author and Reader,” Ziv Neeman, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • “‘To “Interpret” a Computer “Poem” Is Not to Interpret a Poem’: The Computer-Generated Poem as a Limit Case,” Lori A. Emerson, University at Buffalo, State University of New York
  • “Energy Transactions: Transhuman Digital Poetics,” Charles Alexander Baldwin
  • “What Is an Internet Author? Innovative Poetry and Online Communities,” Maria Damon, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

For copies of abstracts, visit www.acsu.buffalo.edu/~lemerson/.

649: Meet the Bloggers: Blogging and the Future of Academia

Saturday, 30 December 2006, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 308, Philadelphia Marriott.

A special session.

Presiding: Scott Kaufman, University of California, Irvine

  • “Instantaneous Citation Index,” Michael F. Bérubé, Penn State University, University Park
  • “I'm Nobody! Who Are You?” Tedra S. Osell, University of Guelph
  • “Form Follows the Function of the Little Magazine,” John Holbo, National University of Singapore
  • “The New Interdisciplinary,” Scott Kaufman

Respondent: Scott McLemee, Inside Higher Ed.

For copies of abstracts, visit http://acephalous.typepad.com/abstract.html.

653: Experimental Poetry and the Visual Arts

Saturday, 30 December 2006, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Grand Ballroom Salon K, Philadelphia Marriott.

Program arranged by the Division on Twentieth-Century American Literature

Presiding: Marianne DeKoven, Rutgers University, New Brunswick

  • “At Sixes and Sevens: Abstraction and Reference in Robert Creeley's ‘Numbers’,” Timothy Pan Yu, University of Toronto
  • “Hinged, Contingent, Joined: Susan Howe's Hinge Picture,” Elisabeth W. Joyce, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania
  • “Digital Poetry's Complex Surfaces: Navigations, Animations, Combinations,” Maria Engberg, Blekinge Institute of Technology
  • “Image Cacophony: The Use of Imagery in Leslie Scalapino's Dahlia's Iris: Secret Autobiography and Fiction,” Brenda Iijima, Brooklyn, NY

684: Early Modern Englishwomen in the Book Trades: A Session in Honor of Katharine F. Pantzer

Saturday, 30 December 2006, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Grand Ballroom Salon K, Philadelphia Marriott.

Program arranged by the Division on Methods of Literary Research

Presiding: Elizabeth H. Hageman, University of New Hampshire, Durham

  • “Women and Patronage in the Early Modern Book Trades,” Helen Smith, University of York
  • “Joan Brome and the Lyly Plays: A Feminist History of the Book,” Tara Lyons, University of Illinois, Urbana
  • “Printing and Bookselling Preferences of Women in the Early Modern London Book Trade,” David Lee Gants, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton; Sarah Neville, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton

707: Challenges of the Future: Foregrounding Diversity in the WPA Palette

Saturday, 30 December 2006, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 302, Philadelphia Marriott.

Program arranged by the Council of Writing Program Administrators

Presiding: Dominic DelliCarpini, York College, PA

  • “Framing Diversity Issues for College Writers: Listening to a Multivocal Writing Program,” Juanita Comfort, West Chester University
  • “Writing Programs, Diversity, and the Knowledge Economy: Some Implications,” Wendy Olson, Washington State University, Pullman
  • “Electronic Equity or Exclusion? Four Campus Digital Divides,” Ellen Strenski, University of California, Irvine
  • “Queer Eye for the Comp Program: Toward a Queer Critique of WPA Work,” Jonathan Alexander, University of Cincinnati; William Banks, East Carolina University

723: Editing's Cultural Work: Building the Electronic New Variorum Shakespeare

Saturday, 30 December 2006, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 308, Philadelphia Marriott.

Program arranged by the Association for Computers and the Humanities

Presiding: Alan Galey, University of Alberta

  • “Past Is Prologue: Early Electronic New Variorum Shakespeares,” Paul Werstine, University of Western Ontario
  • “How Does the Scholar Think? Modeling Editorial Work in the Electronic New Variorum Shakespeare,” Julia H. Flanders, Brown University
  • “Electronic Monuments: The Digital Variorum and Theories of the Archive,” Alan Galey

For copies of abstracts, visit www.ach.org/mla/mla06/ after 1 November.


755: History and Comparative Literature: The Future

Saturday, 30 December 2006, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Commonwealth Hall D, Loews.

Program arranged by the American Comparative Literature Association

Presiding: Eric R. J. Hayot, University of Arizona, Tucson

  • “Influence after Narrative: Literary Annalism and the Search Function,” Daniel Alan Fried, National Central University
  • “What We Don't Know,” Eric R. J. Hayot
  • “Cyberspace, Electronic Texts, and the Future of Comparative Literature,” Kathleen Lenore Komar, University of California, Los Angeles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.